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Diners sit at outdoor tables beneath awnings on a sunny afternoon.
Dining outside Casalino.
Casalino Osteria Kosher

The 38 Essential Rome Restaurants

Pizza topped with suckling pig and prickly pear at a third-wave pizzeria, couscous with crab at a Sardinian wine bar, and more great things to eat in Rome

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Dining outside Casalino.
| Casalino Osteria Kosher

Roman cuisine is defined by a unique set of ingredients, techniques, and dishes that set it apart from the food of all other Italian cities. Generational trattorias serve a delicious (if predictable) litany of specialties such as cacio e pepe, carbonara, roasted lamb, and assorted offal. Their ranks are bolstered by a number of neo-trattorias that take a fresh approach to the classics — just one way young chefs are nudging tradition forward in the Italian capital. There are also plenty of international flavors offering a break from the pecorino Romano- and guanciale-laden Roman classics.

Travelers tend to plan their dining itineraries far in advance, meaning last minute reservations are difficult. Consider booking a month ahead for sought-after spots. While some do offer online booking, you’ll have to try your luck by phone elsewhere, including at places so understaffed they aren’t even able to answer the phone some days; calling at the very beginning or end of service is your best bet.

Update, September 2022:

Rome is emerging from an extremely hot and crowded summer, and fall promises little relief from the crowds. Staffing challenges of late mean service can be chaotic or idiosyncratic, so it pays to turn up with a healthy dose of empathy and patience.

The contemporary dining scene is most interesting (and affordable) at places like Marzapane and Dogma, where chefs trained in fine dining have settled into their own styles. Some of the best bites in town continue to be fast food, like the sheet pan pizza at Pizzarium and the sourdough pizza pockets at Trapizzino. The seated pizzeria category is also absolutely booming — a silver lining of the pandemic — as the expansion of I Quintili and 180g Pizzeria Romana attest. Meanwhile, diners in search of lighter meals or vino from small producers will enjoy wine bars like L’Antidoto, Beppe e I Suoi Formaggi, and the Sardinia-focused new entry Latteria Trastevere.

Katie Parla is a Rome-based food and beverage journalist, culinary guide, and New York Times best-selling cookbook author. She is the host of Katie Parla’s Rome and Katie Parla’s Roman Kitchen on Recipe.TV, and the co-host of the GOLA podcast and GOLA on the Road television show about Italian food and drinks culture.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Marzapane

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Originally founded in 2013 near Piazza Fiume, Marzapane relocated just north of Piazza del Popolo to a townhouse on the Via Flaminia in early 2021. The ground-floor kitchen is helmed by chef Tommaso Tonioni who puts his training from Etxebarri and other flame-focused kitchens to good use. The chef’s table menu features an ever-changing selection of dishes that are grilled, smoked, cooked under ash, or prepared in clay vessels. There are three- and five-course tasting menus, as well as a la carte options like rabbit with salt cod and black garlic, pasta with red chickpea miso and rockfish, and heritage pork sausage with caponata.

A plate of pasta topped with fixings on a textured tablecloth on an outdoor wooden table
Fresh pasta with fried zucchini and Provolone del Monaco
Katie Parla

La Tradizione

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Whether you’re shopping for pantry provisions for your Airbnb or hunting for mature cheeses, aged vinegars, and extra-virgin olive oil to take home, La Tradizione has got you covered. The selection of cheeses, up to 400 depending on the season, is unrivaled in Rome, and few gastronomie offer such a prestigious assortment of cured meats. In spite of being one of the city’s premier gourmet food purveyors, the prices are reasonable, owing to its location in the working- and middle-class Trionfale district. Owners Stefano Lobina and Francesco Praticò are devoted to serving their local clientele.

