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The 18 Essential Saint-Martin Restaurants

Where to find salt cod-stuffed croissants, rhum-spiked foie gras terrine, goat curry, and classic johnnycakes on this Caribbean gem

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The Caribbean archipelago is dotted with islands offering azure waves, sugar-sand beaches, balmy nights — and not much to eat. Some are clogged with touristy resorts; others only offer haute cuisine at stratospheric prices. Visitors to Saint-Martin, however, often discover the opposite problem: It’s impossible to choose where to eat first.

The West Indian island is actually two countries: the north is the French Collectivity of Saint-Martin, while the southern half, called Sint Maarten, is part of the Netherlands. While cruise ship passengers visit the Dutch side for casinos and nightclubs, the French side is packed with locally owned cafes, bistros, and casual beachside restaurants in a flavorful mix of Creole Caribbean and French cuisine. The area’s culinary reputation started back in 1935, when Jeanne Louise Duzant Chance and her husband, who were Black, opened the island’s first restaurant, Ma Chance’s Hide-Out, in an extra room of their home in Grand Case (pronounced kahs). For decades they entertained exclusive groups of American visitors with recipes like codfish fritters, lobster salad, Creole soup, and passionfruit rum punch, and attracted even more international attention with a 1985 cookbook.

Today, Chance’s legacy, and Saint-Martin’s famous Creole cuisine, is carried on by Black-owned institutions like Yvette’s Kitchen in the French Quarter, Villa Royale in Grand Case, and La Petite Auberge des Îles in Marigot. The rest of Saint-Martin’s restaurant scene is joyfully diverse, ranging from French haute cuisine served with exquisite views and bustling beachside brasseries, to roadside pop-ups and casual lolos (seaside restaurants that are the food trucks of Saint-Martin). From half an island full of great dining options, begin at these 18 all-stars.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

Prices per person, excluding alcohol:

$ = Less than $15 USD
$$ = $15 to $35 USD
$$$ = $35 to $70 USD
$$$$ = $70+ USD

Maria C. Hunt, a California-based journalist specializing in cultural stories around wine, food, design, and wellness, has written for Esquire, Wine Enthusiast, Dwell, and Christian Science Monitor. She’s the author of The Bubbly Bar: Champagne + Sparkling Wine Cocktails for Every Occasion (Clarkson Potter, 2009). Follow her @thebubblygirl on Twitter and Instagram.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Hot Spot by Bush Tea SXM

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Bd de France
Marigot 97150, St Martin

Bartender Daryl Brooks’s tamarind martini is reason enough to stop by this Marigot lolo. He uses a mix of locally grown tamarind (“tamarine” in French) and vanilla to make the award-winning drink, along with Midori and maraschino cherries. “It’s more of a refreshing drink, not too strong and not too sweet,” Brooks says. Hot Spot also specializes in burgers, pasta, and grilled meat plates by chef Renoldo Fleming, who deadpans that it’s the best food on the waterfront. Breakfast might include caramelized French toast made from baguettes with bacon and fruit, and on Fridays, the kitchen barbecues everything but the oink. Another occasional delicacy is Fleming’s turtle soup, meaty and studded with tender potatoes. Saint-Martin lore says turtle soup is a natural Viagra, so it’s especially popular with male clientele. Message the lolo on Facebook to ensure the tamarind martini and turtle soup, both limited specials, are available. [$]

A server pours a thick cocktail from a shaker into a martini glass, garnished with a piece of tamarind candy on a skewer and a tropical leaf
Tamarind martini.

2. Sandy’s Creole Cuisine

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Pl. du Marché
Marigot 97150, St Martin

The menu at Sandy’s Creole Cuisine might look like ones you see at other Creole restaurants on the island, but there’s a big difference in the execution and intention. Owner Christine Illidge (Sandy is her father’s name) is doing something fresh: “Modern Creole without all the grease,” as she describes it. But that doesn’t mean she’s abandoning tradition. Sandy’s was crowned the best authentic Creole restaurant in Saint-Martin’s 2021 Festival de la Gastronomie. The red snapper is moist and meaty, served with fresh tomato salsa, sauteed zucchini, and green salad. If you’d prefer shrimp, choose among the barrage of preparations offered in the shrimp mania special; the tender crustaceans are served in spicy tomato sauce, lightly fried, and napped in garlic butter, but the coconut shrimp captures the ideal flavor and texture of a dish known across the Caribbean. [$$]

Various preparations of shrimp on a bed of ice with french fries in a basket in the background
Creole shrimp mania.

