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Diners seated at outdoor tables beneath shady trees.
Outdoor seating at Viktualienmarkt market.
Alexandre Rotenberg/Shutterstock

The 30 Essential Munich Restaurants

Schnitzel and fresh-tapped beer at a century-old pub, a Michelin-starred tasting menu at a stylish hotel, a salad gone viral at a young hot spot, a late-night stop for currywurst and chips, and more of Munich’s best meals

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Outdoor seating at Viktualienmarkt market.
| Alexandre Rotenberg/Shutterstock

Thanks to its international association with the famous Oktoberfest celebration, Munich immediately conjures up images of raucous beer halls and traditional inns, where servers pass out plates laden with meat, dumplings, and gravy. The reputation is only reinforced by the city’s strong culinary overlaps with the rich foods of the nearby Alps and southern neighbor Austria.

But hearty local fare doesn’t represent the full picture of this large city. Like any European metropolis, Munich sees global trends trickle through its food scene, while international restaurants serve Japanese and Korean tasting menus, colorful Lebanese sandwiches, Indian street food specialties, and other dishes from around the world. A healthy slate of new openings keeps diners entertained without overwhelming, though the buzz around the best spots does necessitate reservations.

Still, the classic pubs are a good place to start to get to know the city. At first glance, they all follow a similar format — with wood paneling, staff in Bavarian clothing, and drinks in tankards — but they actually vary greatly. There are those with a modern feel, those catering to a more upmarket crowd, and others that haven’t changed in decades. Whether in pubs or restaurants or even at market stalls, local chefs excel the most when looking inward, reinventing dishes ingrained in Munich’s identity, or working with the abundance of small producers found across the region. So raise a glass, or a full liter of beer, to this often unexpected city and all it has to offer.

Kate Mann is a freelance writer based in Munich covering food, travel, and current affairs.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

La Bohème

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At Michael Urban’s lavish steak restaurant, the fine cuts of meat are flambeed at your table. Part of a new-build complex in the north of Schwabing, the ground-floor setting has exposed brick walls, a black ceiling, and red leather booths. The bold decor and fiery showstoppers make for a special occasion rather than a quick dinner. To get an idea of the price, the weekend brunch buffet, featuring caviar and martinis, will set you back by almost 100 euros.  

An airy restaurant dining room with an exposed brick wall printed with the words Vote Against Prohibition, with leather booths and bar seats.
The interior at La Bohème.
La Bohème

Görreshof Wirtshaus

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Serving hungry passersby since 1893, this traditional pub is one of the oldest in the city and a great spot to sample some local staples. Tuck into the roast pork with crispy cracklings; the sausage salad with red onion and gherkins; or the Münchner schnitzel with a horseradish and mustard crust. Even if you’re not hungry, it’s worth popping in for a refreshing beer; the staff regularly taps the Augustiner straight from a wooden barrel. Found in the student district of Maxvorstadt, this place manages to feel timeless in an ever-changing part of town.

A plate of meat topped with frizzled fried onions.
Veal and pork patties with dark beer sauce, mashed potatoes, and fried onions.
Görreshof Wirtshaus

Julius Brantner Brothandwerk

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Featured on menus across Munich, young baker Julius Brantner is ingrained in the local restaurant scene thanks to his sterling sourdough. With a contemporary design and just a few products on display, his two bakeries look nothing like most others in the city. Head over for the organic rye bread with fermented apples, but arrive early if you want to try the daily specials; the cinnamon buns and almond croissants sell out especially quickly. Julius can often be spotted out back, kneading dough, folding pastry, or checking the ovens.

A baker holds a dark loaf sliced in half.
A fresh loaf from Julius Brantner.
Kathrin Koschitzki

Broeding

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This understated leader in the Munich dining scene has been in business for more than 30 years. Using top-quality produce sourced from local markets, farms, and producers, head chef Manuel Reheis and his team come up with a daily six-course menu. The cheese plate makes regular appearances, bearing a selection from award-winning Allgäu affineur Thomas Breckle. The wine list is the result of long-established relationships and new connections with skilled vintners, most of them from Austria.

