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Nick Solares

Go Back in Time at These 23 Insanely Old American Restaurants

These restaurants have been standing since the 1800s.

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In honor of Eater's first-ever Classics Week, here's a deep dive into America's restaurant-studded past. Each of the 23 establishments on this map opened in the 19th century. And while it's no surprise that historic East Coast cities like Boston are well-represented on the list — Union Oyster House, for example, opened in 1826 — there's some serious West Coast action here too, with San Francisco, Portland, and Seattle all making the cut. From the dressy Commander's Palace in New Orleans to the ultra-casual Schaller's Pump in Chicago, here are 23 classics well over 100 years old.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Antoine's Restaurant

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This 175-year-old restaurant is famously known as the longest operating family-owned restaurant in the country. Antoine's made its mark on the city by introducing oysters Rockefeller, and Eater NOLA says it's "a must on any bucket list." Opened: 1840. [Photo]

Café du Monde

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For more than 150 years, Café du Monde has been the gold standard for two of New Orleans' signature dishes: beignets and coffee and chicory served au lait. Eater NOLA calls the cafe "a true New Orleans classic." Opened: 1862. [Photo]

Commander's Palace

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Not only does this New Orleans institution have age, it has major star power. As Eater NOLA puts it: "The restaurant essentially redefined New Orleans cuisine and catapulted into stardom with the help of celeb chefs Paul Prudhomme and Emeril Lagasse." Today, the kitchen is led by Beard award winner Tory McPhail. Opened: 1880. [Photo]

El Farol

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This Santa Fe restaurant proudly stands as the city's oldest operating restaurant. On the menu these days are Spanish-inspired tapas, paella, and grilled meats. Opened: 1835. [Photo]

Fentons Creamery & Restaurant

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This long-operating ice cream destination (in its current location since the '60s) is known for its black and tan sundaes and for possibly being the birthplace of rocky road ice cream. Opened: 1894. [Photo]

Huber's Cafe

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The oldest restaurant in Portland, OR still delivers on its signature dishes. Eater PDX writes: "As old as it is, the gorgeous mahogany-stained interior topped with arched stained-glass skylights still packs in a steady crowd for its year-round traditional turkey dinner and flaming Spanish coffees." [Photo]

Jake's Famous Crawfish

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This seafood destination is "practically a historic landmark," writes Eater PDX. The name of the game here is simply prepared fish from the Pacific Northwest. Opened: 1892. [Photo]

Katz's Delicatessen

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This iconic New York City institution is a frequent guest on the Eater NY 38. Here's why: "In 127 years, little has changed at Katz's. It remains one of New York's — and the country's — essential delis." Opened: 1888. [Photo]

Keens Steakhouse

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A true New York City institution, Keens has been delighting New Yorkers with its steaks, mutton chops, and iconic clay pipe collection for generations. Eater NY calls it "one of Midtown's best restaurants." Opened: 1885. [Photo]

Marliave

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Originally founded by a French immigrant who gave the restaurant its name, Marliave is no longer a French restaurant. Still, Eater Boston notes that the restaurant "maintains that old French feel," despite a menu that includes risotto and fish-and-chips. Opened: 1885. [Photo]

McGillin's Olde Ale House

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The oldest continually operating tavern in Philadelphia, McGillin's Olde Ale House wasn't always known by its current name. Eater Philly reports: "The bar's original name was technically the Bell in Hand, though it was always known as McGillin's, after the family that owned and operated it for its first 77 years." Opened: 1860. [Photo]

Merchants Cafe & Saloon

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This storied Seattle tavern has stood in the same place for over a century, and with that kind of history ghosts seem inevitable. Lore has it that the tavern is haunted by a girl who died in a fire there. Spooky stuff. Opened: 1890. [Photo]

Old Angler's Inn

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There's a lot of history at this Maryland restaurant, which isn't surprising given its impressive age and Potomac Valley location. Eater DC notes that even with such a distinguished background Old Angler's Inn "has a patio that's great for relaxing." Opened: 1860. [Photo]

Old Ebbitt Grill

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This DC icon is on the cusp of its 160th birthday. Located a stone's throw away from the White House, Eater DC calls Old Ebbitt Grill a "quintessentially classic" destination. Opened: 1856. [Photo]