Sausages and other meats in a deli case with labels
The meat case in all its glory
La Tradizione [Facebook]

Pizzarium

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Gabriele Bonci’s landmark pizza al taglio (pizza by the slice) shop near the Vatican Museums has become a globally acclaimed landmark where cold-fermented, heirloom wheat-based dough is topped with exquisite produce from biodynamic farms and artisanal cured meats and cheeses. Most toppings change from day to day, or even hour to hour, but Pizzarium’s signatures (tomato-oregano and potato-mozzarella) are always available. There are only a few high-top tables outside and no seating, so don’t wear yourself out too much wandering the museums before stopping by.

Size squared off pieces of pizza with various toppings on wax paper on a tray
Slices of sausage and arugula; artichoke; and potato with prosciutto and chicory
Katie Parla

Romanè

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Rome’s premier pizza innovator and Trapizzino inventor Stefano Callegari opened his first trattoria in late 2021 just north of the Vatican Museums. The menu is a blend of decadent Roman classics like polpette di bollito (fried meatballs made from pulled braised beef) and fun twists on tradition— the fettuccine al tortellino features handmade pasta strands drenched in a creamy sauce enriched with prosciutto, mortadella, and Parmigiano-Reggiano, evoking the rich filling of tortellini. Romanè is part of the Piatto del Buon Ricordo Association, which has recognized traditional Italian regional cuisine since 1964. If you opt for the trattoria’s specialties as indicated on the menu, you’ll get a hand-painted plate as a souvenir.

Three brown breaded fried meatballs on a texture plate.
Polpette di bollito
Katie Parla

Colline Emiliane

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A short walk from the Trevi Fountain, this friendly trattoria has been serving satisfying dishes from Emilia-Romagna, a region in northeastern Italy, since 1931; the current owners took the helm in 1967. The menu is rich in egg-based house-made pastas like tortelli di zucca (pumpkin pasta with butter and sage) and tagliatelle alla bolognese (long strands of fresh, egg-based pasta dressed with a rich meat sauce). Save room for meaty mains including bollito misto (assorted simmered meats) and fried liver. Book well in advance and try for a Sunday, when Colline Emiliane serves delicate, bechamel-laced lasagna.

A server hands over a bowl of tortellini in broth on a saucer
Tortellini in broth
Colline Emiliane [Facebook]

Armando al Pantheon

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Just 100 feet from Rome’s most intact ancient monument, Armando al Pantheon champions local food traditions. For more than five decades, the Gargioli family has been dutifully producing Roman classics like spaghetti ajo ojo e peperoncino (spaghetti with garlic, oil, and chile) and coda alla vaccinara (oxtail braised in tomato and celery). Among the seasonal side dishes, look for puntarelle (Catalonian chicory) with anchovy sauce and carciofi alla romana (simmered artichokes) in the cooler months. Save room for the torta antica Roma, a ricotta and strawberry jam pie. The lovingly curated wine list gets better every year. Online booking is essential and opens (and books up) one month ahead.

Four diners eat pasta and drink wine at a white table cloth-covered table
Four-top at Armando al Pantheon
Armando al Pantheon [official]

Supplizio

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Chef Arcangelo Dandini, known for his formal ristorante L’Arcangelo in Prati, opened this casual street food-inspired spot on the ground floor of a Renaissance building in central Rome in order to bring his fried specialties and signature finger foods to the masses. The name is inspired by suppli, Roman rice balls, which are served in assorted flavors alongside other fried classics, including crocchette di patate (potato croquettes), polpette di alici (anchovy “meatballs”), and, the most decadent of all, crema fritta (pastry cream).

Forno Campo de' Fiori

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In the southwest corner of one of Rome’s most touristy squares, Forno Campo de’ Fiori bakes sweet and savory Roman specialties like jam tarts and flatbreads. Look for pizza alla pala (long slabs baked directly in a deep electric deck oven), which is sold in slices by weight; the unctuous toppings and crispy bases make a surprisingly balanced pair. The pizza con mortadella, perfectly salty slices of pizza bianca sandwiching thin slices of mortadella, is one of the best bites in town.

