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A chef arranges greens on top of two tacos in a prep area.
Tacos at Cariñito Tacos.
Andrew Reiner/Eater

The 19 Best Taquerías in Mexico City

From a 70-year-old institution for barbacoa and Norteño music to a fusion taquería serving pork belly in soy sauce with natural wine, here’s where to eat tacos in CDMX

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Tacos at Cariñito Tacos.
| Andrew Reiner/Eater

Mexico City is the epicenter of the taco universe. According to Mexico’s National Institute of Statistics and Geography, there’s a taquería every 1,200 feet in the city, a sign of Chilangos’ obsession with tacos. But it’s not just sheer quantity that distinguishes CDMX; the diversity of the taco scene is unparalleled, with every food tradition in the country represented by celebrated taquerías, creating a sort of taco melting pot of cooking techniques, styles, regionalisms, and ingredients.

The taco is forever evolving, and much of that growth happens in CDMX. Just look at tacos al pastor: Chilangos adopted tacos árabes from Puebla, applied a marinade of achiote and dry chiles, added a slice of pineapple, and gifted it back to the world as pastor. That evolution isn’t over; Mexico City is home to countless up-and-coming taco-centric projects showcasing new spins on traditions. Plus, the casual nature of the taco suits the fast pace of the city. Locals agree that the best taquerías are those where you eat standing up, ideally leaning on a counter by the wall or sitting on plastic stools on the curb.

This list covers most of the major taco styles, from traditional barbacoa, pastor, carnitas, and suadero to new styles and fusions wrapped in tortillas. Whatever your taco craving, CDMX has you covered.

Natalia de la Rosa is a Mexican food writer, mezcal collector, and culinary guide based in Mexico City.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Tacos La Bici

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A beacon on the north side of Mexico City, La Bici is a living example of many taqueros’ dream: to work hard and build a taco empire. The taqueros began selling tacos from a bicycle (which gives the taquería its name) but worked their way up to a large, buzzing storefront on a corner lot in Satélite. Costilla and guisado tacos are among the best options, but whatever you order, be sure to check out La Bici’s well-stocked salsa bar, which includes more than a dozen different styles: pico de gallo, guacamole, tomatillo, roja, guajillo, habanero, and more. For locals who judge taquerías by the quality and variety of salsas, the secret to La Bici’s success is obvious.

La Pingüica

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La Pingüica’s pastor taco has been the same since the beginning of time. The tiny taco overflows with morita salsa, the meat is charred from the unruly fire cooking the trompo, and sweet caramelized onions cover it all. The whole taco almost falls apart, requiring you shovel it within seconds. The taquería has remained a beloved spot for more than 40 years, mostly frequented by locals and in-the-know visitors. Don’t be shy when ordering, since each taco is usually gone after two bites.

Two cooks work around a trompo, charring from the heat of the fire in an open kitchen.
The trompo at la Pingüica.
Natalia de la Rosa

Tacos El Paisa

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Walk around the San Rafael neighborhood, and you might smell El Paisa’s bubbling taco cauldron half a block away. The taquería makes a statement with their suadero en trozo taco: chunky slices of slow-and-low cooked brisket that land in tortillas carefully crisped in oil, all topped with a bright red tomato salsa. Order your taco “con todo” as locals do, and don’t miss the confit onion offered as a courtesy; it’s soft, sweet, salty, and everything good that an onion can be.

Two tacos covered in salsa on a paper plate, which sits on a comal beside a large chef’s knife and chopped meat.
Suadero and longaniza tacos.
Natalia de la Rosa

El Turix

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The upscale Polanco neighborhood isn’t generally regarded as a taco destination in Mexico City, but the cochinita taco at El Turix justifies a visit. Juicy, tender, perfectly seasoned pork and a Yucatan-style achiote marinade are the keys to El Turix’s long-lasting popularity. Order a cochinita taco, a torta (if you want to go bigger), or the speciality, a panucho: a deep-fried tortilla stuffed with fried bean paste, topped with cochinita and red onion escabeche.