Parker's Restaurant at the Omni Parker House

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This hotel has been a fixture of Boston hospitality, and it's celebrating its 160th anniversary this year. Its restaurant is known as the progenitor of such Boston classics as Boston cream pie and parker house rolls, and, as Eater Boston puts it: "It's hard to have a list like this and not mention the Omni Parker House." Opened: 1855. [Photo]

Peter Luger Steak House

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This Brooklyn steakhouse isn't just known for its old age. It's a vital part of the New York City restaurant scene (as evidenced by its place on the Eater NY 38), and its dry-aged porterhouse is the stuff of legend. Opened: 1887. [Photo]

Roma Cafe

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This self-proclaimed oldest restaurant in Detroit serves up a classic Italian red sauce menu. According to Eater Detroit, Rom began "as a boarding house and restaurant for farmers vending at Eastern Market." Opened: 1890. [Photo]

Schaller's Pump

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Eater Chicago calls this restaurant and bar "a local legend," and for good reason: For more than 130 years, this continuously operating tavern has been a hub for politicians and baseball fans alike. Opened: 1881. [Photo]

Scholz Garten

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Eater Austin describes Scholz Garten as "the center of German culture in Austin … specializ[ing] in the three Bs: beer, brats, and bowling. But mostly beer." Opened: 1866. [Photo]

Tadich Grill

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Tadich Grill isn't just San Francisco's oldest restaurant, it's California's. Eater SF has named it a "must try," writing: "White-coated waiters, a menu boasting local classics from hangtown fry to cioppino to sand dabs, and a bumping central bar all add to the pleasure." Opened: 1849. [Photo]

The Berghoff Restaurant

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The Berghoff is, as Eater Chicago puts it, "a time capsule in a prominent Loop location." The menu leans German with schnitzel and plenty of sausage, plus there's an entire beer brewing operation. Opened: 1898. [Photo]

The Buckhorn Exchange

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Denver's oldest restaurant is famous for a wide array of meats — including steaks, buffalo, elk, alligator, and the house specialty Rocky Mountain oysters — and has the taxidermy to prove it. Opened: 1893. [Photo]

Union Oyster House

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Union Oyster House is famous for being the oldest >continuously operating restaurant in the country. Eater Boston notes that the restaurant was a favorite of the Kennedy family; how much more classic do you get? Opened: 1826. [Photo]

Antoine's Restaurant

This 175-year-old restaurant is famously known as the longest operating family-owned restaurant in the country. Antoine's made its mark on the city by introducing oysters Rockefeller, and Eater NOLA says it's "a must on any bucket list." Opened: 1840. [Photo]

Café du Monde

For more than 150 years, Café du Monde has been the gold standard for two of New Orleans' signature dishes: beignets and coffee and chicory served au lait. Eater NOLA calls the cafe "a true New Orleans classic." Opened: 1862. [Photo]

Commander's Palace

Not only does this New Orleans institution have age, it has major star power. As Eater NOLA puts it: "The restaurant essentially redefined New Orleans cuisine and catapulted into stardom with the help of celeb chefs Paul Prudhomme and Emeril Lagasse." Today, the kitchen is led by Beard award winner Tory McPhail. Opened: 1880. [Photo]

El Farol

This Santa Fe restaurant proudly stands as the city's oldest operating restaurant. On the menu these days are Spanish-inspired tapas, paella, and grilled meats. Opened: 1835. [Photo]

Fentons Creamery & Restaurant

This long-operating ice cream destination (in its current location since the '60s) is known for its black and tan sundaes and for possibly being the birthplace of rocky road ice cream. Opened: 1894. [Photo]

Huber's Cafe

The oldest restaurant in Portland, OR still delivers on its signature dishes. Eater PDX writes: "As old as it is, the gorgeous mahogany-stained interior topped with arched stained-glass skylights still packs in a steady crowd for its year-round traditional turkey dinner and flaming Spanish coffees." [Photo]

Jake's Famous Crawfish

This seafood destination is "practically a historic landmark," writes Eater PDX. The name of the game here is simply prepared fish from the Pacific Northwest. Opened: 1892. [Photo]

Katz's Delicatessen