Mamma Bao

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Queues outside restaurants aren’t all that common in the city, but you’ll often spot people gathered outside this eatery in Maxvorstadt. Mamma Bao doesn’t take reservations for its much-hyped bowls of biang biang noodles, which are hand-pulled by specially trained chefs from northern China. Opened by Munich-born Ying Xu in 2022, the restaurant feels sleek and sophisticated, but the vibe is relaxed. Try the top seller with beef, tomato, and egg.

Wirtshaus Eder

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This easygoing pub in the hip district of Westend stands out for its drink selection. Working with some of Munich’s best craft breweries — including Tilmans Biere and Hopfenhäcker Brauerei — manager Johann Eder offers an ever-changing selection on tap and in bottles. You’ll also find single-malt whiskey Slyrs, which is distilled in the Alpine foothills. You can pair your booze with some comforting grub, including veal goulash or fleischpflanzerl (pan-fried meatballs). If you turn up when it’s busy, you may end up at a shared table — an ideal opportunity to exchange notes on the different beers.

Café Frischhut

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This old-school cafe in the center of town can seem very touristy at times, but it’s also a lovable, enduring part of Munich’s furniture. It has churned out deep-fried pastries since 1973, when late hours made it a hangout for partygoers after a night out. Sitting side by side with people grabbing breakfast before an early shift at work, they would sip average coffee and sober up on schmalznudel, Bavaria’s version of a doughnut. Today, service starts later and the clientele has changed, but otherwise it feels much the same.

L’Oca Bianca

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Munich’s first Venetian cicchetteria (small plates bar) is the go-to place for an aperitivo. Make a stop at this part-deli, part-bar for a glass of fizz and a choice of appetizing bites straight out of Italy. Bread and polenta slices come with various toppings, including sarde in saor (pickled sardines) or Gorgonzola cream. For something more substantial, come at lunchtime for filled focaccia or dishes such as burrata with blood orange, red cabbage, and pistachio.

A panini overflowing with prosciutto.
Panini at L’Oca Bianca.
L’Oca Bianca

Marktpatisserie Lea Zapf

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Lea Zapf runs a patisserie in Viktualienmarkt, one of Munich’s oldest food markets. In about 100 square feet, she makes a small selection of delicate cakes and pastries that she lines up neatly in the display case out front. Her signature Luftikus is a kind of choux bun stuffed with fillings like pistachio cream and lemon curd. One of more than 100 stalls, Zapf’s shop is easy to spot thanks to the black-and-white-striped canopy and inviting, cushion-laden ledge that runs along two sides.

A pastry bun on a plate topped with a swoop of white cream.
The Luftikus from Marktpatisserie Lea Zapf.
Annette Sandner

Caspar Plautz

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Putting the spotlight on simple spuds at their hugely popular market stall in Viktualienmarkt, Theo Lindinger and Dominik Klier rustle up baked potatoes with toppings that show off the region’s produce and reflect the time of year. (It feels like the unofficial start to the season when the duo releases the shop’s summer or winter menu.) This year’s highlights include the Caesars Sebald with fennel, Parmesan, capers, and flaky smoked fish from Lake Starnberg, as well as the gado-gado with coconut milk, pak choi, and green beans.

A diner slices into a baked potato with toppings.
Creative spuds at Caspar Plautz.
Liska Henglein

Madam Chutney

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Dishing up delights from Delhi and beyond, this large Indian restaurant was once a small in-the-know spot on the northern edge of town. With an emphasis on street food, owner Prateek Reen wanted to present dishes that were hard to find in Munich. After moving to the inner city, the restaurant shifted focus toward more readily available curries, but the kitchen still uses Reen’s old family recipes combined with handmade spice mixes. The snacky options remain the stars, such as the pea and potato samosas and the papri chaat with yogurt, mint, and tamarind chutney.

A metal plate of papri chaat on a marble counter with chai and a menu.
Papri chaat from the starter menu.
Madam Chutney

Xaver's

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Siblings Jakob, Theresa, and Xaver Portenlänger were all under 30 in 2018 when they bought a pub and spruced it up into Xaver’s, updating both the food and the culture of the traditional Bavarian style. The trio, whose family has run the Alter Wirt hotel in the Bavarian countryside since 1919, built on their long history in local gastronomy to create an exciting menu and vibe. Surrounded by dark green walls and velvet upholstery, guests can tuck into dishes such as lamb shank with parsnips and charred leeks, as well as a number of vegetarian and vegan options.