Los Cocuyos

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The most famous downtown taquería, Los Cocuyos keeps up an impressive operation 24/7 as diners gather on the short plastic stools on the curb at all hours. The shop specializes in suadero (brisket) and tripe cooked in a bubbly meat jacuzzi, as well as tacos de cabeza (steamed cow’s head). The Cocuyos technique is very basic; the tacos are cooked in lard confit seasoned just with salt, no herbs, and the master taqueros work patiently as they stir the cauldron, chop ingredients, and serve tacos until the pot is empty, usually around 3 or 4 a.m. Their tripe is one of the best in the city (soft yet crispy, oh so savory, never chewy), making Los Cocuyos an obligatory visit for any taco enthusiast. As of late, expect long lines around evening time.

From above, two tacos on corn tortillas topped with tripas, onions, and salsa, on a plate held above the ground.
Tripa tacos at Los Cocuyos.
Natalia de la Rosa

Taquería Gabriel

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Located in the financial district, taquería Gabriel specializes in tacos al carbon (charcoal-grilled tacos) and volcanes (served on a fried tortilla turned up at the edges) with grilled proteins like beef, adobada, suckling pig, and shrimp. The volcanes are especially great: charred, almost ashy tortillas, not quite as crunchy as a tostada, topped with a small mountain of meat and cheese melted over the top. One of a new wave of taquerías, Gabriel offers more flexibility than some other spots, allowing you to customize your taco with your choice of flour or corn tortilla or volcan, and the option to skip cheese.

Con Vista Al Mar

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Even though Mexico City is miles away from the sea, it doesn’t fall short on seafood. Con Vista al Mar celebrates Mexico’s coastline cuisine, reinterpreting famous regional seafood tacos from Sinaloa, Sonora, Guerrero, and Baja California, and combining them with inland influences. For example, the Acapulco taco takes the renown fish a la talla (grilled fish coated with a chile-mayo adobo) from the fishing villages of Guerrero and places it in a tortilla with fried beans and red cabbage slaw. Or try the Zicatela, which honors Oaxacan flavors with a deep-fried taco served with black chichilo (Oaxacan mole) on the side as a dip. When in doubt, order one of the most sought-after tacos, the Chilango: A tribute to CDMX’s famous campechano taco consisting of perfectly seasoned, house-made shrimp chorizo with chicharron and spicy tomato sauce. Con Vista al Mar regularly hosts one-on-one taco battles between local chefs and it has become the “it” spot for the industry community.

Tizne Tacomotora

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Tizne was one of the early adopters of the taco as a multicultural vessel, reframing the dish through an international lens and inspiring a new wave of innovative taco shops. The offerings cover different culinary traditions, with ingredients and flavor profiles from China, Lebanon, Japan, and the United States. Despite the broad range, the entire menu is anchored in distinctively smoky character, nixtamalized blue-corn tortillas, and chile-packed salsas. The taquería is located in a small space in Roma, filled with tables to sit down and eat, though service remains rightly casual.

From above, a dark tortilla on a plate. The taco includes slices of jalapeno, radish, and fish in a dark sauce.
One of the fusion tacos at Tizne Tacomotora.
Tizne Tacomotora

Cariñito Tacos

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Mexican and Asian flavors meet in corn tortillas at Cariñito Tacos in Colonia Roma. Locals tend to label this place a hipster taquería, due to their smaller portions, toppings like microgreens, and interesting selection of wines. But don’t underestimate the taqueros, who produce deep flavors with combos like pork belly in soy sauce, or pork confit with tamarind and basil sauce, the most popular options on the menu. Somewhere between a street eatery and a micro-restaurant, whatever Cariñito is, it comes with a lot of hype.