Drink Kong

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Veteran mixologist Patrick Pistolesi opened craft cocktail bar Drink Kong in the shadow of a towering medieval fortress at the cusp of the Monti and Esquilino districts. The bar, however, is anything but dated: Neon accents, tropical plants, and Blade Runner vibes anchor the slick black interior. Rather than individual drinks, the conceptual menu prompts guests to select from a litany of flavors and emotions, which the bartenders then use to mix the ideal cocktail. All this might sound incredibly precious, but Drink Kong is just a fun place to drink well with help from some of Italy’s top talent.

A bar interior, with a brightly lit bar, tables and lounge area, cement floor, bright strip lighting on the ceiling, and neon sign reading “drink kong” on the far wall
Inside Drink Kong
Drink Kong [official]

Pasticceria Regoli

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The Regoli family were originally charcoal makers from Tuscany, but when they came to Rome they opened Pasticceria Regoli in 1916. Since then the family has transformed their small operation into one of the city’s most beloved pastry shops. The display cases are packed with cakes, wild strawberry tarts, maritozzi (whipped cream-filled buns), and seasonal treats like bigne in March, colombe at Easter, and pandoro at Christmas. Get your pastries packaged to take away, or order at the counter and the kitchen will send the items to your table at the neighboring Caffé Regoli, which also serves coffee.

Rows of brightly covered pastries
Pasticcini (bite-sized pastries)
Pasticceria Regoli [official]

Enqutatash

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Fasika and Giovanni Ghirlanda run this historic Ethiopian and Eritrean restaurant just off the ancient Via Prenestina, not far from the Villa Gordiani public park. Deeply flavored simmered vegetables and legumes, along with perfectly seasoned chicken and beef stews, are served on house-made injera.

A variety of stews on injera, with more flatbread rolled up to the side
Kitfo, doro wot, atkilt wot, kik alicha, and gomen
Katie Parla

Salumeria Roscioli

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Founded in the Historic Center in 2004 by Rome’s premier baking family, Salumeria Roscioli does triple duty as a deli, wine bar, and restaurant. Though the menu is extensive, the real stars are the cheeses (burrata with semi-dried tomatoes is spectacular), cured meats (Culaccia and mortadella with Parmigiano-Reggiano are both stellar), and pasta classics (get the gricia, cacio e pepe, amatriciana, or carbonara). If you dine at lunch or on the early side at dinner, the bread basket will include warm bread from nearby Antico Forno Roscioli. The wine list is wide-ranging, and don’t miss the distilled spirits before closing out the meal. Be sure to book online well in advance and reserve a ground-floor, bar counter, or outdoor table so you don’t get stuck in the basement.

A plate of pasta on a white plate.

Beppe e I Suoi Formaggi

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After more than a decade of selling Italian and French cheeses and wine at the edge of the historic Ghetto of Rome, Beppe e I Suoi Formaggi renovated and considerably downsized its space and menu. Now the single dining room is mostly occupied by the incredible array of cheeses made by, among others, owner Beppe Giovale. The menu is predictably dairy focused with cheese plates, as well as butter and ricotta, which are paired with salted anchovies and honey, respectively, alongside natural vino. The wine list features collaborations with wine makers like Sicily’s Nino Barraco. Beppe e I Suoi Formaggi also expanded to a stall in the Mercato Trionfale in late 2021. 

Various kinds of cheeses stacked on layers of wood shelves.
The eponymous cheeses.
Beppe e I Suoi Formaggi

Casalino Osteria Kosher

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The dishes at Casalino, a kosher restaurant on the main street in Rome’s Jewish quarter, are inspired by traditions of the historic ghetto, which tend toward fried vegetables like carciofi alla giudia (deep-fried artichokes) and verdure in pastella (assorted battered vegetables), as well as humble fish offerings like tortino di alici (baked anchovies). Along with centuries-old Roman Jewish classics, Casalino also serves more modern dishes like carbonara with tuna instead of guanciale and cacio e pepe with crispy squash blossoms.

