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Daniela Galarza

Mexico City Neighborhood Guide: Coyoacán

Ten kilometers south of the city's most fashionable districts lies this lush borough worth at least a day

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Ten kilometers south of the city's most fashionable districts lies Coyoacán, a delegación (similar to a borough, but with its own elected officials) composed of nearly 100 different colonias, or neighborhoods. Coyoacán was the first official suburb of Ciudad de México before it was incorporated into the city in 1928. It houses several main attractions, including the lush Vivero Coyoacán, the city's tree nursery and a public park; the Frida Kahlo museum; the Universidad Autónomo de México, the largest university south of the U.S.; and two side-by-side public squares, Plaza Jardín Hidalgo and Jardín Centenario, which attract local families, reckless teens, immigrant merchants, street food lovers, and, yes, tourists.

See guides to all of Mexico City's greatest neighborhoods — plus everything you need to know about eating in DF, one of the best food cities in the world — in the Eater Guide to Mexico City.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

El Portón del Pan

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A bit north of Coyoacán proper, this no-frills hole in the wall bakery makes one of the city’s best chocolate conchas. The pineapple danish, cinnamon pinwheels, and pan francés are also great.

Los Chupacabras

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The tacos a la plancha at this spot under the main highway are the ultimate in late night taco feasting. They draw a mixed crowd of university students along with local bar hoppers. Go after midnight for the full experience, and don't skimp on the free beans, papas, salsas, and pickled peppers.

Rafaella

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A recently expanded cafe a few blocks from the Frida Kahlo museum, this indoor-outdoor space serves excellent coffee and good conchas; beware, the chocolate conchas run out first. A menu of savory lunch items is also available.

Mercado de Coyoacán

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When it comes to markets in DF, everyone recommends that tourists visit Mercado de San Juan, which has been successfully branded as the market where all the chefs shop. But the truth is, most of Mexico City’s markets carry similarly wonderful selections of fresh, exotic meats and produce, and Coyocán’s market is no exception. Plus, it also has some exceptionally good tostada joints.

La Cocina de Mi Mamá

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Deep within the gut of the Mercado de Coyoacán is this stall that serves homespun Mexican fonda-style food amid the cacophony of a day market. Bowls of salsas and pitchers of jamaica (iced hibiscus tea) are set out on the checkered tablecloths for self-service, but sit at the bar for the best view. Every day the owners post the options for the day's three-course meal (70 pesos) on the restaurant's Facebook page.

La Barraca Valenciana

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One of the best torterias in the city is an average-looking Spanish restaurant off the busy north-south Avenida Centenario. The most popular torta is the one filled with salted cod (bacalao). Its umami richness is offset by a sweet salsa of roasted tomatoes. It now also has an offshoot in the hipster-friendly Mercado Roma.

Churrería La Parroquia

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Everyone loves Churrería Moro — and it’s worth a visit for the experience alone — but in terms of quality and taste, the churros and hot chocolate here are far, far better.

Los Danzantes

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This charming restaurant is actually part of a mid-sized hospitality group with restaurants and bars in Oaxaca and DF. Though it's located right on the public square it's not a tourist trap. Standout dishes include the hoja santa (a sort of quesadilla but instead of tortillas they use hoja santa leaves), the cheese and chocolate plate, and all of the moles.

Los Sifones

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This quirky place is popular with the locals and those who work in the area. Legend has it the owners invented the (far more efficient!) square tortilla. Get the tacos arrachera or molcajetes calientes and enjoy the sometimes quirky, sometimes classy local art that decorates the walls.

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El Portón del Pan

A bit north of Coyoacán proper, this no-frills hole in the wall bakery makes one of the city’s best chocolate conchas. The pineapple danish, cinnamon pinwheels, and pan francés are also great.

Los Chupacabras

The tacos a la plancha at this spot under the main highway are the ultimate in late night taco feasting. They draw a mixed crowd of university students along with local bar hoppers. Go after midnight for the full experience, and don't skimp on the free beans, papas, salsas, and pickled peppers.

Rafaella

A recently expanded cafe a few blocks from the Frida Kahlo museum, this indoor-outdoor space serves excellent coffee and good conchas; beware, the chocolate conchas run out first. A menu of savory lunch items is also available.

Mercado de Coyoacán

When it comes to markets in DF, everyone recommends that tourists visit Mercado de San Juan, which has been successfully branded as the market where all the chefs shop. But the truth is, most of Mexico City’s markets carry similarly wonderful selections of fresh, exotic meats and produce, and Coyocán’s market is no exception. Plus, it also has some exceptionally good tostada joints.

La Cocina de Mi Mamá

Deep within the gut of the Mercado de Coyoacán is this stall that serves homespun Mexican fonda-style food amid the cacophony of a day market. Bowls of salsas and pitchers of jamaica (iced hibiscus tea) are set out on the checkered tablecloths for self-service, but sit at the bar for the best view. Every day the owners post the options for the day's three-course meal (70 pesos) on the restaurant's Facebook page.

La Barraca Valenciana

One of the best torterias in the city is an average-looking Spanish restaurant off the busy north-south Avenida Centenario. The most popular torta is the one filled with salted cod (bacalao). Its umami richness is offset by a sweet salsa of roasted tomatoes. It now also has an offshoot in the hipster-friendly Mercado Roma.

Churrería La Parroquia

Everyone loves Churrería Moro — and it’s worth a visit for the experience alone — but in terms of quality and taste, the churros and hot chocolate here are far, far better.

Los Danzantes

This charming restaurant is actually part of a mid-sized hospitality group with restaurants and bars in Oaxaca and DF. Though it's located right on the public square it's not a tourist trap. Standout dishes include the hoja santa (a sort of quesadilla but instead of tortillas they use hoja santa leaves), the cheese and chocolate plate, and all of the moles.

Los Sifones

This quirky place is popular with the locals and those who work in the area. Legend has it the owners invented the (far more efficient!) square tortilla. Get the tacos arrachera or molcajetes calientes and enjoy the sometimes quirky, sometimes classy local art that decorates the walls.

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