3. Rosemary’s Restaurant

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3W97+7JW
Marigot 97150, St Martin

As the proprietor of the oldest lolo in the area, Rosemary Lendor is the unofficial doyenne of the Marigot waterfront, especially after her spot was blessed with a visit by St. Anthony of Bourdain in 2012. Dressed in a bright plaid shirt that matches her tablecloths, she’s equal parts restaurateur and raconteur. Visit her for breakfast, and you’ll be rewarded with ginger-bay leaf bush tea and a heaping plate of salt fish, roasted green bananas, scrambled eggs, and a warm dish of johnnycakes, the fried or baked flatbread that’s a staple of Saint Martin Creole cuisine. [$]

A woman, seated in a restaurant, throws out her arms in a kind expression
Rosemary Lendor.

4. Chez Coco

Copy Link
3W97+6M8
Marigot 97150, St Martin
0590 29 36 69

The child of Mamie Rose, one of the island’s legendary Creole cooks and restaurateurs back in the day, Coco Lake was destined to join the family business. After returning from his military service in France, his mother encouraged him to open his own restaurant, and he’s become a fixture on the Marigot waterfront. Daily specials like goat and chicken curry and stewed oxtail sell out early in the day. He also serves steak, red snapper, tuna, salmon, and mahi-mahi prepared in various ways, but his specialty is conch Creole, a signature that you can’t find elsewhere. The conch strips are tender, with subtle flavors of butter, green bell pepper, and herbs, accompanied by seasoned rice, sweet plantain, potato salad, and green salad. The creamy mango colada is one for the books. [$ - $$]

An open-air restaurant beneath palm frond roof, with a large banner with the name Chez Coco, and diners at tables
Outside Chez Coco.

5. Spicymilo

Copy Link
3W87+QVX
Marigot 97150, St Martin
590 690 88 37 50

Nearly every Saint Martiner will tell you it’s the seasonings that make the island’s cuisine so distinctive. So before heading home, stock up at this little spice stand in Marigot run by Marianne Gregoire-Celestine (who shows off her own spicy personality in a tourism video). She and her husband started with a local version of Jamaican jerk seasoning and have expanded to include fresh nutmeg seed still in the mace, Caribbean curry powder, and magic spice, their No. 1 seller that’s good on everything from meat to pizza to a cup of bush tea. [$]

An open-air shop with bags of spices beneath chalkboard signs
The Spicymilo shop.

6. Lainez Bakery

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The Lainez family has owned this island favorite for more than 30 years. It’s the kind of place where the walls are covered in photos of cycling and tennis teams sponsored by the restaurant. You’ll see people lined up outside during peak hours, stopping in for a cup of bush tea (tisane) which changes daily; orange juice spiked with ginger; or tropical smoothies with mango, soursop, papaya, and pineapple. On the food menu, the turnovers filled with guava paste or banana are signatures, savory croissants come filled with salt cod and tuna, and breakfast sandwiches are on offer with bacon and eggs. [$]

A person cuts into a large galette, accented by a paper crown and accompanied by several spoons
Galette des Rois.
Lainez Bakery/Facebook

7. Guito Coconut/Alguy Coconut Water

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Rue de Colombier
Rambaud 97150, St Martin
590 690 19 57 04

There’s always lots of honking and waving when locals see friends on the road, but the loudest greetings are saved for the corner of Rue de Rambaud and Rue de Colombier, not far from the Jimmy Sheik mural “Little Girl and Butterfly.” That’s where Guy and Aldrina Helligar, friends to the whole neighborhood, serve fresh coconut water on Sunday mornings. Guy chops the tops off red, orange, and green coconuts, and Aldrina serves them with a straw. You sip, you chat, and once the juice is gone, Guy slices the coconut open so you can eat the jelly. The couple will also add a splash of gin to your juice for a hydrating hair-of-the-dog drink they call morning coffee. Coconuts are 4 euros, spiked coconuts are 5, liters of fresh coconut water are 10, and coconut jelly is 2. [$]

A couple stand outside holding a cut-open coconut
Aldrina and Guy Helligar.