From above, diners enjoy two plates of pasta.
Pastas at Casalino.
Casalino Osteria Kosher

Boccione – l Forno del Ghetto

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For more than three centuries, Rome’s Jewish community was confined to a walled ghetto along the Tiber River. The squalid buildings are long gone, but a historic ghetto-era bakery survives on what has become the transformed neighborhood’s main thoroughfare. The pizza ebraica — an almond flour-based fruit cake studded with nuts, raisins, and candied fruits — is an easy specialty to eat on the go, but it’s worth seeking out a bench to get messy with a slice of the spectacular ricotta and sour-cherry tart. Also try the amaretti and biscotti made with heaps of cinnamon and a generous smattering of whole almonds.

Cakes in a pastry case
Kosher cakes and breads
Eleonora Baldwin

Ma Che Siete Venuti A Fà

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Routinely named among the best places to drink in Europe, this long-established craft beer pub in Trastevere pours around a dozen draft beers from Italy, the U.S., Belgium, Germany, and the U.K., in addition to a small but well-curated assortment of bottles. The staff is passionate and knowledgeable, and can guide you to the right choice for your palate. It’s worth waiting for the few tables on the street outside, set up during the pandemic, which offer a front row seat to Trastevere’s lively nightlife. Ma Che Siete Venuti a Fà is open every day of the year — even on Christmas, Easter, Ferragosto, and New Year’s.

A branded pint glass full of beer on a bar
A draft of Alderbeer Green Lobster
Ma Che Siete Venuti A Fà [Facebook]

Trapizzino

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Trapizzino is a small street food chain with locations throughout Italy (and an outpost in New York). The concept is based on the trapizzino, a combination of the popular triangular tramezzino sandwich with long, slowly leavened pizza dough, invented by pizzaiolo Stefano Callegari in 2009. Callegari fills his tricornered creations with Roman classics like oxtail simmered with tomato and celery, chicken cacciatore, and tripe cooked with tomato, each going for just 5 euros or less. Most locations provide a quick, affordable meal, but the branch in Trastevere also offers table service and a full bar highlighting wines and beers from across Lazio.

Three trapizzini with various fillings in a metal rack
Stracciatella and salted anchovy, tongue with salsa verde, and chicken cacciatore trapizzini
Katie Parla

Enoteca L’Antidoto

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Natural wine bar L’Antidoto opened its wrought iron doors in the heart of Trastevere in November 2020, a bold move in precarious times. During the worst of the pandemic, it stayed afloat by selling wines from Italy, Spain, Georgia, France, and Slovenia off the shelves — you can still walk in and snag a bottle without sticking around. But visitors can now enjoy wine and small plates at the three high-top tables and counter seating inside. Due to Rome’s idiosyncratic licensing rules, L’Antidoto’s staff can’t physically serve you, so you’ll have to open bottles yourself and fetch dishes like porcini mushroom salad and figs with burrata from the kitchen’s window. But what the bar lacks in table service, it makes up for with enthusiastic guidance from the staff.

A plate of sliced mushroom salad on a wooden table with a menu beneath the plate
Porcini mushroom salad
Katie Parla

Latteria Trastevere

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Latteria Trastevere is a wine bar and bistro in Rome’s nightlife epicenter focused on natural vino, cheeses, and cured meats culled from tiny, sought-after producers across Italy. There are some hot dishes too, and Sardinian owner Antonio Cossu brings in island specialties like sa fregola (pearl couscous) with crab and bottles from Barbagia, one of Sardinia’s most delicious wine regions. As a bonus, Latteria is open nearly every day of the year.

Diners enjoy an evening meal at outdoor tables beneath umbrellas lit with string lights along the side of a restaurant facade.
Outside Latteria Trastevere.
Latteria Trastevere

Tempio Di Iside

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A short walk from the Colosseum, Tempio di Iside is an elegant fish restaurant known for its crudi (raw dishes) like fish carpaccio, sea urchin roe, langoustines, and oysters. The pasta with sweet red shrimp, cherry tomatoes, and fresh pecorino is excellent (and proof there are valid exceptions to the “no cheese with seafood” rule), as are the spaghetti with clams, whole roasted fish, and pasta with spiny lobster. Book ahead, especially to secure an outdoor table for dinner in the summer, and expect to pay a premium for access to some of the freshest fish around.