The storefront of a small taco operation with an open kitchen. Customers stand in line while a cook in a floral shirt and sunglasses dispenses food.
The line at Cariñito Tacos.
Andrew Reiner/Eater

Tacos Hola El Güero

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For a full meal wrapped in a tortilla, Hola El Güero in Condesa is the right call. The shop is famous for its array of guisados (stews), which taqueros carefully scoop from a regiment of clay cazuelas onto double-stacked tortillas along with generous servings of rice or beans. Look for the steak in pasilla sauce, the chicharron in green salsa, or chile relleno, which comes with green poblano pepper or red ancho pepper. Hola El Güero is especially busy during the lunch hour.

Taquería El Greco

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Tacos árabes are like the older cousins of pastor tacos. Middle Eastern immigrants, likely from Lebanon, first introduced cooking with the vertical spit in Puebla, mingling sympatico meats, flavors, and flatbreads. The version of tacos árabes at El Greco is a relative elder statesman among Mexico City tacos; the taquería dates back to the mid-’70s. Stick to ordering what they do best: the doneraky taco, served in pita. Locals and visitors both frequent this spot in Condesa, randomly bumping into friends or making new acquaintances, all lured by the enduring mysticism of the old-school taquería that has become harder to find in the neighborhood.

Carnitas Paty

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Carnitas Paty has been a popular stop deep inside the Jamaica Market for more than three decades, and judging by the amount of business they do on any given day, they’re still at the top of their game. Any taco devotee will surely order a mixed taco, usually a combination of rib or lean pork meat with cuerito (confit pork skin), pork’s ear, or buche (stomach). Carnitas Paty is also known for their cold, refreshing tepache, a fermented pineapple drink with piloncillo. There’s plenty of seating in the market to enjoy your prizes, though the stools are usually full; just be patient and grab a spot when you see one.

From above, two tacos well covered in cilantro and onions, on a blue plate beside salsas, lime wedges, and other sauces.
Carnitas tacos at Carnitas Paty.
Natalia de la Rosa

Taquería Los Parados

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The greatest meals at Los Parados come off the charcoal grill, where they cook all sorts of meats: arrachera (skirt steak), chorizo, pastor, chicken, pork chops, or some combination seasoned with onions, bacon, or cheese. The taquería is quite popular as an afterparty spot late into the night, and service is quick. Order your tacos, wait for your order by the grill, and take your meal to any available counter. The name of the taquería comes from the custom of eating tacos on your feet, which connoisseurs argue is the best way to indulge in the art of the taco.

Tacos Ruben’s

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The legend of Tacos Ruben’s is well known across Mexico City. A family-run taquería, this tiny street-side taco cart lures customers from all corners of the city for a taste of the famous taco especial, a combination of suadero, longaniza, and tripe. The tacos are generous, served on standard-sized tortillas (not the shrunken tortilla taquera that’s usually seen in taquerías). The service is extra friendly, though you might want to visit early because the tacos run out fast.

El Vilsito

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Tourists don’t tend to explore the quiet Narvarte neighborhood, but El Vilsito is worth the trip alone for a pastor taco that’s a top pick for locals. The taqueros are true masters at shaving the trompo, flinging pineapple slices from the spit, and catching them in mid-air in a display of taco acrobatics. The gringa (two flour tortillas filled with pastor meat and a generous portion of melty cheese) and the bistocino (a perfect combination of grilled steak and bacon topped with onion) are also worthy of praise. Big molcajetes overflowing with salsas and late-night crowds complete the Vilsito experience.

Tacos Tony

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For night owls or early birds with a hankering for tacos at 3 a.m., Tacos Tony is here for you. The sizzling, steaming taco operation has been around for more than 15 years in a busy intersection in the Narvarte neighborhood. Chilangos revere the taquería for the spiciness of their guacamole, roja, and verde salsas, all kissed with habanero. The campechano taco is among the best in town, but other excellent options include their lengua (tongue) and chunky suadero, a thick piece of perfectly cooked brisket on a crisp tortilla.

