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A photocollage showing an image of a burrito superimposed on a map, sprigs of herbs, and textured decoration.
Photo by Alex Treadway. Photo illustration by Lille Allen

The 13 Essential Vegan Restaurants in Mexico City

Plant-based al pastor at a vegan taquería, black bean tlacoyos from a popular street vendor, carrot tamales at an Enrique Olvera restaurant, and more of CDMX’s best vegan meals

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A photocollage showing an image of a burrito superimposed on a map, sprigs of herbs, and textured decoration.
| Photo by Alex Treadway. Photo illustration by Lille Allen

Plant-based eating has been part of the Mexican diet and culture for centuries. Milpa, an agricultural system historically used by peoples throughout Mesoamerica, relies heavily on corn, beans, and squash. That culture is alive and well in Mexico City, where you’ll find at least a couple of street carts in every neighborhood utilizing fresh ingredients from the milpa: nixtamalized masa to make fresh items like quesadillas (made without cheese in many cases) or tlacoyos, filled with ingredients like squash blossoms, huitlacoche (corn smut), wild mushrooms, or quelites (an herb similar to spinach).

Building on these roots, Mexico City’s vegan and vegetarian communities have expanded significantly in the last decade. Gone are the days when plant-based menus began and ended at raw veggies and lettuce salads. The Roma and Condesa neighborhoods make up the epicenter of vegan culture in the city, partly due to the influence of travelers and remote workers from the U.S. and other countries, but the area is also host to a vibrant weekend bazaar culture, which fosters up-and-coming cooking projects and helps evolve pop-ups into permanent fixtures of the vegan scene. Though the city is home to its fair share of cheeseless pizza and acai bowls, the strongest vegan restaurants in Mexico City offer a true sense of place and a distinctive point of view.

Note: Not all of the restaurants on this list are strictly vegan. Street vendors may use cheese in some items without stating so, or grease their comals with lard. Confirm cooking methods and ingredients fit your dietary needs directly with restaurants or vendors before partaking.

Natalia de la Rosa is a Mexican food writer, mezcal collector, and culinary guide based in Mexico City.

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Vegamo MX

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Vegano aims to offer a wide range of options for multiple types of eaters — vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free, or dairy-free — all under the umbrella of “gordivegano” or “fatty vegan” dining. The menu is based on Mexican and international comfort foods like red or green chilaquiles, a barbecue burrito with breaded cauliflower and plantains, or a breakfast sandwich with tofu scramble, guacamole, and rice paper bacon. Potato, carrot-based cheese, faux chicken, tofu, chickpeas, and cashews fill the pantry. Vegamo’s most Instagrammable dish is the Chewbacca, a sandwich composed of two spinach-avocado waffles around a filling of soy bacon, mushroom stew, and basil pesto. Vegamo is a helpful vegan option in Centro Histórico, where animal-free dining is limited.

A restaurant exterior veiled in sidewalk plants and string lights.
Outside Vegamo.
Vegamo MX

Plantasia

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In 2019, Plantasia brought a pan-Asian lens to Mexico City’s vegan scene. The menu merges flavors, textures, and culinary techniques from Japan, Indonesia, and Thailand. Options include veggie and tofu gyoza; tacos channeling Beijing duck prepared with shiitake and crimini mushrooms, tempeh, and hoisin sauce; and ramen made with coconut-miso broth and topped with avocado tempura, bok choy, shiitake, and tofu. The minimalist space soothes with a combination of concrete and greenery.

Strips of tempura on a bed of rice, topped with chopped herbs.
Katsudon with eggplant tempura, gochujang, and jasmine rice.
Plantasia

Jenni’s Quesadillas

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Tlacoyos are one star among the delightful constellation of dishes from the Mexican milpa. Street stands prepare the thick, ovoid patties with blue or white corn masa and fillings like fava or black bean paste, then top them with salsa, chopped onion, cilantro, and cactus salad. Near Roma Norte, Jenni’s is a popular stand located on the corner of Colima and Merida streets, where the tlacoyos are formed from blue masa. Order yours without the usual sprinkled white cheese.