8. Loterie Farm

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Rue du Pic Paradis
St Martin 97150, St Martin

Loterie Farm is a sexy eco-resort where energetic visitors can hop on ziplines or hike in the tropical hills — but most people flaunt their beach bodies by the Jungle Pool. The kidney-shaped water is refreshed by waterfalls, and ringed by mango trees, variegated vines, chaise longues, and cabanas. The extensive drink menu includes rum punch, passionfruit daiquiris, pina coladas, mojitos, margaritas, and fruity zero-proof creations. The resort’s restaurant also makes everything from salads and burgers to platters filled with beef samosas, barbecue riblets, accra (salt cod fritters), crab-spinach dip, and hummus. Don’t be alarmed if you see giant iguanas on the DJ platform or eating fern fronds next to your cabana. They were here first. Admission is 25 euros per person or 8 euros for a cabana. [$$ - $$$]

A large platter of grilled meat, fried pastries, and dipping sauces
Appetizer platter.

9. Guavaberry Colombier Tradition

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192 Rue de Colombier Saint Martin 97150 Rue de Colombier Saint Martin
Colombier 97150, St Martin

For generations, native Saint Martiners have infused Caribbean rum with spicy guavaberries. Nothing like the juicy guava fruit trees from Latin America or Asia, this native tree (Myrciaria floribunda) is in the same family as clove and allspice, and its sweet-tart berries give the rum a spicy, bittersweet flavor. “It’s not Christmas without guavaberry,” says Louis Maccow, who founded the Guavaberry Colombier with his wife, Luz-Maria Maccow. After perfecting their recipe for the traditional spirit, the Maccows created a lighter version with a softer guavaberry taste, along with a vast line of liqueurs infused with everything from mango and sorrel (hibiscus flower) to coconut and cashew fruit. The surprise hit: the creamy peanut liqueur you never knew you needed. [$$]

10. Sky's the Limit

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Bd de Grande Case
Grand-Case 97150, St Martin

One of four lolos clustered in central Grand Case right near the waterfront, Sky’s the Limit, run by Jacqueline Lake-Carty, serves generous portions of barbecued meat with lots of sides starting at 10 euros. After nearly 20 years in business, word has gotten around, so you might have to wait a while for one of the booths painted bright red, yellow, and green. But you won’t mind once you taste the ribs, whole fried snapper, lobster, or chicken served with seasoned rice, plantain, macaroni and cheese, potato salad, coleslaw, and green salad. [$ - $$]

Customers wait in line outside a beach shack restaurant with large red awning
Sky’s the Limit lolo.

11. Villa Royale Restaurant

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47 Bd de Grande Case
Grand-Case 97150, St Martin
0590 87 07 42

You don’t see him outside the kitchen often, but chef Leo Saintil has a smile that conveys the warmth of 1,000 suns. He’s originally from Haiti, so his take on Creole cuisine is slightly different from that found elsewhere in Saint-Martin. His Haitian rice is dark, thanks to the French Maggi seasoning and djon djon mushrooms. The conch fritters are light and satisfying with their light curry dip, especially paired with a glass of Herve Blin Champagne. So are the accra salt cod fritters served with spicy Haitian pikliz, the seafood cassoulet, and the grilled conch. But the dish you’ll be talking about the next day is his goat curry, which is tender, like a juicy cross between pork and beef that melds with the flavor of the curry gravy. [$$ - $$$]

A bowl filled with large chunks of goat in a thick curry with vegetables
Goat curry.

12. La part des anges

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32 bd de grand case
Grand-Case 97150, St Martin

While there’s no rum distilled in Saint-Martin (there’s not enough water to grow sugar cane), fine cane spirits from surrounding islands like Martinique and Guadeloupe are ubiquitous. You can taste your way through a selection of nearly 120 bottles at this moody, cozy rum and Cuban cigar bar next to Le Pressoir. Settle into one of the leather barrel chairs and talk with rum aficionado Jason Thomas through sips of Habitation Saint Etienne’s VSOP Très Vieux Rhum Agricole or the Trois Rivières Rhum Vieux de l’Ocean from one of Martinique’s oldest distilleries. [$$$]

A bar interior, with wooden backlit shelves of rum bottles, a blue-lit bar, and leather seating
The lounge at La part des anges.
Le Pressoir

13. Le Pressoir

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32 Boulevard de Grand Case
Grand-Case 97150, St Martin