A taquero hovers over a large comal with sections for various meats and vegetables cooking, and a single tortilla toasting in the center.
Cooking up meats and fixings on the comal.
Natalia de la Rosa

Los 3 Reyes

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For lamb barbacoa fresh from the oven, head to Los Tres Reyes in Mixcoac, an institution with over seven decades of experience that opens every Saturday and Sunday. The taquería is almost a religion, offering salvation in the morning to anyone who indulged a bit too much at happy hour the night before, all set to the tune of live Norteño music playing in the background. The barbacoa is sold by the pound as it comes out of brick ovens, and it should be mandatory to pair these tacos with a cup of the shop’s well-seasoned broth, the richest in Mexico City.

A hand grabs meat in a blue tortilla from a large hunk of roasted barbacoa.
Grabbing a handful of barbacoa.
Andrew Reiner/Eater

Tacos de Canasta Beto

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Canasta tacos are remarkably popular among locals, but the style often goes completely unnoticed by visitors; the tacos are constantly on the move, stacked in baskets covered with cloth and plastic, and transported on the backs of bicycles or in mobile carts. The technique for canasta tacos requires a decent level of expertise. Taqueros fill tortillas with various stews — usually chicharron with green salsa, fried beans, or shredded meat with potato — stack them inside a cloth-covered basket, pour in a hot seasoned oil with chile, and close the basket to let it all steam and soak and season from within. The tacos emerge soggy and rich, but intact enough to eat without dissolving in your hand. Tacos El Beto is relatively easy to find; the long-time player has an official corner in the Coyoacán neighborhood. Try the chicharron taco with the guacamole and habanero salsa.

Los Milanesos

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For more than 20 years, Los Milanesos has severed one of the heartier creations in the taco scene: two tortillas topped with a spoonful of refried beans and thick strips of beef or chicken milanesa (breaded steak) coated with a very spicy guacamole salsa. Los Milanesos really cemented their reputation with the ham and cheese milanesa, a massive, indulgent mess of melty cheese and thick slices of ham, all crispy and crunchy from the deep fryer. Los Milanesos is a street stand located on the sidewalk of a busy avenue; just look for the crowd.

Tacos La Bici

A beacon on the north side of Mexico City, La Bici is a living example of many taqueros’ dream: to work hard and build a taco empire. The taqueros began selling tacos from a bicycle (which gives the taquería its name) but worked their way up to a large, buzzing storefront on a corner lot in Satélite. Costilla and guisado tacos are among the best options, but whatever you order, be sure to check out La Bici’s well-stocked salsa bar, which includes more than a dozen different styles: pico de gallo, guacamole, tomatillo, roja, guajillo, habanero, and more. For locals who judge taquerías by the quality and variety of salsas, the secret to La Bici’s success is obvious.

La Pingüica

Two cooks work around a trompo, charring from the heat of the fire in an open kitchen.
The trompo at la Pingüica.
Natalia de la Rosa

La Pingüica’s pastor taco has been the same since the beginning of time. The tiny taco overflows with morita salsa, the meat is charred from the unruly fire cooking the trompo, and sweet caramelized onions cover it all. The whole taco almost falls apart, requiring you shovel it within seconds. The taquería has remained a beloved spot for more than 40 years, mostly frequented by locals and in-the-know visitors. Don’t be shy when ordering, since each taco is usually gone after two bites.

Two cooks work around a trompo, charring from the heat of the fire in an open kitchen.
The trompo at la Pingüica.
Natalia de la Rosa

Tacos El Paisa

Two tacos covered in salsa on a paper plate, which sits on a comal beside a large chef’s knife and chopped meat.
Suadero and longaniza tacos.
Natalia de la Rosa

Walk around the San Rafael neighborhood, and you might smell El Paisa’s bubbling taco cauldron half a block away. The taquería makes a statement with their suadero en trozo taco: chunky slices of slow-and-low cooked brisket that land in tortillas carefully crisped in oil, all topped with a bright red tomato salsa. Order your taco “con todo” as locals do, and don’t miss the confit onion offered as a courtesy; it’s soft, sweet, salty, and everything good that an onion can be.