Spaghetti with clams in a shallow plate with a diner sitting behind
Spaghetti alle vongole
Katie Parla

Marco Radicioni trained with Rome’s gelato maestro Claudio Torcè, embracing his sensibility of all-natural flavors, meticulous sourcing, and restrained sweetness. Since striking out on his own, Radicioni has grown into a maestro in his own right, churning some of the most exquisite gelato in Italy. Otaleg’s rich and creamy gelato is made from high-quality ingredients like Valrhona and Amedei chocolate, and IGP Tonda Gentile Romana hazelnuts. The fruit, chocolate, and nut sorbets are intense and delicious.

A plastic dish filled with bright yellow gelato with a cone sticking out to one side, and a chocolate square branded with “Otaleg” to the other
Two scoops of zabaione
Otaleg [official]

Zia Restaurant

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Chef Antonio Ziantoni trained at Rome’s ultra-contemporary, two-Michelin-starred restaurant Il Pagliaccio, as well as restaurants in France and the U.K., before opening Zia with his partner Ida Proietti in Trastevere in 2018. Zia’s service and cuisine were recognized with a Michelin star the following year. The a la carte menu (which has a three-dish minimum) features items like spaghetti with sweet peppers and chervil, and sea bass with potatoes and herb pesto. There are tasting menus of six or eight courses as well, and the fine dining service has a formal, ceremonial feel to it.

A small cake with a tightly wound coil of frangipane on top
Vanilla tourbillon with frangipane and almond flour crust
Katie Parla

Santo Palato

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Chef Sarah Cicolini started in fine dining kitchens, but her forte is expertly executed trattoria fare that channels the soulful simplicity of Rome’s peasant classics — a refreshing change in a city where young chefs frequently try and fail to modernize the local cuisine. Diners visit Cicolini’s small dining room in the residential Appio-Latino quarter for carbonara, amatriciana, and a wide range of quinto quarto (offal) dishes, like delicate trippa alla romana (tripe cooked with tomato and seasoned with pecorino Romano and mint). Don’t overdo it with the savory dishes so you can fully enjoy desserts like the maritozzo (cream-filled bun) made with smoky grano arso flour.

A stack of rigatoni with sauce and meat on a white plate
Rigatoni con la pajata
Cultivar Agency

Casa Manfredi

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Casa Manfredi opened in 2015 on a shady stretch of Viale Aventino, a tree-lined residential avenue between Circo Massimo and Testaccio. Like many cafes in Rome, it offers coffee and pastries to customers standing at the counter and seated at some outside tables. But what sets it apart is its exceptional coffee program and the absolutely exquisite pastries made by Giorgia Proia, who laminates croissants (both sweet and savory) and fills maritozzi (Rome’s classic leavened breakfast brioche) with clouds of ethereal whipped cream. In the summer months, Casa Manfredi makes gelato; ask for a few scoops stuffed into a maritozzo for the ultimate warm weather treat.

Two halves of a cream-stuffed croissant, with a bit of red jelly in the center and a full raspberry on top for garnish.
Raspberry-stuffed croissant.
CoffeeAndLucas/myMediaStudio

Piatto Romano

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Located in Testaccio, Rome’s undisputed offal capital, Piatto Romano focuses on classics like rigatoni con la pajata (pasta with milk-fed veal intestines cooked in tomato sauce) and fettuccine con le rigaglie di pollo (fettuccine with chicken innards). There are plenty of pescatarian options as well, like the outstanding cod baked with onions, pine nuts, apricots, and prunes, and pan-fried anchovies spiked with vinegar and chile pepper. To top it off, the vegetable dishes are incredible, especially the foraged greens salad with anchovy dressing and sumac, and the marinated, grilled squashes.

