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The 14 Hottest Ramen Shops Across the US Right Now

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As Fall begins its cold, sinister creep, it's time to start thinking about cold weather food. Thankfully the ramen trend did not slow down over the Summer, and now you have plenty of noodle shops around the country offering steaming bowls to warm you up. And while some of the ramen shops from last Winter's map are still hot, there are a bunch of new offerings as well

While once the ramen trend was relegated to big cities like LA or New York, or smaller hipster enclaves like Portland and Austin, ramen is now all over the place. Take, for example, the Kaiteki Ramen food truck in Oklahoma City, or Tempe, Arizona's Chipotle-esque Umami. As the ramen trend spreads, New York has gotten more creative with ramen styles, including the green curry ramen at Bassanova and Yuji Haraguchi's mazemen-style Yugi Ramen counter at Whole Foods. Others, like Tsujita LA Annex in Los Angeles, are sticking with a more traditional route. And there's an entire restaurant in New Orleans dedicated to serving ramen and pie (as in apple and pecan), called, appropriately, Noodles & Pie.

Below, the Eater National Ramen Heat Map, featuring some of the best ramen shop openings across the United States that have opened over the last twelve months. Don't say your favorite place? Let us know in the comments below. Long lines and long noodles, ahead.



· All Ramen Coverage on Eater [-E-]
· All Eater Heatmaps [-E-]

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Bassanova Ramen

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The first US location for a Tokyo ramen shop, Bassanova is famous for a green curry-style ramen. According to Eater NY, the "opening chef was none other than Keizo Shimamoto" before he moved on to more burger-related ramen pursuits.[Photo]

Daikaya

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Barely open in time for the last ramen map, Daikaya continues to reign as one of DC's buzziest new ramenyas. The downstairs of Daikaya serves ramen while the upstairs is an izakaya. Four types of ramen on the menu from Minibar alum Katsuya Fukushima, including a vegan option.[Photo]

Kaiteki Ramen

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Ramen out of a food truck in Oklahoma City? Sure: Jeff Chanchaleune and John Vu opened Kaiteki this summer serving a small menu that consists of two types of ramen (shoyu and a vegetarian options), one type of bao, wings, brussels sprouts, and that is it. Check out their Twitter to find out where they're going to be (and whether they've sold out for the day).[Photo]

Momi Ramen

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Tonkotsu and miso ramens from chef Jeffrey Z. Chen, who worked at ramen houses in Japan for over ten years before setting up (noodle) shop in Miami.[Photo]

Noodle &  Pie

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Noodle & Pie, as its name might suggest, serves three types of ramen (including a beef and kimchi bowl) and four types of pie (including bacon pecan). What more could you want? Okay, there's also a smattering of izakaya-esque dishes.[Photo]

Oiistar

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Oiistar boasts noodles made in-house, an 18-hour pork broth, and variations on ramen including a version with mussels and a "pozolmen."[Photo]

Ramen Izakaya Goku

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Despite funding from the Japan-based chain Shabuway, Goku is actually its own entity, serving up ramen and izakaya plates. According to Eater SF, Goku serves "five ramen options, from the classic tonkotsu and shoyu options to veggie miso and clam garlic ramen, and you can tailor your order from the extra toppings list."[Photo]

Ramen Shop

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While the Bay Area caught ramen fever a couple years ahead of the trend in the rest of the country, one major recent opening is Oakland's Ramen Shop. Run by Chez Panisse alums serving a variety of broths (meyer lemon shoyu, anyone?) and a menu of craft cocktails.[Photo]

So Ba is ostensibly a pho restaurant, and yet late at night it turns into chef-favorite Octopus Bar and now, during the day, Mihoko Obunai serves up three flavors of ramen. The menu includes a tonkotsu, a chicken shoyu, and a spicy miso.[Photo]

Tsujita LA Annex

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This Annex of the wildly popular Tsujita serves ramen all day long. Expect: traditional ramen bowls, vegetable juices, tsukemen, and long wait times.[Photo]

Umami takes a sort of Chipotle-esque approach to ramen: pick a broth, pick a meat, pick toppings (from eggs to cabbage to extra meat drippings), pick a spice level. They also serve bento boxes if that's more your speed.[Photo]