Two tacos covered in salsa on a paper plate, which sits on a comal beside a large chef’s knife and chopped meat.
Suadero and longaniza tacos.
Natalia de la Rosa

El Turix

The upscale Polanco neighborhood isn’t generally regarded as a taco destination in Mexico City, but the cochinita taco at El Turix justifies a visit. Juicy, tender, perfectly seasoned pork and a Yucatan-style achiote marinade are the keys to El Turix’s long-lasting popularity. Order a cochinita taco, a torta (if you want to go bigger), or the speciality, a panucho: a deep-fried tortilla stuffed with fried bean paste, topped with cochinita and red onion escabeche.

Los Cocuyos

From above, two tacos on corn tortillas topped with tripas, onions, and salsa, on a plate held above the ground.
Tripa tacos at Los Cocuyos.
Natalia de la Rosa

The most famous downtown taquería, Los Cocuyos keeps up an impressive operation 24/7 as diners gather on the short plastic stools on the curb at all hours. The shop specializes in suadero (brisket) and tripe cooked in a bubbly meat jacuzzi, as well as tacos de cabeza (steamed cow’s head). The Cocuyos technique is very basic; the tacos are cooked in lard confit seasoned just with salt, no herbs, and the master taqueros work patiently as they stir the cauldron, chop ingredients, and serve tacos until the pot is empty, usually around 3 or 4 a.m. Their tripe is one of the best in the city (soft yet crispy, oh so savory, never chewy), making Los Cocuyos an obligatory visit for any taco enthusiast. As of late, expect long lines around evening time.

From above, two tacos on corn tortillas topped with tripas, onions, and salsa, on a plate held above the ground.
Tripa tacos at Los Cocuyos.
Natalia de la Rosa

Taquería Gabriel

Located in the financial district, taquería Gabriel specializes in tacos al carbon (charcoal-grilled tacos) and volcanes (served on a fried tortilla turned up at the edges) with grilled proteins like beef, adobada, suckling pig, and shrimp. The volcanes are especially great: charred, almost ashy tortillas, not quite as crunchy as a tostada, topped with a small mountain of meat and cheese melted over the top. One of a new wave of taquerías, Gabriel offers more flexibility than some other spots, allowing you to customize your taco with your choice of flour or corn tortilla or volcan, and the option to skip cheese.

Con Vista Al Mar

Even though Mexico City is miles away from the sea, it doesn’t fall short on seafood. Con Vista al Mar celebrates Mexico’s coastline cuisine, reinterpreting famous regional seafood tacos from Sinaloa, Sonora, Guerrero, and Baja California, and combining them with inland influences. For example, the Acapulco taco takes the renown fish a la talla (grilled fish coated with a chile-mayo adobo) from the fishing villages of Guerrero and places it in a tortilla with fried beans and red cabbage slaw. Or try the Zicatela, which honors Oaxacan flavors with a deep-fried taco served with black chichilo (Oaxacan mole) on the side as a dip. When in doubt, order one of the most sought-after tacos, the Chilango: A tribute to CDMX’s famous campechano taco consisting of perfectly seasoned, house-made shrimp chorizo with chicharron and spicy tomato sauce. Con Vista al Mar regularly hosts one-on-one taco battles between local chefs and it has become the “it” spot for the industry community.

Tizne Tacomotora

From above, a dark tortilla on a plate. The taco includes slices of jalapeno, radish, and fish in a dark sauce.
One of the fusion tacos at Tizne Tacomotora.
Tizne Tacomotora

Tizne was one of the early adopters of the taco as a multicultural vessel, reframing the dish through an international lens and inspiring a new wave of innovative taco shops. The offerings cover different culinary traditions, with ingredients and flavor profiles from China, Lebanon, Japan, and the United States. Despite the broad range, the entire menu is anchored in distinctively smoky character, nixtamalized blue-corn tortillas, and chile-packed salsas. The taquería is located in a small space in Roma, filled with tables to sit down and eat, though service remains rightly casual.