Grand Case was once known for its abundant natural salt pond, which produced salt crystals to be ground into powder with metal presses. One of those historic salt presses is on view (along with other artifacts) in the circa-1872 Creole building that houses Le Pressoir. After working as a manager for the previous owners, Milaure Soucy took over the restaurant with partner Gill Sacconi, and the duo have reimagined it as an intimate dining experience filled with little surprises. Choose your three-course adventure from chef Jerome Droingt, who reinvigorates classic French dishes with local ingredients. Standouts include the foie gras terrine spiked with Rhum Clement, and roasted pineapple and coconut chutney, while main courses bring a rustic bouillabaisse with local fish, island-raised hen breast stuffed with porcini mushrooms, or tender Iberian pluma steak stuffed with candied duck and dressed in thyme gravy. [$$$]

A restaurant interior with white tablecloth set tables, high ceilings with wood beams, and dark foliage visible outside
The dining room at Le Pressoir.
Le Pressoir

14. La Villa Hibiscus

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Rue du Pic
Rambaud 97150, St Martin

Sitting on the Villa Hibiscus terrace near the top of Pic Paradis, the tallest mountain on the island, you can watch the sun slip behind the peach and purple horizon, a show soundtracked by the cacophony of frogs, crickets, and monkeys. It’s an unforgettable experience, rivaled only by the restaurant’s tasting menus created for just 16 guests each evening. Chef Bastian Schenk previously worked with Anne-Sophie Pic and Joël Robuchon, and his small team won top awards for cuisine and service at the 2021 Festival de la Gastronomie. The high-tech farmhouse kitchen turns out dishes like grilled chestnut mousse with black truffles, seared scallop with smoked sabayon and yuzu, and poached chicken breast stuffed with confit thigh in a mushroom ivoire sauce. His wife, Sabine, who grew up on the property, leads the adept service team. Besides the stunning view, another constant is the signature hibiscus cocktail, which makes a lovely start or end to a meal. Menus range from 60 to 150 euros per person depending on the number of courses and wine pairings. [$$$$]

A yellow and pink ombre cocktail beside a pile of bright pink orchids
Signature hibiscus cocktail.
La Villa Hibiscus

15. Bacchus

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Rue Anegada
97150, St Martin

If you love French wines and rare Caribbean rum, head to Bacchus for bottles to fill your suitcase. Magali and Benjamin Laurent import, distribute, and sell French and American wines, and they have the best cellar in the Caribbean, chockablock with cases of red and white Burgundy, Opus One, Pio Cesare, Sassicaia, and Le Petit Cheval, plus vintage Sauternes (the oldest is from 1955). And the prices are better than in most other stores; “We don’t have the taxes you have in the U.S.,” Magali says with a slight smile. Their son Valentin is barely 21, but he’s already an expert on the best Caribbean rhums and Cuban cigars. Their stock includes hand-decorated cases from Rhum Neisson and Rhum Clement, bottlings unavailable in the U.S. When you’re done shopping, pop over to Bacchus’s modern bistro for wines by the glass, salads, tartines, and desserts — including a salad-plate-sized creme brulee and Trianon, a chocolate mousse cake with a crunchy crust. [$$ - $$$$]

Three dusty bottles of sauternes on a wine rack
Sauternes in the Bacchus cellar.

16. Anse Marcel Restaurant

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26 Rue de Lonvillier Anse Marcel
97150, St Martin

The Anse Marcel Beach resort teleports guests to the French Riviera. Tastefully sized yachts are moored in the azure bay, sunbathers bronze on chaise longues, and tan umbrellas flutter in the breeze. Owner Jean-Pierre Pisoni, a native of Cannes, created a restaurant to complete the experience. The open dining area feels like a grand airy cabana where every table has an ocean view. Start with a glass of Château Puech-Haut Argali Rosé and olive tapenade crostini that firmly places the flavors in the South of France. Then dive into local white fish tartare dotted with kumquats and seaweed or a selection of French cheeses, before splurging on a local spiny lobster picked from a mod vertical tank, tenderly roasted, and paired with melted butter. The drive over the hill to Anse Marcel is quite scenic, so get your camera ready. [$$$$]

A chef in whites and a toque leans over a dish of spiny lobster
Chef Florian Mercadier.

17. L’Express Bakery

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CENTRE COMMERCIAL AVENTURA, HOPE ESTATE ST MARTIN
97150, St Martin

This popular corner bakery and cafe near the Marigot waterfront (owned by the team from Bacchus) knows their way around proper French pastries. They’ve got all your favorites — deep golden and flaky croissants, pain au chocolat, and tart au citron — along with cafe press, teas, and tisanes. The biggest revelation is the pistachio financier, which outshines other versions of the buttery cakes that are usually smaller than a business card; here, they’re delightfully large, pale green muffins. [$]

Sugar-covered macaroons in a pastry case with a handwritten sign reading ‘rocher coco’
Coconut macaroons.