A large fried artichoke on a plate, on the corner of a table
Carciofo alla giudia (fried artichoke)
Katie Parla

180g Pizzeria Romana

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180g Pizzeria Romana opened a second location near Villa Gordiani in August 2021, while the original in Centocelle transitioned to takeaway and delivery. As the name suggests, this “third-wave” pizzeria uses 180 grams of long-fermented dough for each pizza, which is stretched by hand into a disk and garnished with toppings both classic (margherita) and creative (mozzarella, suckling pig, prickly pear, mirto liqueur, Sardinian pecorino, and mint) to yield a characteristically crispy, chewy pizza romana. The new menu also features classic fritti, as well as sampietrini, croquettes shaped like and named for the city’s cobblestones.

A full pizza with huge hunks of cheese, tomatoes, prosciutto, and basil
Roasted tomato, stracciatella, and prosciutto pizza
Katie Parla

Mercato Testaccio

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The Testaccio neighborhood market is the best place in central Rome to shop for seasonal produce, meat, fish, and baked goods all in one place. Get there in the morning to see it in full swing (it’s open Monday through Saturday until 2 p.m.). Visit Da Artenio (Box 90) for takeaway pizza slices and pizzette, little pizzas topped with tomato sauce, potatoes, or onions. Don’t miss the essential Mordi e Vai (Box 15), where the Esposito family prepares sandwiches filled with offal and meat based on generations-old recipes, including disappearing historic dishes like alesso di scottona (simmered brisket). Nearby Da Corrado (Box 18) sells natural wines, artisan cheeses, and a handful of hot dishes — including some of the best polpette (meatballs) in town — while Casa Manco (Box 22) serves naturally leavened pizza by the slice by weight.

A stack of purple artichokes at a farmer’s market
Roman artichokes for sale
Katie Parla

Cesare al Casaletto

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Following careers in fine dining in Italy and abroad, Leonardo Vignoli and Maria Pia Cicconi went back to basics with Cesare al Casaletto, a straightforward trattoria the husband-and-wife duo took over in 2009. The menu features Roman classics with a few restrained twists, like fried gnocchi served on a pool of cacio e pepe sauce. The pasta alla gricia has achieved cult status, the suckling lamb mains are exceptional, and the beverage list spotlights stunningly affordable natural wines from Italy, France, and Slovenia. Cesare isn’t particularly close to any monuments but is easily accessible by public transit — though don’t rule out a post-lunch stroll through the nearby Villa Pamphili, a vast public park.

Fried calamari spilling from a paper cone onto a plate
Totani fritti
Cesare al Casaletto [official]

Himalaya Palace

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In 1993, the Gupta family opened Himalaya Palace, one of the first restaurants to introduce tandoor cooking to Italy. Their longevity in the Gianicolense district has proven customer demand for North Indian cooking in the typically seasoning-averse Italian capital. Their loyal clientele come for succulent chicken makhani, smoky baingan bharta, and tangy paneer tikka.

A table set with a decorative table cloth. On top are a large stew pot of chicken vindaloo, a bowl of white rice, and a dish of tandoori chicken
Tandoori chicken and chicken vindaloo
Katie Parla

Osteria Bonelli

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Former produce vendor Patrizio Bonelli opened his eponymous osteria a decade ago in Tor Pignattara, a diverse, working-class district in eastern Rome. The place is a casual affair known for abundant pasta portions and meaty mains like roasted lamb and horse skirt steak. Owing to Bonelli’s previous profession, the osteria offers a wide range of contorni (vegetable side dishes).

A dining room with small tables, a back room beyond a brick-lined entry
Inside Osteria Bonelli
Katie Parla

Dogma Ristorante

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On paper, Dogma’s house-milled flour, farm-to-table sensibility, and self-described ethical approach to sourcing could play like a trinity of cliches. But the work of young co-founders Alessandra Serramondi and Gabriele Di Lecce feels entirely earnest. After more than a decade in fine dining focusing on seafood, chef Di Lecce has crafted a style that balances attention to detail with accessibility. Dishes like skate-filled bottoni with cultured butter and oregano, or turbot with zucchini and foyot sauce pair brilliantly with minerality-driven white wines. The 40-euro five-course tasting menu is an absolute steal.