From above, a dark tortilla on a plate. The taco includes slices of jalapeno, radish, and fish in a dark sauce.
One of the fusion tacos at Tizne Tacomotora.
Tizne Tacomotora

Cariñito Tacos

The storefront of a small taco operation with an open kitchen. Customers stand in line while a cook in a floral shirt and sunglasses dispenses food.
The line at Cariñito Tacos.
Andrew Reiner/Eater

Mexican and Asian flavors meet in corn tortillas at Cariñito Tacos in Colonia Roma. Locals tend to label this place a hipster taquería, due to their smaller portions, toppings like microgreens, and interesting selection of wines. But don’t underestimate the taqueros, who produce deep flavors with combos like pork belly in soy sauce, or pork confit with tamarind and basil sauce, the most popular options on the menu. Somewhere between a street eatery and a micro-restaurant, whatever Cariñito is, it comes with a lot of hype.

The storefront of a small taco operation with an open kitchen. Customers stand in line while a cook in a floral shirt and sunglasses dispenses food.
The line at Cariñito Tacos.
Andrew Reiner/Eater

Tacos Hola El Güero

For a full meal wrapped in a tortilla, Hola El Güero in Condesa is the right call. The shop is famous for its array of guisados (stews), which taqueros carefully scoop from a regiment of clay cazuelas onto double-stacked tortillas along with generous servings of rice or beans. Look for the steak in pasilla sauce, the chicharron in green salsa, or chile relleno, which comes with green poblano pepper or red ancho pepper. Hola El Güero is especially busy during the lunch hour.

Taquería El Greco

Tacos árabes are like the older cousins of pastor tacos. Middle Eastern immigrants, likely from Lebanon, first introduced cooking with the vertical spit in Puebla, mingling sympatico meats, flavors, and flatbreads. The version of tacos árabes at El Greco is a relative elder statesman among Mexico City tacos; the taquería dates back to the mid-’70s. Stick to ordering what they do best: the doneraky taco, served in pita. Locals and visitors both frequent this spot in Condesa, randomly bumping into friends or making new acquaintances, all lured by the enduring mysticism of the old-school taquería that has become harder to find in the neighborhood.

Carnitas Paty

From above, two tacos well covered in cilantro and onions, on a blue plate beside salsas, lime wedges, and other sauces.
Carnitas tacos at Carnitas Paty.
Natalia de la Rosa

Carnitas Paty has been a popular stop deep inside the Jamaica Market for more than three decades, and judging by the amount of business they do on any given day, they’re still at the top of their game. Any taco devotee will surely order a mixed taco, usually a combination of rib or lean pork meat with cuerito (confit pork skin), pork’s ear, or buche (stomach). Carnitas Paty is also known for their cold, refreshing tepache, a fermented pineapple drink with piloncillo. There’s plenty of seating in the market to enjoy your prizes, though the stools are usually full; just be patient and grab a spot when you see one.

From above, two tacos well covered in cilantro and onions, on a blue plate beside salsas, lime wedges, and other sauces.
Carnitas tacos at Carnitas Paty.
Natalia de la Rosa

Taquería Los Parados

The greatest meals at Los Parados come off the charcoal grill, where they cook all sorts of meats: arrachera (skirt steak), chorizo, pastor, chicken, pork chops, or some combination seasoned with onions, bacon, or cheese. The taquería is quite popular as an afterparty spot late into the night, and service is quick. Order your tacos, wait for your order by the grill, and take your meal to any available counter. The name of the taquería comes from the custom of eating tacos on your feet, which connoisseurs argue is the best way to indulge in the art of the taco.