Gracias Madre

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In Gracias Madre, Eva María Vázquez and Arturo Muñoz have made a truly environmentally friendly and cruelty-free take on the classic Mexico City taquería. Beginning as a street food stand in 2019, the operation has evolved into a small storefront in the Roma Norte neighborhood and a ghost kitchen serving a growing delivery network. The menu includes seitan-based steak tacos, soy brisket tacos, and seitan chicharron in salsa verde. Check out the vegan take on birria, prepared with soy and charred guajillo chiles and presented with a side of all-plant birria broth made with cactus and chickpeas. Gracias Madre collaborates with similar-minded projects on desserts, so expect to find a rotating selection of local plant-based sweets.

Two tacos topped with seitan steak.
Tacos at Gracias Madre Taqueria Vegana in Mexico City.
Gracias Madre

After sisters Marisol Arredondo Solano and María Fernanda Arredondo adopted vegan diets in their own lives, they decided to start a plant-based pop-up. With time, their project became Paxil, an animal-free eatery inspired by Mexico’s seafood traditions. The Paxil stand sits in the heart of Roma Norte, offering a plant-centric menu with faux ceviche, aguachile, and “seafood” tacos and tostadas. The team uses grilled oyster mushrooms, marinated tomatoes, and cauliflower, among other plants — combined with seasonings like seaweed, dry chiles, and black salsas — to recreate the flavors and textures typical of Mexican seafood. The veg-tuna tostada with a base of marinated tomatoes and sesame seeds, topped with avocado and fried leek, is a must-try, as are the “fish” and chips, prepared with fried oyster mushrooms in vegan batter. Unlike some other plant-based street food in Mexico City, Paxil skips substitutions made with soy and seitan.

A customer uses a spoon to ladle speckled hot sauce onto their bowl.
Topping an item with hot sauce at Paxil.
Paxil

Los Loosers

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Started in 2011 as a forefront vegan-friendly takeout project powered by a local bike-riding community, Los Loosers has become a successful restaurant in Colonia Roma. Chef Mariana Blanco utilizes heirloom corn to prepare her nixtamalized tortillas, corn gorditas, tetelas, and tamales. Los Loosers incorporates Korean and Japanese flavors to give eclectic twists to a menu that, overall, is very much anchored in Mexican comfort cooking.

Forever Vegano

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Forever Vegano is perhaps the most famous vegan restaurant in Mexico City due to its broad menu and privileged location in a beautiful Art Nouveau mansion in Roma Norte. Try the squash blossoms filled with cashew cheese or the Contramar-inspired faux tuna tostadas prepared with watermelon sashimi, avocado, plant-based mayo, and fried leeks. Though not as typical of Mexico City, the “chicken” and waffles are rightly famous.

A bowl of noodles topped with sliced avocados, peanuts, and sauce
A noodle dish at Forever Vegano.
Forever Vegano

Pan Comido

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If you find yourself craving vegan comfort food, head to Pan Comido. For over a decade, the restaurant has been providing Mexico City’s growing vegan community with plant-based versions of hamburgers, hot dogs, sandwiches, and tortas. Order the soy milanesa torta stuffed with beans, corn, vegan mayo, and veggies, or go for the all-plant tacos prepared with seitan, portobello mushrooms, or tempeh. The menu is mostly vegetarian, so it is best to inquire about ingredient swaps to make items vegan. As of late, Pan Comido has incorporated a fried “chicken” sandwich and vegan mac and cheese into the menu.

Three enmoladas covered in a thick brown sauce and stripes of white sauce, topped with chopped herbs.
Enmoladas at Pan Comido.
Pan Comido

Culinaria Vegetal - Roma

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Culinaria Vegetal is a small but decently stocked shop with local and imported gourmet vegan ingredients. It’s a great source for stocking a picnic basket with items like vegan charcuterie, root chips, dried fruits, and vegan cookies. Pick up a bottle from Culinaria Vegetal’s small selection of natural wines while you’re at it. There are two locations in the city: Roma and Polanco.

