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The Best Ramen in Every Tokyo Neighborhood

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If you are going to Tokyo, you are going to want ramen. True obsessives could happily construct a weeklong pilgrimage without nicking the surface: Tokyo's ramen scene is vast, encompassing a range of local styles, like shoyu and tsukemen (dipping noodles), as well as regional variations, from tonkotsu (pork-based) to miso, in its nearly 7,000 ramenya. So instead of going in search of ramen, why not let it come to you?

Here are a few choice shops in prime locations, plus a couple of gems worth seeking out farther afield. Keep in mind that popular shops can command a lengthy line, with wait times ranging from 30 minutes to an hour (or more). A bowl will typically set you back about ¥800.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. むぎとオリーブ (Mugitooribu in Ginza)

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6 Chome-12-12 Ginza, Chūō-ku
Tōkyō-to 104-0061, Japan
+81 3-3571-2123
Mugitooribu (which translates as wheat and olive) blends together an uncommon triple soup of chicken broth, dashi, and clam broth for a deep sensation of umami. The noodles are imported from a respected factory in Kyoto, and the eggs come from Japan's No. 1 supplier, Sailor (セーラー). Be sure to add a little of the original olive oil condiment for another layer of flavor.

2. 志奈そば 田なか Second (Shinasoba Tanaka Second in Akihabara)

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3 Chome-4-1 Sotokanda, Chiyoda-ku
Tōkyō-to 101-0021, Japan
+81 3-3258-5282
The entire menu at Tanaka Second is good, but the kakesoba really stands out. The soup, made with abalone and Japanese spiny lobster, is so decadent that it is served plain with noodles — no toppings muddy the shock of uncut ocean flavor. Owner-chef Tanaka-san is a surfer who lives by the sea, and the ramen reflects his sensibility. Though limited to just 30 bowls a day, it rarely sells out.

3. 自家製麺 MENSHO TOKYO (Homemade Noodles MENSHO TOKYO in Kasuga)

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1 Chome-15-9 Kasuga, Bunkyō-ku
Tōkyō-to 112-0003, Japan
Mensho Tokyo's master, Shono-san, has a few shops, each with a different style. His fifth shop, just outside Tokyo Dome, serves pork tonkotsu and lamb bone soup, a unique style of his own invention. His shop’s counter is packed with condiments, such as roasted tea powder and an original spice made with star anise and cloves.

4. 牛骨らぁ麺 マタドール (Gyukotsu Ramen Matador in Kita-Senju)

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Japan, 〒120-0025 Tōkyō-to, Adachi-ku, Senjuazuma
2 Chome−4−17, 中村ビル
+81 3-3888-3443
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While Matador is not as central as other shops, if you want to try the best beef ramen in Tokyo, it’s a worthwhile trip. Get the zeitaku yakigyū ramen (the most expensive one at ¥1,150). It comes with a massive slice of roast beef, extra stewed beef, and an egg. Definitely worth the ¥250 price hike above the normal bowl.

5. KABOちゃん (Kabochan in Komagome)

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1 Chome-54-1 Nishigahara, Kita-ku
Tōkyō-to 114-0024, Japan
Kabochan unexpectedly combines two Japanese specialties: ramen and kakigōri (shaved ice). The ramen, especially the miso, is beloved by ramen nerds for its blend of pungent miso and an original spice blend, while the kakigōri is the perfect after-ramen dessert — not too heavy or sweet, and always prepared with the freshest seasonal fruits. Try to arrive about 20 minutes before it opens at 6 p.m., as the shop only seats six people.

6. 蔦 (Tsuta in Sugamo)

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1 Chome-14-1 Sugamo, Toshima-ku
Tōkyō-to 170-0002, Japan
There is a reason Tsuta was the first ramen shop in Tokyo to be awarded a Michelin star: The signature shoyusoba bowl features shoyu made from a blend of craft soy sauce, spiked with homemade truffle paste. Be sure to get there early in the morning (tickets are given out at 7 a.m.) for a timed ticket, then come back for one of the cheapest Michelin-starred meals (¥1,000 for their standard bowl of shoyusoba) on the planet.