Yuji Ramen

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Is the wildest ramen in New York City being made out of counter on the second floor of a Whole Foods? Possibly: Yuji Haraguchi serves mazemen — or mixed noodles — at the Bowery Whole Foods and Brooklyn's Smorgasburg.[Photo]

Yataimura Maru

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A new spot from Portland's Shigezo, Yataimura Maru mimics a "food-stall-lined Japanese alleyway" and serves several types of ramen, including a broth-free Shio Abu Ramen.[Photo]

Yume wo Katare

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The Boston location (there are five in Japan) of this teeny tiny ramen shop serves up pork-based ramen to a mere 16 seats at a time. Rules: Everyone over the age of 12 must order a bowl. Line: always.[Photo]

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Bassanova Ramen

The first US location for a Tokyo ramen shop, Bassanova is famous for a green curry-style ramen. According to Eater NY, the "opening chef was none other than Keizo Shimamoto" before he moved on to more burger-related ramen pursuits.[Photo]

Daikaya

Barely open in time for the last ramen map, Daikaya continues to reign as one of DC's buzziest new ramenyas. The downstairs of Daikaya serves ramen while the upstairs is an izakaya. Four types of ramen on the menu from Minibar alum Katsuya Fukushima, including a vegan option.[Photo]

Kaiteki Ramen

Ramen out of a food truck in Oklahoma City? Sure: Jeff Chanchaleune and John Vu opened Kaiteki this summer serving a small menu that consists of two types of ramen (shoyu and a vegetarian options), one type of bao, wings, brussels sprouts, and that is it. Check out their Twitter to find out where they're going to be (and whether they've sold out for the day).[Photo]

Momi Ramen

Tonkotsu and miso ramens from chef Jeffrey Z. Chen, who worked at ramen houses in Japan for over ten years before setting up (noodle) shop in Miami.[Photo]

Noodle &  Pie

Noodle & Pie, as its name might suggest, serves three types of ramen (including a beef and kimchi bowl) and four types of pie (including bacon pecan). What more could you want? Okay, there's also a smattering of izakaya-esque dishes.[Photo]

Oiistar

Oiistar boasts noodles made in-house, an 18-hour pork broth, and variations on ramen including a version with mussels and a "pozolmen."[Photo]

Ramen Izakaya Goku

Despite funding from the Japan-based chain Shabuway, Goku is actually its own entity, serving up ramen and izakaya plates. According to Eater SF, Goku serves "five ramen options, from the classic tonkotsu and shoyu options to veggie miso and clam garlic ramen, and you can tailor your order from the extra toppings list."[Photo]

Ramen Shop

While the Bay Area caught ramen fever a couple years ahead of the trend in the rest of the country, one major recent opening is Oakland's Ramen Shop. Run by Chez Panisse alums serving a variety of broths (meyer lemon shoyu, anyone?) and a menu of craft cocktails.[Photo]

So Ba

So Ba is ostensibly a pho restaurant, and yet late at night it turns into chef-favorite Octopus Bar and now, during the day, Mihoko Obunai serves up three flavors of ramen. The menu includes a tonkotsu, a chicken shoyu, and a spicy miso.[Photo]

Tsujita LA Annex

This Annex of the wildly popular Tsujita serves ramen all day long. Expect: traditional ramen bowls, vegetable juices, tsukemen, and long wait times.[Photo]

Umami

Umami takes a sort of Chipotle-esque approach to ramen: pick a broth, pick a meat, pick toppings (from eggs to cabbage to extra meat drippings), pick a spice level. They also serve bento boxes if that's more your speed.[Photo]

Yuji Ramen

Is the wildest ramen in New York City being made out of counter on the second floor of a Whole Foods? Possibly: Yuji Haraguchi serves mazemen — or mixed noodles — at the Bowery Whole Foods and Brooklyn's Smorgasburg.[Photo]

Yataimura Maru

A new spot from Portland's Shigezo, Yataimura Maru mimics a "food-stall-lined Japanese alleyway" and serves several types of ramen, including a broth-free Shio Abu Ramen.[Photo]

Yume wo Katare

The Boston location (there are five in Japan) of this teeny tiny ramen shop serves up pork-based ramen to a mere 16 seats at a time. Rules: Everyone over the age of 12 must order a bowl. Line: always.[Photo]

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