Mun Restaurant

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Named after Korean head chef Mun Kim, this upscale Asian fusion restaurant in a Haidhausen basement is a must for sushi fans. Turning to professional cooking later in life, Kim trained under prominent Japanese chef Makoto Okuwa before honing his skills through his own ventures. Diners at Mun can choose from an omakase menu of delicate sushi, or they can sample a mix of Korean and Japanese cuisine in a tasting menu featuring both fish and meat dishes, such as rib-eye steak with kimchi and black rice. If you’d prefer a completely vegan option, just let the restaurant know 48 hours in advance.

Slices of bright sashimi mounded in a deep dish.
Sashimi.
David Koplin

Biergarten am Muffatwerk

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Summer doesn’t feel like summer in Munich without a crunchy radish salad or a portion of creamy obatzda (Camembert with butter and paprika) in a beer garden. While the quality of food can vary from beer garden to garden, this spot adjacent to the banks of the river Isar is consistently good, and the ingredients are organic. With “only” 400 seats, it also offers a more intimate setting than many other beer gardens. Order the bratwurst with sauerkraut or the trout with rosemary potatoes, and grab some of the preprepared snacky options, too.

Customers at standing tables beneath umbrellas and at an outdoor bar beneath a night sky.
An evening in the beer garden.
Muffatwerk Biergarten

Sorry Johnny Kaffeebar

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Oozing cool, Sorry Johnny matches style with sustenance. People are willing to cross town for the cheese scones, French toast with ricotta and jam, or sourdough topped with beetroot, avocado, and hummus. The compact space is dominated by the coffee station, where barista Florian Vogt uses beans from local roaster Merchant & Friends to produce smooth flat whites, espresso tonics, and other creations, all listed in scribbles on the tiles behind the bar. Katrin Brüggemann keeps things running smoothly, and the eponymous Johnny (Johannes Rühl) is in charge of the kitchen.

True & 12 Handmade Ice Cream

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True & 12 is the cream of the crop when it comes to Munich’s ice cream parlors. Owners Davina Goldammer Utz and Rony Utz painstakingly develop the 12 available flavors, which are all made from scratch using milk sourced from grass-fed cows. Rather than relying on bases or powders, the duo sticks to directly imported raw materials, such as hazelnuts and pistachios from Italy. Look out for the lavender with black currant swirl, made by infusing milk with lavender buds overnight.

Scoops of light green ice cream in small dishes, served on a metal platter with a bowl of pistachios.
Scoops of pistachio ice cream.
Davina Goldammer

Fink's Südtiroler Knödelküche

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The knödel (bread-based dumplings) and South Tyrolean wine at Fink’s transport you straight to the mountains of northeastern Italy. Doused in melted butter and plenty of Parmesan (as they should be), the dumplings come in classic forms — made with beetroot, cheese, speck, or spinach — as well as more experimental variations such as chard and walnuts. The restaurant is part of a family business that includes similar outlets in Zurich and Bolzano, Italy.

Dumplings in various colors.
A trio of dumplings from Fink’s.
Julian Bueckers

Bergwolf

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You know you’ve had a good evening if you end up chatting with friends and strangers at this legendary late-night food joint. There is a menu, but most people come in for the same thing: currywurst and chips. This no-frills snack from Berlin consists of slices of sausage covered in curry ketchup, and it tastes best when eaten from a paper plate with a mini wooden fork. Bergwolf is located right next to the subway station at Fraunhoferstraße, making it a convenient place to pass a weekend night if you’re waiting for the trains to start running again around 4 a.m.

Bingo Bistro

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Not everywhere can get away with serving a full head of lettuce as a starter to share, but Bingo Bistro does so with style — earning it a bit of social media hype. Topped with chives and served with croutons and dressing on the side, the dish is one of around 10 at this hot spot in the cool Glockenbach district. The rest of the menu has a slight French influence combined with strong regional touches; local suppliers are listed on the back of the menu. When reserving a table, bear in mind that the earlier seating might provide better lighting for a salad photo shoot.