7. 中華ソバ 伊吹 (Chukasoba Ibuki in Itabashi)

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Japan, 〒174-0063 Tōkyō-to, Itabashi-ku, Maenochō
4 Chome−40−10, 前野町四丁目第4アパート10
+81 80-4928-0013
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If you really love the hint of bitter, smoky, and fishy tastes you find in many bowls of ramen in Tokyo — thanks to niboshi (dried baby sardines) — then Ibuki is worth a trip. Overloading on niboshi is a Tokyo signature, and Ibuki is considered by most critics to be the city’s best example. The shop is in a residential neighborhood, on a lesser subway line, so only go if you really, really love niboshi. Plenty of people do, and even showing up an hour early (they open for dinner at 6:30 p.m.) will still mean waiting in line anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour.

8. らぁ麺 やまぐち (Ramen Yamaguchi in Takadanobaba)

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2 Chome-11-13 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku
Tōkyō-to 169-0051, Japan
+81 3-3204-5120
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Most ramen is pork-based, and Yamaguchi's soup is worth experiencing simply because it is 100 percent chicken broth, rounded by light accents of dashi and a premium soy sauce. Most regulars order the torisoba (chicken noodles) and an extra serving of the shop's sous vide chicken chāshū as a topping.

9. 肉煮干し中華そば さいころ (Nikuniboshi Chukasoba Saikoro in Nakano)

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2 Chome-28-8 Nakano, Nakano-ku
Tōkyō-to 164-0001, Japan
+81 3-6304-8902
Visit Website
Saikoro has been serving what the owner, Koitani-san, calls “Japanese soul noodles” — his version of the ultimate comfort food — for about 15 years. Thick noodles are made upstairs and paired with with a traditional shoyu soup. Funk music is often playing on the stereo, which befits a shop named “dice,” after the dice hanging from the owner's Cadillac mirror.

10. 風雲児 (Fuunji in Shinuku)

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Japan, 〒151-0053 Tokyo
渋谷区Yoyogi, 2 Chome−14−3 北斗第一ビル 1F
+81 3-6413-8480
Visit Website
Fuunji has officially been discovered, thanks to travel guides, bloggers, and Instagrammers. Since opening in 2007, it has always had a line, but now the people lining up are no longer just locals. Don't be dismayed: it moves quickly. Tsukemen, noodles meant to be dipped in a thick chicken and dried fish soup stock, is the dish to order. You'll be asked if you want nami (normal) or omori (large). Unless you are starving, nami should be fine.

11. はやし (Hayashi in Shibuya)

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Japan, 〒150-0043 Tōkyō-to, Shibuya-ku, 渋谷区Dōgenzaka
1 Chome−14−9, ソシアル道玄坂
+81 3-3770-9029
Lunch only ramen shops tend to focus their efforts on one pot of lunchtime soup, which means they do one thing really well, as opposed to shops that need to prepare more options for a dinner service. Hayashi's pork-heavy soup is only available for a few hours a day, from 11:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. (or until it runs out), but the convenient location close to Shibuya Station makes it an easy choice for someone short on time. The menu only has three choices: plain, with an egg, or with extra pork. Go for the egg. The flavors are strong at first, with a mellow, creamy aftertaste.

12. 中華そば すずらん (Chukasoba Suzuran in Ebisu)

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Japan, 〒150-0013 Tōkyō-to, Shibuya-ku, 渋谷区Ebisu
1 Chome−7−12, 久保ビル
+81 3-5422-6705
Tucked away in the recess of a random building, next to a stairwell, with no street-side windows, Suzuran feels obscure, with a quiet, high-end feel. The prices are a little higher than at other ramen shops (¥1,650 for kakunimen, or stewed pork ramen), but every aspect of the meal, down to the porcelain bowl, is of the highest quality. It’s known for house-made noodles and juicy cuts of meat, especially the chāshūmen (braised pork ramen) or kakunimen.