A sugar-dusted, caramel-drizzled Paris-brest stuffed with curls of brown cream.
Paris-brest with hazelnuts.
Dogma Ristorante

Sbanco is the most central pizzeria of Rome’s foremost pizza entrepreneur, Stefano Callegari, who teams up with Italian craft brewery Birrificio del Ducato to serve thick-rimmed pizzas baked in a domed, wood-burning Valoriani oven alongside draft beers. Toppings range from classic margherita and marinara to creative cacio e pepe. There’s even a stack of seven margherita pizzas known as lasagna di pizza. Sbanco also serves lots of crispy fritti (fried starters) including suppli carbonara (rice croquettes flavored with the classic carbonara ingredients) and fiori di zucca (battered and fried squash blossoms stuffed with mozzarella and anchovy).

A close-up on the crust and toppings of a margherita pizza
Margherita pizza
Sbanco [Facebook]

Pizzeria I Quintili Furio Camillo

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Pizza maestro Marco Quintili opened his second location in Rome in July 2020, where he marries thick-rimmed Neapolitan pies with Roman flavors. Classic Neapolitan starters like frittatine (pasta croquettes) are flavored with cacio e pepe or amatriciana sauce, while the carbonara pizza channels Rome’s most famous sauce as a topping. Quintili’s dough is ethereal, highly digestible, and the product of years of thoughtful trial and error. The hydration of the dough, temperature of the oven, and bake time are all perfectly calibrated to create a pizza that is stable, not soupy like so many Neapolitan pies.

A croquette bursting with cheese and topped with pepper flakes and a leaf of basil
Crocchette di patate with stracciatella and ‘nduja
Katie Parla

C'è Pasta… e Pasta

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Located a short distance from Stazione Trastevere, C’è Pasta… e Pasta (translation: “There’s pasta… and pasta”) serves delicious kosher meals to eat in or take away. Order at the counter and don’t miss Roman Jewish classics like carciofi alla giudia (fried artichokes), filetti di baccala (battered fried cod), aliciotti con l’indivia (layered anchovy and frisee casserole), and concia (fried and marinated zucchini). As the name promises, they also serve pasta dishes and sell fresh pasta to cook at home.

Fried artichoke hearts on a paper towel-lined tray
Carciofi alla giudia (fried artichokes)
C’è Pasta… e Pasta [Facebook]

Tavernaccia Da Bruno

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Bruno Persiani, an Umbrian transplant to the Italian capital, opened this homey trattoria in southern Trastevere in 1968 to serve a mix of dishes from Umbria and Rome. Tavernaccia is now run by Persiani’s daughters and Sardinian son-in-law, who throws in a few of his own regional specialties like suckling pig cooked in the wood-fired oven. The fresh pastas are excellent (especially Sunday’s lasagna, which sells out fast), and the wood oven-roasted brisket is otherworldly. Organic and natural wines from Italy and Slovenia round out the wine list. The service is patient and unbelievably kind — far from the norm in the Italian capital, so don’t get used to it.

A brick-walled dining room with large tables set for dinner
Inside Tavernaccia Da Bruno
Tavernaccia da Bruno [official]

Marigold Roma

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After years of pop-ups in their apartment, baker Sofie Wochner and chef Domenico Cortese have inaugurated Marigold. The operation is part bakery, focused on naturally leavened breads and pastries, and part cafe, focused on hyper-local, foraged, and seasonal ingredients. The dining room’s light-filled, spartan interior is open for morning and midday meals from Wednesday to Sunday. The menu is vegetable-driven, offering a pleasing break from Rome’s seemingly nonstop carbonara train, with dishes like beets with roasted carrots, peaches, and labneh, or lupini bean hummus with herbs, green beans, hazelnuts, and plums.