Doctor Drooly

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Some vegan restaurants in Munich can feel like they’re ticking boxes on a generic menu rather than cooking creatively, but not Dr. Drooly. This laid-back pizza place in Isarvorstadt offers fun combinations of plant-based toppings and dough that is left to ferment for 54 hours. Jana and Salvatore Stacca opened the shop in 2020 not long before the COVID-19 pandemic, and they’ve relied on takeaway orders ever since. While there are a few seats available, most people prefer to eat their dinner off the premises, straight from one of the bright-pink cardboard boxes seen piled high behind the counter.

Gasthaus Waltz

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Serving elevated Austrian dishes, this smart inn will soon have you hooked on the country’s cuisine. Not-to-miss dishes include the venison sausages, served with chanterelle mushrooms and cranberries, and the Steirisches backhendl (Styrian fried chicken) with potato and watercress salad. Opened in 2023, the Gasthaus is run by Markus Hirschler and Stefan Grabler, who first made a name for themselves at wine bar Grapes, which helps explain the huge selection of bottles at the inn. Inside, light wood combined with green chairs and statement lighting provide a rustic feeling without the slightest hint of kitsch.

A restaurant interior with bright wooden floors, tables, and an accent wall lined with bottles.
A modern Austrian inn.
Rocka Studio

On a cold day, this candlelit restaurant in the charming French Quarter feels like a cozy living room. When it’s warmer, outdoor seating spills out onto Pariser Platz. Proud promoters of local produce, the Polka team works to create a diverse mix of share plates. Recent options included cauliflower with turmeric, tahini, and feta and herring with cucumber, caper berries, and sour cream. The dessert menu is small but always includes a one-Euro chocolate truffle to sway those who normally skip straight to coffee. 

A dark wood bar with stools, in front of a two-tone cream and teal back bar.
The bar at Polka.
Maiwolf Photography

This elegant bar in the Glockenbach district serves creative, tapas-style dishes and a large selection of wines from Germany and beyond. Any questions about the drinks should be directed to sommelier Lukas Stepper, who owns Avin together with his friend Alexander Glocker. Stepper can suggest a glass that goes best with your beef tartare with crostini and pickled egg yolk or your caramelized eggplant with bonito and miso. Spread across two levels, Avin has a minimalist yet cozy feel thanks to the use of clean lines and warm tones.

A glimpse of a bar, through a dining room and doorway.
A view of the bar at Avin.
Rocka Studio

Café Faber

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Having gained a loyal fan base as a pop-up breakfast spot, Café Faber quickly filled up with customers when it opened permanent doors earlier this year. Leon Hänseler uses his experience from third-wave coffee shops across Germany to command the espresso machine, while Hannah Gratzfeld prepares brunch and lunch dishes, such as beans with feta, wild herbs, and a poached egg. Dotted with potted plants and linoleum-covered tables, the new digs still attract a hipster crowd, but the space is a good option for anyone looking for a nourishing start to the day.

Paulaner am Nockherberg

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This modern-looking restaurant is connected to the Paulaner brewery, one of the biggest names in Munich’s beer scene. Centered on the shiny brass brew kettles behind the bar, the space is flooded with natural light streaming in from large windows. The food is beautifully presented, including the brotzeit platter full of meats, cheeses, and spreads, which is ideal for sharing. To drink? Paulaner, of course, including a number of seasonal specials. When the weather’s good, the beer garden is a lively spot for a sundowner.

Boazeria Giesing

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You can lose track of the hours at a Munich boazn. These small, often dimly lit bars are some of the city’s best drinking spots, the types of places where it’s hard to resist making friends, especially with a charismatic landlord or lady. In 2022, three Giesing lads, Maximilian Heisler, Philipp Steenbock, and Richard Strobl, opened what they define as a mix of a boazn and an Italian birrieria. Boazeria (see what they did there?) offers spritzes, craft beer, and bruschetta, as well as a gentle introduction to a lesser-known side of Munich’s beer culture.

Gaststätte Großmarkthalle

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To start the day in true Bavarian style, you’ll need to try a weißwurstfrühstück (white sausage breakfast): Traditionally served until noon, the dish consists of white sausages, sweet mustard, doughy pretzels, and a glass or two of wheat beer. Residents are divided on the best purveyor, but many suggest Gaststätte Großmarkthalle. This Munich institution, found among the buildings at the city’s large wholesale market, makes its own sausages on site and is usually packed to the rafters on weekends. Lederhosen optional.