The interior of a small grocery store with shelves of products and a green space visible out the back of the shop.
Inside the Culinaria Vegetal shop.
Culinaria Vegetal

La Pitahaya Vegana

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In 2015, Laura Cárdenas and Guillermo García started selling vegan food from a Volkswagen bug and quickly became popular at weekend markets. Today, in a permanent space, their approach to veganism is colorful, with fresh ingredients sourced through fair-trade practices and verified traceability to different regions of Mexico: white corn from Sinaloa, organic hibiscus flowers from Nayarit, black beans from Puebla, and more. The two must-try tacos — served on beet-dyed pink corn tortillas — are the mushroom with pineapple puree and the cauliflower with coconut cheese. As a main course, order the Mixteco-style black mole, lightly spiced with deeply roasted chiles and plated with pink tortillas, plantains, faux cheese, and rice.

Three tacos with different colorful fillings on served on bright pink tortillas.
Tacos on beet-dyed tortillas at La Pitahaya Vegana.
Alex Treadway

Por Siempre Vegana Taquería

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In 2014, there weren’t many strictly vegan options among Mexico City’s street food  operations, so Luis Felipe Rodríguez created Por Siempre Vegana Taquería to fill that gap. A year later, the restaurant welcomed chef Rafael Cruz, who uses plant-based recipes to mimic street tacos like al pastor, milanesa, brisket, and sausage in what he calls “transition food.” Wild mushrooms and chickpeas are plentiful, soy or pressed wheat create milanesa steak, and a variety of “cheeses” are prepared with soy, rice, or peas.

A platter of mixed vegetables and fake meat items.
A platter of items at Por Siempre.
Por Siempre Vegana Taquería

Molino Pujol

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Though Molino Pujol, a restaurant under the umbrella of chef Enrique Olvera’s hospitality ecosystem, serves omnivores, it’s also a solid option for vegans, who can indulge in the corn-centric menu inspired by milpa cuisine. Dishes like the carrot tamal with red mole, the avocado or huitlacoche tacos, and the pear with almond tamal can make for a great plant-based meal. Molino Pujol’s beverage program is equally exciting and refreshing, since it taps into Mexico’s traditional nonalcoholic drinks such as tepache (fermented pineapple), champurrado (a hot beverage prepared with cacao and corn), and agua de maíz (a roasted corn-based agua fresca). Molino Pujol includes sprinkled fresh cheese or crema on some dishes, so request to skip the dairy when you order.

Na Tlali

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Focused on sustainability, traceable ingredients, and mindful eating — with little interest in creating vegetable-based substitutes for meat — chef Onna Ferrer brings regional, animal-free cooking from Oaxaca, Central Mexico, and Veracruz to the southern CDMX neighborhood of San Angel. The restaurant draws on those regions for fresh aromatic herbs like pápalo, quelites, and hoja santa; seasonal produce like squash blossoms, huitlacoche, and heirloom corn; and other crucial aspects of the milpa agricultural basket. Order the plantain molotes stuffed with huitlacoche in guajillo sauce, the green enmoladas with acoyote beans and pumpkin seeds, or the hoja santa tetela with Oaxacan mole and plant-based cheese. Na Tlali also has a small shop with organic produce and plastic-free products to stock your fridge and pantry.

A tamal covered in dark mole, topped with sesame seeds and herbs.
Bean and hoja santa tamal in mole negro.
Na Tlali

Vegamo MX

Vegano aims to offer a wide range of options for multiple types of eaters — vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free, or dairy-free — all under the umbrella of “gordivegano” or “fatty vegan” dining. The menu is based on Mexican and international comfort foods like red or green chilaquiles, a barbecue burrito with breaded cauliflower and plantains, or a breakfast sandwich with tofu scramble, guacamole, and rice paper bacon. Potato, carrot-based cheese, faux chicken, tofu, chickpeas, and cashews fill the pantry. Vegamo’s most Instagrammable dish is the Chewbacca, a sandwich composed of two spinach-avocado waffles around a filling of soy bacon, mushroom stew, and basil pesto. Vegamo is a helpful vegan option in Centro Histórico, where animal-free dining is limited.

