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The Best Cheap Eats in Toronto, Mapped

Follow host Lucas Peterson's culinary romp around The Six with this map of every place he stopped during Season 6 of Dining on a Dime: Toronto.

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For Dining on a Dime's first-ever international season, host Lucas Peterson traveled north of the border to Toronto to visit the best cheap eats spots the city has to offer. Toronto is the most populous city in Canada and one of the most culturally diverse on the planet, making it an ideal destination for sampling cuisines from all over the world.

From a sandwich shop specializing in bacon to a street festival where you can feast on Jamaican food to the oldest pho restaurant in Toronto, each point on this map indicates a stop on Peterson's whirlwind tour. Check them out and watch the corresponding episodes to take the journey along with him — or to plan your own.

Locations are listed chronologically, in the order they appeared on Dining of a Dime.

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Rashers

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Peterson's first stop this season is for a peameal bacon sandwich at this Toronto favorite. Peameal bacon, which is back bacon rolled in cornmeal, gets its name from an earlier version of the preparation, when the meat was rolled in ground peas for preservation purposes. Rashers offers sandwiches made with peameal, British-style, and streaky bacon, to satiate all the meat lovers of Hogtown.

Pho Rua Vang (Golden Turtle)

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Family-owned Pho Rua Vang, also known as Golden Turtle Restaurant, is the oldest pho restaurant in Toronto, serving traditional Vietnamese noodle soup as well as other dishes. Peterson meets with the owners and their children in this episode to learn about the establishment's history and the tale behind its name.

Crown Pastries

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The Scarborough district of Toronto is known for its ethnic diversity — more than half of the district’s residents are immigrants or foreign-born, which has led to a proliferation of different cuisines and restaurants. Peterson heads there in this episode to taste the Middle Eastern pastries at Crown Pastries, a small shop owned and operated by two brothers from Syria, Rasoul and Ismail Salha. The shop offers a variety of sweet and savory Syrian delicacies, many of which are variations of thinly rolled layers of phyllo dough stuffed with pistachios, walnuts, almonds, or other nuts.

Gandhi Cuisine

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Gandhi Roti in Toronto's Queen West neighborhood offers some of the spiciest, cheapest, most filling meals in the city. Here roti are tossed on the flat-top before being filled with various ingredients, from butter chicken to vegetable korma or West Indian curries. But be warned: as Peterson learns in this episode, when it comes to Gandhi Roti's spice levels, there's a big difference between medium and hot.

Torteria San Cosme

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Peterson heads to the famous Kensington Market district of downtown Toronto in this episode, to eat at Torteria San Cosme, which serves traditional Mexican sandwiches, called tortas. Opened by Mexico City-born chef Arturo Anhalt, San Cosme takes the often messy street food to a sit-down restaurant level.

York-Eglinton International Street Festival

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In this episode, Peterson hits up the York-Eglinton International Street Festival, a celebration of Toronto’s multiculturalism through music, dance, performances, and especially cuisine. Peterson focuses on the Caribbean aspect of the street fair, particularly the strong presence of many good Jamaican restaurants and street food offerings, like jerk chicken and stewed oxtail.

Hopper Hut

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The Sri Lankan fare at Hopper Hut draws Peterson to Ellesmere Road on this episode of Dining on a Dime. The establishment serves traditional Sri Lankan hoppers, a flat bread made with fermented butter and flavored with coconut milk. Other offerings include mutton curry, rice dishes, and lamprais: a mix of curries, frikkadels (meatballs), vegetables, and an egg, all wrapped in a banana leaf and baked in the oven.

Maha's Fine Egyptian Cuisine

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Maha Barsoom, the matriarch of the family and restaurant's namesake, serves as chef and owner (along with her husband) and runs day-to-day operations at Maha’s, a casual, family-owned and operated Egyptian restaurant in the Leslieville neighborhood — along with the help of her children, Monika and Mark. The restaurant is only a little over two years old but is already a neighborhood favorite, especially around brunch. Traditional offerings like ful are served alongside modern twists on familiar dishes, like a tahini-topped po' boy.

Rashers

Peterson's first stop this season is for a peameal bacon sandwich at this Toronto favorite. Peameal bacon, which is back bacon rolled in cornmeal, gets its name from an earlier version of the preparation, when the meat was rolled in ground peas for preservation purposes. Rashers offers sandwiches made with peameal, British-style, and streaky bacon, to satiate all the meat lovers of Hogtown.

Pho Rua Vang (Golden Turtle)

Family-owned Pho Rua Vang, also known as Golden Turtle Restaurant, is the oldest pho restaurant in Toronto, serving traditional Vietnamese noodle soup as well as other dishes. Peterson meets with the owners and their children in this episode to learn about the establishment's history and the tale behind its name.

Crown Pastries

The Scarborough district of Toronto is known for its ethnic diversity — more than half of the district’s residents are immigrants or foreign-born, which has led to a proliferation of different cuisines and restaurants. Peterson heads there in this episode to taste the Middle Eastern pastries at Crown Pastries, a small shop owned and operated by two brothers from Syria, Rasoul and Ismail Salha. The shop offers a variety of sweet and savory Syrian delicacies, many of which are variations of thinly rolled layers of phyllo dough stuffed with pistachios, walnuts, almonds, or other nuts.

Gandhi Cuisine

Gandhi Roti in Toronto's Queen West neighborhood offers some of the spiciest, cheapest, most filling meals in the city. Here roti are tossed on the flat-top before being filled with various ingredients, from butter chicken to vegetable korma or West Indian curries. But be warned: as Peterson learns in this episode, when it comes to Gandhi Roti's spice levels, there's a big difference between medium and hot.

Torteria San Cosme

Peterson heads to the famous Kensington Market district of downtown Toronto in this episode, to eat at Torteria San Cosme, which serves traditional Mexican sandwiches, called tortas. Opened by Mexico City-born chef Arturo Anhalt, San Cosme takes the often messy street food to a sit-down restaurant level.

York-Eglinton International Street Festival

In this episode, Peterson hits up the York-Eglinton International Street Festival, a celebration of Toronto’s multiculturalism through music, dance, performances, and especially cuisine. Peterson focuses on the Caribbean aspect of the street fair, particularly the strong presence of many good Jamaican restaurants and street food offerings, like jerk chicken and stewed oxtail.

Hopper Hut

The Sri Lankan fare at Hopper Hut draws Peterson to Ellesmere Road on this episode of Dining on a Dime. The establishment serves traditional Sri Lankan hoppers, a flat bread made with fermented butter and flavored with coconut milk. Other offerings include mutton curry, rice dishes, and lamprais: a mix of curries, frikkadels (meatballs), vegetables, and an egg, all wrapped in a banana leaf and baked in the oven.

Maha's Fine Egyptian Cuisine

Maha Barsoom, the matriarch of the family and restaurant's namesake, serves as chef and owner (along with her husband) and runs day-to-day operations at Maha’s, a casual, family-owned and operated Egyptian restaurant in the Leslieville neighborhood — along with the help of her children, Monika and Mark. The restaurant is only a little over two years old but is already a neighborhood favorite, especially around brunch. Traditional offerings like ful are served alongside modern twists on familiar dishes, like a tahini-topped po' boy.

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