An outdoor seating area with tables beneath umbrellas advertising Paulaner brewery and shady trees.
The patio at Gaststätte Großmarkthalle.
Gaststätte Großmarkthalle

Beirutbeirut

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Pink pickles and vibrant greens characterize the sandwiches and plates from this much-loved Lebanese cafe in Sendling. Combined with house-made hummus, baba ghanoush, or falafel, the fresh flavors here are hard to beat, although sister restaurant Manouche (located a few minutes away) comes pretty close with its light Lebanese pizzas. If you want to try food from both locations, the teams don’t mind if you bring items from one to the other.

A bowl of falafel topped with sauce, surrounded by pickled vegetables and other dishes.
Falafel at Beirutbeirut.
Beirutbeirut

Der Dantler

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Offering fine dining with a casual edge, Giesing’s gastronomic gem is found pumping out a hip-hop soundtrack on an otherwise quiet street. The attentive waitstaff arrive at tables in sneakers and sweatshirts and bearing well-rehearsed details about every dish. The lunch menu is small but includes the best pastrami sandwiches in town, while the evening brings a set menu featuring European dishes with occasional Asian influences. Limited opening hours require some planning, especially if you want to visit the wine bar next door, which is open only on Thursdays.

An unseen hand dollops a cream onto an ornately composed vegetable dish.
Fine dining at Der Dantler.
Rocka Studio

Mural Farmhouse

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When not in the kitchen, young chef Rico Birndt, formerly of Pasture in New Zealand, can often be found tending to a vegetable garden on the roof of the WunderLocke hotel. The stylish new property, in the depths of Sendling, is home to the Michelin-starred restaurant Mural Farmhouse. Using hyperlocal ingredients and working with producers committed to natural cultivation and animal welfare, Birndt’s team creates various menus, including a 14-course fine dining experience. The restaurant is part of Team Mural, which has a few other spots in the city.

A charred onion dish.
A dish at Michelin-starred Mural.
Lenka Li Lilling

La Bohème

At Michael Urban’s lavish steak restaurant, the fine cuts of meat are flambeed at your table. Part of a new-build complex in the north of Schwabing, the ground-floor setting has exposed brick walls, a black ceiling, and red leather booths. The bold decor and fiery showstoppers make for a special occasion rather than a quick dinner. To get an idea of the price, the weekend brunch buffet, featuring caviar and martinis, will set you back by almost 100 euros.  

An airy restaurant dining room with an exposed brick wall printed with the words Vote Against Prohibition, with leather booths and bar seats.
The interior at La Bohème.
La Bohème

Görreshof Wirtshaus

Serving hungry passersby since 1893, this traditional pub is one of the oldest in the city and a great spot to sample some local staples. Tuck into the roast pork with crispy cracklings; the sausage salad with red onion and gherkins; or the Münchner schnitzel with a horseradish and mustard crust. Even if you’re not hungry, it’s worth popping in for a refreshing beer; the staff regularly taps the Augustiner straight from a wooden barrel. Found in the student district of Maxvorstadt, this place manages to feel timeless in an ever-changing part of town.

A plate of meat topped with frizzled fried onions.
Veal and pork patties with dark beer sauce, mashed potatoes, and fried onions.
Görreshof Wirtshaus

Julius Brantner Brothandwerk

Featured on menus across Munich, young baker Julius Brantner is ingrained in the local restaurant scene thanks to his sterling sourdough. With a contemporary design and just a few products on display, his two bakeries look nothing like most others in the city. Head over for the organic rye bread with fermented apples, but arrive early if you want to try the daily specials; the cinnamon buns and almond croissants sell out especially quickly. Julius can often be spotted out back, kneading dough, folding pastry, or checking the ovens.

A baker holds a dark loaf sliced in half.
A fresh loaf from Julius Brantner.
Kathrin Koschitzki

Broeding

This understated leader in the Munich dining scene has been in business for more than 30 years. Using top-quality produce sourced from local markets, farms, and producers, head chef Manuel Reheis and his team come up with a daily six-course menu. The cheese plate makes regular appearances, bearing a selection from award-winning Allgäu affineur Thomas Breckle. The wine list is the result of long-established relationships and new connections with skilled vintners, most of them from Austria.