1. むぎとオリーブ (Mugitooribu in Ginza)

6 Chome-12-12 Ginza, Chūō-ku, Tōkyō-to 104-0061, Japan
Mugitooribu (which translates as wheat and olive) blends together an uncommon triple soup of chicken broth, dashi, and clam broth for a deep sensation of umami. The noodles are imported from a respected factory in Kyoto, and the eggs come from Japan's No. 1 supplier, Sailor (セーラー). Be sure to add a little of the original olive oil condiment for another layer of flavor.
6 Chome-12-12 Ginza, Chūō-ku
Tōkyō-to 104-0061, Japan

2. 志奈そば 田なか Second (Shinasoba Tanaka Second in Akihabara)

3 Chome-4-1 Sotokanda, Chiyoda-ku, Tōkyō-to 101-0021, Japan
The entire menu at Tanaka Second is good, but the kakesoba really stands out. The soup, made with abalone and Japanese spiny lobster, is so decadent that it is served plain with noodles — no toppings muddy the shock of uncut ocean flavor. Owner-chef Tanaka-san is a surfer who lives by the sea, and the ramen reflects his sensibility. Though limited to just 30 bowls a day, it rarely sells out.
3 Chome-4-1 Sotokanda, Chiyoda-ku
Tōkyō-to 101-0021, Japan

3. 自家製麺 MENSHO TOKYO (Homemade Noodles MENSHO TOKYO in Kasuga)

1 Chome-15-9 Kasuga, Bunkyō-ku, Tōkyō-to 112-0003, Japan
Mensho Tokyo's master, Shono-san, has a few shops, each with a different style. His fifth shop, just outside Tokyo Dome, serves pork tonkotsu and lamb bone soup, a unique style of his own invention. His shop’s counter is packed with condiments, such as roasted tea powder and an original spice made with star anise and cloves.
1 Chome-15-9 Kasuga, Bunkyō-ku
Tōkyō-to 112-0003, Japan

4. 牛骨らぁ麺 マタドール (Gyukotsu Ramen Matador in Kita-Senju)

Japan, 〒120-0025 Tōkyō-to, Adachi-ku, Senjuazuma, 2 Chome−4−17, 中村ビル
While Matador is not as central as other shops, if you want to try the best beef ramen in Tokyo, it’s a worthwhile trip. Get the zeitaku yakigyū ramen (the most expensive one at ¥1,150). It comes with a massive slice of roast beef, extra stewed beef, and an egg. Definitely worth the ¥250 price hike above the normal bowl.
Japan, 〒120-0025 Tōkyō-to, Adachi-ku, Senjuazuma
2 Chome−4−17, 中村ビル

5. KABOちゃん (Kabochan in Komagome)

1 Chome-54-1 Nishigahara, Kita-ku, Tōkyō-to 114-0024, Japan
Kabochan unexpectedly combines two Japanese specialties: ramen and kakigōri (shaved ice). The ramen, especially the miso, is beloved by ramen nerds for its blend of pungent miso and an original spice blend, while the kakigōri is the perfect after-ramen dessert — not too heavy or sweet, and always prepared with the freshest seasonal fruits. Try to arrive about 20 minutes before it opens at 6 p.m., as the shop only seats six people.
1 Chome-54-1 Nishigahara, Kita-ku
Tōkyō-to 114-0024, Japan

6. 蔦 (Tsuta in Sugamo)

1 Chome-14-1 Sugamo, Toshima-ku, Tōkyō-to 170-0002, Japan
There is a reason Tsuta was the first ramen shop in Tokyo to be awarded a Michelin star: The signature shoyusoba bowl features shoyu made from a blend of craft soy sauce, spiked with homemade truffle paste. Be sure to get there early in the morning (tickets are given out at 7 a.m.) for a timed ticket, then come back for one of the cheapest Michelin-starred meals (¥1,000 for their standard bowl of shoyusoba) on the planet.
1 Chome-14-1 Sugamo, Toshima-ku
Tōkyō-to 170-0002, Japan

7. 中華ソバ 伊吹 (Chukasoba Ibuki in Itabashi)