A restaurant exterior veiled in sidewalk plants and string lights.
Outside Vegamo.
Vegamo MX

Plantasia

In 2019, Plantasia brought a pan-Asian lens to Mexico City’s vegan scene. The menu merges flavors, textures, and culinary techniques from Japan, Indonesia, and Thailand. Options include veggie and tofu gyoza; tacos channeling Beijing duck prepared with shiitake and crimini mushrooms, tempeh, and hoisin sauce; and ramen made with coconut-miso broth and topped with avocado tempura, bok choy, shiitake, and tofu. The minimalist space soothes with a combination of concrete and greenery.

Strips of tempura on a bed of rice, topped with chopped herbs.
Katsudon with eggplant tempura, gochujang, and jasmine rice.
Plantasia

Jenni’s Quesadillas

Tlacoyos are one star among the delightful constellation of dishes from the Mexican milpa. Street stands prepare the thick, ovoid patties with blue or white corn masa and fillings like fava or black bean paste, then top them with salsa, chopped onion, cilantro, and cactus salad. Near Roma Norte, Jenni’s is a popular stand located on the corner of Colima and Merida streets, where the tlacoyos are formed from blue masa. Order yours without the usual sprinkled white cheese.

Gracias Madre

In Gracias Madre, Eva María Vázquez and Arturo Muñoz have made a truly environmentally friendly and cruelty-free take on the classic Mexico City taquería. Beginning as a street food stand in 2019, the operation has evolved into a small storefront in the Roma Norte neighborhood and a ghost kitchen serving a growing delivery network. The menu includes seitan-based steak tacos, soy brisket tacos, and seitan chicharron in salsa verde. Check out the vegan take on birria, prepared with soy and charred guajillo chiles and presented with a side of all-plant birria broth made with cactus and chickpeas. Gracias Madre collaborates with similar-minded projects on desserts, so expect to find a rotating selection of local plant-based sweets.

Two tacos topped with seitan steak.
Tacos at Gracias Madre Taqueria Vegana in Mexico City.
Gracias Madre

Paxil

After sisters Marisol Arredondo Solano and María Fernanda Arredondo adopted vegan diets in their own lives, they decided to start a plant-based pop-up. With time, their project became Paxil, an animal-free eatery inspired by Mexico’s seafood traditions. The Paxil stand sits in the heart of Roma Norte, offering a plant-centric menu with faux ceviche, aguachile, and “seafood” tacos and tostadas. The team uses grilled oyster mushrooms, marinated tomatoes, and cauliflower, among other plants — combined with seasonings like seaweed, dry chiles, and black salsas — to recreate the flavors and textures typical of Mexican seafood. The veg-tuna tostada with a base of marinated tomatoes and sesame seeds, topped with avocado and fried leek, is a must-try, as are the “fish” and chips, prepared with fried oyster mushrooms in vegan batter. Unlike some other plant-based street food in Mexico City, Paxil skips substitutions made with soy and seitan.

A customer uses a spoon to ladle speckled hot sauce onto their bowl.
Topping an item with hot sauce at Paxil.
Paxil

Los Loosers

Started in 2011 as a forefront vegan-friendly takeout project powered by a local bike-riding community, Los Loosers has become a successful restaurant in Colonia Roma. Chef Mariana Blanco utilizes heirloom corn to prepare her nixtamalized tortillas, corn gorditas, tetelas, and tamales. Los Loosers incorporates Korean and Japanese flavors to give eclectic twists to a menu that, overall, is very much anchored in Mexican comfort cooking.

Forever Vegano

Forever Vegano is perhaps the most famous vegan restaurant in Mexico City due to its broad menu and privileged location in a beautiful Art Nouveau mansion in Roma Norte. Try the squash blossoms filled with cashew cheese or the Contramar-inspired faux tuna tostadas prepared with watermelon sashimi, avocado, plant-based mayo, and fried leeks. Though not as typical of Mexico City, the “chicken” and waffles are rightly famous.

A bowl of noodles topped with sliced avocados, peanuts, and sauce
A noodle dish at Forever Vegano.
Forever Vegano

Pan Comido

If you find yourself craving vegan comfort food, head to Pan Comido. For over a decade, the restaurant has been providing Mexico City’s growing vegan community with plant-based versions of hamburgers, hot dogs, sandwiches, and tortas. Order the soy milanesa torta stuffed with beans, corn, vegan mayo, and veggies, or go for the all-plant tacos prepared with seitan, portobello mushrooms, or tempeh. The menu is mostly vegetarian, so it is best to inquire about ingredient swaps to make items vegan. As of late, Pan Comido has incorporated a fried “chicken” sandwich and vegan mac and cheese into the menu.