Mamma Bao

Queues outside restaurants aren’t all that common in the city, but you’ll often spot people gathered outside this eatery in Maxvorstadt. Mamma Bao doesn’t take reservations for its much-hyped bowls of biang biang noodles, which are hand-pulled by specially trained chefs from northern China. Opened by Munich-born Ying Xu in 2022, the restaurant feels sleek and sophisticated, but the vibe is relaxed. Try the top seller with beef, tomato, and egg.

Wirtshaus Eder

This easygoing pub in the hip district of Westend stands out for its drink selection. Working with some of Munich’s best craft breweries — including Tilmans Biere and Hopfenhäcker Brauerei — manager Johann Eder offers an ever-changing selection on tap and in bottles. You’ll also find single-malt whiskey Slyrs, which is distilled in the Alpine foothills. You can pair your booze with some comforting grub, including veal goulash or fleischpflanzerl (pan-fried meatballs). If you turn up when it’s busy, you may end up at a shared table — an ideal opportunity to exchange notes on the different beers.

Café Frischhut

This old-school cafe in the center of town can seem very touristy at times, but it’s also a lovable, enduring part of Munich’s furniture. It has churned out deep-fried pastries since 1973, when late hours made it a hangout for partygoers after a night out. Sitting side by side with people grabbing breakfast before an early shift at work, they would sip average coffee and sober up on schmalznudel, Bavaria’s version of a doughnut. Today, service starts later and the clientele has changed, but otherwise it feels much the same.

L’Oca Bianca

Munich’s first Venetian cicchetteria (small plates bar) is the go-to place for an aperitivo. Make a stop at this part-deli, part-bar for a glass of fizz and a choice of appetizing bites straight out of Italy. Bread and polenta slices come with various toppings, including sarde in saor (pickled sardines) or Gorgonzola cream. For something more substantial, come at lunchtime for filled focaccia or dishes such as burrata with blood orange, red cabbage, and pistachio.

A panini overflowing with prosciutto.
Panini at L’Oca Bianca.
L’Oca Bianca

Marktpatisserie Lea Zapf

Lea Zapf runs a patisserie in Viktualienmarkt, one of Munich’s oldest food markets. In about 100 square feet, she makes a small selection of delicate cakes and pastries that she lines up neatly in the display case out front. Her signature Luftikus is a kind of choux bun stuffed with fillings like pistachio cream and lemon curd. One of more than 100 stalls, Zapf’s shop is easy to spot thanks to the black-and-white-striped canopy and inviting, cushion-laden ledge that runs along two sides.

A pastry bun on a plate topped with a swoop of white cream.
The Luftikus from Marktpatisserie Lea Zapf.
Annette Sandner

Caspar Plautz

Putting the spotlight on simple spuds at their hugely popular market stall in Viktualienmarkt, Theo Lindinger and Dominik Klier rustle up baked potatoes with toppings that show off the region’s produce and reflect the time of year. (It feels like the unofficial start to the season when the duo releases the shop’s summer or winter menu.) This year’s highlights include the Caesars Sebald with fennel, Parmesan, capers, and flaky smoked fish from Lake Starnberg, as well as the gado-gado with coconut milk, pak choi, and green beans.

A diner slices into a baked potato with toppings.
Creative spuds at Caspar Plautz.
Liska Henglein

Madam Chutney

Dishing up delights from Delhi and beyond, this large Indian restaurant was once a small in-the-know spot on the northern edge of town. With an emphasis on street food, owner Prateek Reen wanted to present dishes that were hard to find in Munich. After moving to the inner city, the restaurant shifted focus toward more readily available curries, but the kitchen still uses Reen’s old family recipes combined with handmade spice mixes. The snacky options remain the stars, such as the pea and potato samosas and the papri chaat with yogurt, mint, and tamarind chutney.

A metal plate of papri chaat on a marble counter with chai and a menu.
Papri chaat from the starter menu.
Madam Chutney

Xaver's

Siblings Jakob, Theresa, and Xaver Portenlänger were all under 30 in 2018 when they bought a pub and spruced it up into Xaver’s, updating both the food and the culture of the traditional Bavarian style. The trio, whose family has run the Alter Wirt hotel in the Bavarian countryside since 1919, built on their long history in local gastronomy to create an exciting menu and vibe. Surrounded by dark green walls and velvet upholstery, guests can tuck into dishes such as lamb shank with parsnips and charred leeks, as well as a number of vegetarian and vegan options.