Japan, 〒174-0063 Tōkyō-to, Itabashi-ku, Maenochō, 4 Chome−40−10, 前野町四丁目第4アパート10
If you really love the hint of bitter, smoky, and fishy tastes you find in many bowls of ramen in Tokyo — thanks to niboshi (dried baby sardines) — then Ibuki is worth a trip. Overloading on niboshi is a Tokyo signature, and Ibuki is considered by most critics to be the city’s best example. The shop is in a residential neighborhood, on a lesser subway line, so only go if you really, really love niboshi. Plenty of people do, and even showing up an hour early (they open for dinner at 6:30 p.m.) will still mean waiting in line anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour.
Japan, 〒174-0063 Tōkyō-to, Itabashi-ku, Maenochō
4 Chome−40−10, 前野町四丁目第4アパート10

8. らぁ麺 やまぐち (Ramen Yamaguchi in Takadanobaba)

2 Chome-11-13 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tōkyō-to 169-0051, Japan
Most ramen is pork-based, and Yamaguchi's soup is worth experiencing simply because it is 100 percent chicken broth, rounded by light accents of dashi and a premium soy sauce. Most regulars order the torisoba (chicken noodles) and an extra serving of the shop's sous vide chicken chāshū as a topping.
2 Chome-11-13 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku
Tōkyō-to 169-0051, Japan

9. 肉煮干し中華そば さいころ (Nikuniboshi Chukasoba Saikoro in Nakano)

2 Chome-28-8 Nakano, Nakano-ku, Tōkyō-to 164-0001, Japan
Saikoro has been serving what the owner, Koitani-san, calls “Japanese soul noodles” — his version of the ultimate comfort food — for about 15 years. Thick noodles are made upstairs and paired with with a traditional shoyu soup. Funk music is often playing on the stereo, which befits a shop named “dice,” after the dice hanging from the owner's Cadillac mirror.
2 Chome-28-8 Nakano, Nakano-ku
Tōkyō-to 164-0001, Japan

10. 風雲児 (Fuunji in Shinuku)

Japan, 〒151-0053 Tokyo, 渋谷区Yoyogi, 2 Chome−14−3 北斗第一ビル 1F
Fuunji has officially been discovered, thanks to travel guides, bloggers, and Instagrammers. Since opening in 2007, it has always had a line, but now the people lining up are no longer just locals. Don't be dismayed: it moves quickly. Tsukemen, noodles meant to be dipped in a thick chicken and dried fish soup stock, is the dish to order. You'll be asked if you want nami (normal) or omori (large). Unless you are starving, nami should be fine.
Japan, 〒151-0053 Tokyo
渋谷区Yoyogi, 2 Chome−14−3 北斗第一ビル 1F

11. はやし (Hayashi in Shibuya)

Japan, 〒150-0043 Tōkyō-to, Shibuya-ku, 渋谷区Dōgenzaka, 1 Chome−14−9, ソシアル道玄坂
Lunch only ramen shops tend to focus their efforts on one pot of lunchtime soup, which means they do one thing really well, as opposed to shops that need to prepare more options for a dinner service. Hayashi's pork-heavy soup is only available for a few hours a day, from 11:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. (or until it runs out), but the convenient location close to Shibuya Station makes it an easy choice for someone short on time. The menu only has three choices: plain, with an egg, or with extra pork. Go for the egg. The flavors are strong at first, with a mellow, creamy aftertaste.
Japan, 〒150-0043 Tōkyō-to, Shibuya-ku, 渋谷区Dōgenzaka
1 Chome−14−9, ソシアル道玄坂

12. 中華そば すずらん (Chukasoba Suzuran in Ebisu)

Japan, 〒150-0013 Tōkyō-to, Shibuya-ku, 渋谷区Ebisu, 1 Chome−7−12, 久保ビル
Tucked away in the recess of a random building, next to a stairwell, with no street-side windows, Suzuran feels obscure, with a quiet, high-end feel. The prices are a little higher than at other ramen shops (¥1,650 for kakunimen, or stewed pork ramen), but every aspect of the meal, down to the porcelain bowl, is of the highest quality. It’s known for house-made noodles and juicy cuts of meat, especially the chāshūmen (braised pork ramen) or kakunimen.
Japan, 〒150-0013 Tōkyō-to, Shibuya-ku, 渋谷区Ebisu
1 Chome−7−12, 久保ビル

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