Three enmoladas covered in a thick brown sauce and stripes of white sauce, topped with chopped herbs.
Enmoladas at Pan Comido.
Pan Comido

Culinaria Vegetal - Roma

Culinaria Vegetal is a small but decently stocked shop with local and imported gourmet vegan ingredients. It’s a great source for stocking a picnic basket with items like vegan charcuterie, root chips, dried fruits, and vegan cookies. Pick up a bottle from Culinaria Vegetal’s small selection of natural wines while you’re at it. There are two locations in the city: Roma and Polanco.

The interior of a small grocery store with shelves of products and a green space visible out the back of the shop.
Inside the Culinaria Vegetal shop.
Culinaria Vegetal

La Pitahaya Vegana

In 2015, Laura Cárdenas and Guillermo García started selling vegan food from a Volkswagen bug and quickly became popular at weekend markets. Today, in a permanent space, their approach to veganism is colorful, with fresh ingredients sourced through fair-trade practices and verified traceability to different regions of Mexico: white corn from Sinaloa, organic hibiscus flowers from Nayarit, black beans from Puebla, and more. The two must-try tacos — served on beet-dyed pink corn tortillas — are the mushroom with pineapple puree and the cauliflower with coconut cheese. As a main course, order the Mixteco-style black mole, lightly spiced with deeply roasted chiles and plated with pink tortillas, plantains, faux cheese, and rice.

Three tacos with different colorful fillings on served on bright pink tortillas.
Tacos on beet-dyed tortillas at La Pitahaya Vegana.
Alex Treadway

Por Siempre Vegana Taquería

In 2014, there weren’t many strictly vegan options among Mexico City’s street food  operations, so Luis Felipe Rodríguez created Por Siempre Vegana Taquería to fill that gap. A year later, the restaurant welcomed chef Rafael Cruz, who uses plant-based recipes to mimic street tacos like al pastor, milanesa, brisket, and sausage in what he calls “transition food.” Wild mushrooms and chickpeas are plentiful, soy or pressed wheat create milanesa steak, and a variety of “cheeses” are prepared with soy, rice, or peas.

A platter of mixed vegetables and fake meat items.
A platter of items at Por Siempre.
Por Siempre Vegana Taquería

Molino Pujol

Though Molino Pujol, a restaurant under the umbrella of chef Enrique Olvera’s hospitality ecosystem, serves omnivores, it’s also a solid option for vegans, who can indulge in the corn-centric menu inspired by milpa cuisine. Dishes like the carrot tamal with red mole, the avocado or huitlacoche tacos, and the pear with almond tamal can make for a great plant-based meal. Molino Pujol’s beverage program is equally exciting and refreshing, since it taps into Mexico’s traditional nonalcoholic drinks such as tepache (fermented pineapple), champurrado (a hot beverage prepared with cacao and corn), and agua de maíz (a roasted corn-based agua fresca). Molino Pujol includes sprinkled fresh cheese or crema on some dishes, so request to skip the dairy when you order.

Na Tlali

Focused on sustainability, traceable ingredients, and mindful eating — with little interest in creating vegetable-based substitutes for meat — chef Onna Ferrer brings regional, animal-free cooking from Oaxaca, Central Mexico, and Veracruz to the southern CDMX neighborhood of San Angel. The restaurant draws on those regions for fresh aromatic herbs like pápalo, quelites, and hoja santa; seasonal produce like squash blossoms, huitlacoche, and heirloom corn; and other crucial aspects of the milpa agricultural basket. Order the plantain molotes stuffed with huitlacoche in guajillo sauce, the green enmoladas with acoyote beans and pumpkin seeds, or the hoja santa tetela with Oaxacan mole and plant-based cheese. Na Tlali also has a small shop with organic produce and plastic-free products to stock your fridge and pantry.

A tamal covered in dark mole, topped with sesame seeds and herbs.
Bean and hoja santa tamal in mole negro.
Na Tlali

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