Mun Restaurant

Named after Korean head chef Mun Kim, this upscale Asian fusion restaurant in a Haidhausen basement is a must for sushi fans. Turning to professional cooking later in life, Kim trained under prominent Japanese chef Makoto Okuwa before honing his skills through his own ventures. Diners at Mun can choose from an omakase menu of delicate sushi, or they can sample a mix of Korean and Japanese cuisine in a tasting menu featuring both fish and meat dishes, such as rib-eye steak with kimchi and black rice. If you’d prefer a completely vegan option, just let the restaurant know 48 hours in advance.

Slices of bright sashimi mounded in a deep dish.
Sashimi.
David Koplin

Biergarten am Muffatwerk

Summer doesn’t feel like summer in Munich without a crunchy radish salad or a portion of creamy obatzda (Camembert with butter and paprika) in a beer garden. While the quality of food can vary from beer garden to garden, this spot adjacent to the banks of the river Isar is consistently good, and the ingredients are organic. With “only” 400 seats, it also offers a more intimate setting than many other beer gardens. Order the bratwurst with sauerkraut or the trout with rosemary potatoes, and grab some of the preprepared snacky options, too.

Customers at standing tables beneath umbrellas and at an outdoor bar beneath a night sky.
An evening in the beer garden.
Muffatwerk Biergarten

Sorry Johnny Kaffeebar

Oozing cool, Sorry Johnny matches style with sustenance. People are willing to cross town for the cheese scones, French toast with ricotta and jam, or sourdough topped with beetroot, avocado, and hummus. The compact space is dominated by the coffee station, where barista Florian Vogt uses beans from local roaster Merchant & Friends to produce smooth flat whites, espresso tonics, and other creations, all listed in scribbles on the tiles behind the bar. Katrin Brüggemann keeps things running smoothly, and the eponymous Johnny (Johannes Rühl) is in charge of the kitchen.

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True & 12 Handmade Ice Cream

True & 12 is the cream of the crop when it comes to Munich’s ice cream parlors. Owners Davina Goldammer Utz and Rony Utz painstakingly develop the 12 available flavors, which are all made from scratch using milk sourced from grass-fed cows. Rather than relying on bases or powders, the duo sticks to directly imported raw materials, such as hazelnuts and pistachios from Italy. Look out for the lavender with black currant swirl, made by infusing milk with lavender buds overnight.

Scoops of light green ice cream in small dishes, served on a metal platter with a bowl of pistachios.
Scoops of pistachio ice cream.
Davina Goldammer

Fink's Südtiroler Knödelküche

The knödel (bread-based dumplings) and South Tyrolean wine at Fink’s transport you straight to the mountains of northeastern Italy. Doused in melted butter and plenty of Parmesan (as they should be), the dumplings come in classic forms — made with beetroot, cheese, speck, or spinach — as well as more experimental variations such as chard and walnuts. The restaurant is part of a family business that includes similar outlets in Zurich and Bolzano, Italy.

Dumplings in various colors.
A trio of dumplings from Fink’s.
Julian Bueckers

Bergwolf

You know you’ve had a good evening if you end up chatting with friends and strangers at this legendary late-night food joint. There is a menu, but most people come in for the same thing: currywurst and chips. This no-frills snack from Berlin consists of slices of sausage covered in curry ketchup, and it tastes best when eaten from a paper plate with a mini wooden fork. Bergwolf is located right next to the subway station at Fraunhoferstraße, making it a convenient place to pass a weekend night if you’re waiting for the trains to start running again around 4 a.m.

Bingo Bistro

Not everywhere can get away with serving a full head of lettuce as a starter to share, but Bingo Bistro does so with style — earning it a bit of social media hype. Topped with chives and served with croutons and dressing on the side, the dish is one of around 10 at this hot spot in the cool Glockenbach district. The rest of the menu has a slight French influence combined with strong regional touches; local suppliers are listed on the back of the menu. When reserving a table, bear in mind that the earlier seating might provide better lighting for a salad photo shoot.