Tacos Ruben’s

The legend of Tacos Ruben’s is well known across Mexico City. A family-run taquería, this tiny street-side taco cart lures customers from all corners of the city for a taste of the famous taco especial, a combination of suadero, longaniza, and tripe. The tacos are generous, served on standard-sized tortillas (not the shrunken tortilla taquera that’s usually seen in taquerías). The service is extra friendly, though you might want to visit early because the tacos run out fast.

El Vilsito

Tourists don’t tend to explore the quiet Narvarte neighborhood, but El Vilsito is worth the trip alone for a pastor taco that’s a top pick for locals. The taqueros are true masters at shaving the trompo, flinging pineapple slices from the spit, and catching them in mid-air in a display of taco acrobatics. The gringa (two flour tortillas filled with pastor meat and a generous portion of melty cheese) and the bistocino (a perfect combination of grilled steak and bacon topped with onion) are also worthy of praise. Big molcajetes overflowing with salsas and late-night crowds complete the Vilsito experience.

Related Maps

Tacos Tony

A taquero hovers over a large comal with sections for various meats and vegetables cooking, and a single tortilla toasting in the center.
Cooking up meats and fixings on the comal.
Natalia de la Rosa

For night owls or early birds with a hankering for tacos at 3 a.m., Tacos Tony is here for you. The sizzling, steaming taco operation has been around for more than 15 years in a busy intersection in the Narvarte neighborhood. Chilangos revere the taquería for the spiciness of their guacamole, roja, and verde salsas, all kissed with habanero. The campechano taco is among the best in town, but other excellent options include their lengua (tongue) and chunky suadero, a thick piece of perfectly cooked brisket on a crisp tortilla.

A taquero hovers over a large comal with sections for various meats and vegetables cooking, and a single tortilla toasting in the center.
Cooking up meats and fixings on the comal.
Natalia de la Rosa

Los 3 Reyes

A hand grabs meat in a blue tortilla from a large hunk of roasted barbacoa.
Grabbing a handful of barbacoa.
Andrew Reiner/Eater

For lamb barbacoa fresh from the oven, head to Los Tres Reyes in Mixcoac, an institution with over seven decades of experience that opens every Saturday and Sunday. The taquería is almost a religion, offering salvation in the morning to anyone who indulged a bit too much at happy hour the night before, all set to the tune of live Norteño music playing in the background. The barbacoa is sold by the pound as it comes out of brick ovens, and it should be mandatory to pair these tacos with a cup of the shop’s well-seasoned broth, the richest in Mexico City.

A hand grabs meat in a blue tortilla from a large hunk of roasted barbacoa.
Grabbing a handful of barbacoa.
Andrew Reiner/Eater

Tacos de Canasta Beto

Canasta tacos are remarkably popular among locals, but the style often goes completely unnoticed by visitors; the tacos are constantly on the move, stacked in baskets covered with cloth and plastic, and transported on the backs of bicycles or in mobile carts. The technique for canasta tacos requires a decent level of expertise. Taqueros fill tortillas with various stews — usually chicharron with green salsa, fried beans, or shredded meat with potato — stack them inside a cloth-covered basket, pour in a hot seasoned oil with chile, and close the basket to let it all steam and soak and season from within. The tacos emerge soggy and rich, but intact enough to eat without dissolving in your hand. Tacos El Beto is relatively easy to find; the long-time player has an official corner in the Coyoacán neighborhood. Try the chicharron taco with the guacamole and habanero salsa.

Los Milanesos

For more than 20 years, Los Milanesos has severed one of the heartier creations in the taco scene: two tortillas topped with a spoonful of refried beans and thick strips of beef or chicken milanesa (breaded steak) coated with a very spicy guacamole salsa. Los Milanesos really cemented their reputation with the ham and cheese milanesa, a massive, indulgent mess of melty cheese and thick slices of ham, all crispy and crunchy from the deep fryer. Los Milanesos is a street stand located on the sidewalk of a busy avenue; just look for the crowd.

Related Maps