Artichoke hearts in a creamy sauce topped with crispy onions and sprigs of greens, on a colorful plate in an empty dining room
Stracciatella, torn bread, artichokes
Katie Parla

Sinosteria

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After nearly 30 years at the helm of Rome’s first Thai restaurant, Beijing-born chef Ge Jing Hua opened Sinosteria in 2020 to serve a blend of Chinese regional cuisines like Beijing-style tripe with chile oil and cilantro, and Shandong-inspired squid with peppers, ginger, and bamboo. There are also signature creations like basmati rice with coconut milk, shrimp, capers, and oregano from Pantelleria. The front of house is expertly managed by Ge’s gregarious sommelier son Jun, whose natural wine list and coffee menu are outstanding.

A heart-shaped dish of squid with vegetables in light sauce
squid with peppers, ginger, and bamboo
Katie Parla

Trecca – Cucina di Mercato

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Trecca is, for lack of a better term, a neo-trattoria. It delivers everything a Roman trattoria should: an informal setting, rigorously seasonal comfort food, and an offal-forward menu. But there’s also a natural wine list, an Instagram page, and two young brothers at the helm. Manuel and Nicolò Trecastelli lean into Rome’s powerful flavors and rich ingredients. Their carbonara and amatriciana are as loaded with pepper-spiked guanciale as any in the city, and tomato and vinegar are employed in the meaty mains to offset their unctuousness.

A menu written on a chalkboard on the wall of a dining room, with pendant lights above, a checkered floor, and a two-top set for dinner
The menu at Trecca
Katie Parla

Marzapane

A plate of pasta topped with fixings on a textured tablecloth on an outdoor wooden table
Fresh pasta with fried zucchini and Provolone del Monaco
Katie Parla

Originally founded in 2013 near Piazza Fiume, Marzapane relocated just north of Piazza del Popolo to a townhouse on the Via Flaminia in early 2021. The ground-floor kitchen is helmed by chef Tommaso Tonioni who puts his training from Etxebarri and other flame-focused kitchens to good use. The chef’s table menu features an ever-changing selection of dishes that are grilled, smoked, cooked under ash, or prepared in clay vessels. There are three- and five-course tasting menus, as well as a la carte options like rabbit with salt cod and black garlic, pasta with red chickpea miso and rockfish, and heritage pork sausage with caponata.

A plate of pasta topped with fixings on a textured tablecloth on an outdoor wooden table
Fresh pasta with fried zucchini and Provolone del Monaco
Katie Parla

La Tradizione

Sausages and other meats in a deli case with labels
The meat case in all its glory
La Tradizione [Facebook]

Whether you’re shopping for pantry provisions for your Airbnb or hunting for mature cheeses, aged vinegars, and extra-virgin olive oil to take home, La Tradizione has got you covered. The selection of cheeses, up to 400 depending on the season, is unrivaled in Rome, and few gastronomie offer such a prestigious assortment of cured meats. In spite of being one of the city’s premier gourmet food purveyors, the prices are reasonable, owing to its location in the working- and middle-class Trionfale district. Owners Stefano Lobina and Francesco Praticò are devoted to serving their local clientele.

Sausages and other meats in a deli case with labels
The meat case in all its glory
La Tradizione [Facebook]

Pizzarium

Size squared off pieces of pizza with various toppings on wax paper on a tray
Slices of sausage and arugula; artichoke; and potato with prosciutto and chicory
Katie Parla

Gabriele Bonci’s landmark pizza al taglio (pizza by the slice) shop near the Vatican Museums has become a globally acclaimed landmark where cold-fermented, heirloom wheat-based dough is topped with exquisite produce from biodynamic farms and artisanal cured meats and cheeses. Most toppings change from day to day, or even hour to hour, but Pizzarium’s signatures (tomato-oregano and potato-mozzarella) are always available. There are only a few high-top tables outside and no seating, so don’t wear yourself out too much wandering the museums before stopping by.