Doctor Drooly

Some vegan restaurants in Munich can feel like they’re ticking boxes on a generic menu rather than cooking creatively, but not Dr. Drooly. This laid-back pizza place in Isarvorstadt offers fun combinations of plant-based toppings and dough that is left to ferment for 54 hours. Jana and Salvatore Stacca opened the shop in 2020 not long before the COVID-19 pandemic, and they’ve relied on takeaway orders ever since. While there are a few seats available, most people prefer to eat their dinner off the premises, straight from one of the bright-pink cardboard boxes seen piled high behind the counter.

Gasthaus Waltz

Serving elevated Austrian dishes, this smart inn will soon have you hooked on the country’s cuisine. Not-to-miss dishes include the venison sausages, served with chanterelle mushrooms and cranberries, and the Steirisches backhendl (Styrian fried chicken) with potato and watercress salad. Opened in 2023, the Gasthaus is run by Markus Hirschler and Stefan Grabler, who first made a name for themselves at wine bar Grapes, which helps explain the huge selection of bottles at the inn. Inside, light wood combined with green chairs and statement lighting provide a rustic feeling without the slightest hint of kitsch.

A restaurant interior with bright wooden floors, tables, and an accent wall lined with bottles.
A modern Austrian inn.
Rocka Studio

Polka

On a cold day, this candlelit restaurant in the charming French Quarter feels like a cozy living room. When it’s warmer, outdoor seating spills out onto Pariser Platz. Proud promoters of local produce, the Polka team works to create a diverse mix of share plates. Recent options included cauliflower with turmeric, tahini, and feta and herring with cucumber, caper berries, and sour cream. The dessert menu is small but always includes a one-Euro chocolate truffle to sway those who normally skip straight to coffee. 

A dark wood bar with stools, in front of a two-tone cream and teal back bar.
The bar at Polka.
Maiwolf Photography

Avin

This elegant bar in the Glockenbach district serves creative, tapas-style dishes and a large selection of wines from Germany and beyond. Any questions about the drinks should be directed to sommelier Lukas Stepper, who owns Avin together with his friend Alexander Glocker. Stepper can suggest a glass that goes best with your beef tartare with crostini and pickled egg yolk or your caramelized eggplant with bonito and miso. Spread across two levels, Avin has a minimalist yet cozy feel thanks to the use of clean lines and warm tones.

A glimpse of a bar, through a dining room and doorway.
A view of the bar at Avin.
Rocka Studio

Café Faber

Having gained a loyal fan base as a pop-up breakfast spot, Café Faber quickly filled up with customers when it opened permanent doors earlier this year. Leon Hänseler uses his experience from third-wave coffee shops across Germany to command the espresso machine, while Hannah Gratzfeld prepares brunch and lunch dishes, such as beans with feta, wild herbs, and a poached egg. Dotted with potted plants and linoleum-covered tables, the new digs still attract a hipster crowd, but the space is a good option for anyone looking for a nourishing start to the day.

Paulaner am Nockherberg

This modern-looking restaurant is connected to the Paulaner brewery, one of the biggest names in Munich’s beer scene. Centered on the shiny brass brew kettles behind the bar, the space is flooded with natural light streaming in from large windows. The food is beautifully presented, including the brotzeit platter full of meats, cheeses, and spreads, which is ideal for sharing. To drink? Paulaner, of course, including a number of seasonal specials. When the weather’s good, the beer garden is a lively spot for a sundowner.

Boazeria Giesing

You can lose track of the hours at a Munich boazn. These small, often dimly lit bars are some of the city’s best drinking spots, the types of places where it’s hard to resist making friends, especially with a charismatic landlord or lady. In 2022, three Giesing lads, Maximilian Heisler, Philipp Steenbock, and Richard Strobl, opened what they define as a mix of a boazn and an Italian birrieria. Boazeria (see what they did there?) offers spritzes, craft beer, and bruschetta, as well as a gentle introduction to a lesser-known side of Munich’s beer culture.

Gaststätte Großmarkthalle

To start the day in true Bavarian style, you’ll need to try a weißwurstfrühstück (white sausage breakfast): Traditionally served until noon, the dish consists of white sausages, sweet mustard, doughy pretzels, and a glass or two of wheat beer. Residents are divided on the best purveyor, but many suggest Gaststätte Großmarkthalle. This Munich institution, found among the buildings at the city’s large wholesale market, makes its own sausages on site and is usually packed to the rafters on weekends. Lederhosen optional.