18. L'Atelier Bar à Viande et Poisson

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les Amérindiens Orient Bay
SAINT MARTIN 97150, St Martin

Lyon native Alexandre Deglise originally came to Saint-Martin to work as a waiter on the beach. Today he owns L’Atelier, a steak and seafood brasserie that he runs with a team of Caribbean women he met in his 22 years in the island’s restaurant industry. Deglise happily talks guests through the chalkboard menu of plates like Brillat-Savarin cheese stuffed with black truffles, Kagoshima wagyu, seared foie gras, whole grilled fish, and Creekstone Farms rib-eye steaks. Head chef Sarah Honoré is just 24, but she’s an expert, while her girlfriend Orlane Germany, 22, runs the dining room and presents dishes tableside. Choose a bottle of Napa cab or Cotes du Rhone from the international wine list, or try one of Elise Agoha’s smoky Old Fashioneds or rum mules made with her ginger syrup. L’Atelier is one of the best dining experiences on the island by far. [$$$$]

Three people (the crew of L’Atelier Bar) stand in the entrance to their restaurant
Orlane Germany, Sarah Honoré, Alexandre Deglise.

1. Hot Spot by Bush Tea SXM

Bd de France, Marigot 97150, St Martin
A server pours a thick cocktail from a shaker into a martini glass, garnished with a piece of tamarind candy on a skewer and a tropical leaf
Tamarind martini.

Bartender Daryl Brooks’s tamarind martini is reason enough to stop by this Marigot lolo. He uses a mix of locally grown tamarind (“tamarine” in French) and vanilla to make the award-winning drink, along with Midori and maraschino cherries. “It’s more of a refreshing drink, not too strong and not too sweet,” Brooks says. Hot Spot also specializes in burgers, pasta, and grilled meat plates by chef Renoldo Fleming, who deadpans that it’s the best food on the waterfront. Breakfast might include caramelized French toast made from baguettes with bacon and fruit, and on Fridays, the kitchen barbecues everything but the oink. Another occasional delicacy is Fleming’s turtle soup, meaty and studded with tender potatoes. Saint-Martin lore says turtle soup is a natural Viagra, so it’s especially popular with male clientele. Message the lolo on Facebook to ensure the tamarind martini and turtle soup, both limited specials, are available. [$]

Bd de France
Marigot 97150, St Martin

2. Sandy’s Creole Cuisine

Pl. du Marché, Marigot 97150, St Martin
Various preparations of shrimp on a bed of ice with french fries in a basket in the background
Creole shrimp mania.

The menu at Sandy’s Creole Cuisine might look like ones you see at other Creole restaurants on the island, but there’s a big difference in the execution and intention. Owner Christine Illidge (Sandy is her father’s name) is doing something fresh: “Modern Creole without all the grease,” as she describes it. But that doesn’t mean she’s abandoning tradition. Sandy’s was crowned the best authentic Creole restaurant in Saint-Martin’s 2021 Festival de la Gastronomie. The red snapper is moist and meaty, served with fresh tomato salsa, sauteed zucchini, and green salad. If you’d prefer shrimp, choose among the barrage of preparations offered in the shrimp mania special; the tender crustaceans are served in spicy tomato sauce, lightly fried, and napped in garlic butter, but the coconut shrimp captures the ideal flavor and texture of a dish known across the Caribbean. [$$]

Pl. du Marché
Marigot 97150, St Martin

3. Rosemary’s Restaurant

3W97+7JW, Marigot 97150, St Martin
A woman, seated in a restaurant, throws out her arms in a kind expression
Rosemary Lendor.

As the proprietor of the oldest lolo in the area, Rosemary Lendor is the unofficial doyenne of the Marigot waterfront, especially after her spot was blessed with a visit by St. Anthony of Bourdain in 2012. Dressed in a bright plaid shirt that matches her tablecloths, she’s equal parts restaurateur and raconteur. Visit her for breakfast, and you’ll be rewarded with ginger-bay leaf bush tea and a heaping plate of salt fish, roasted green bananas, scrambled eggs, and a warm dish of johnnycakes, the fried or baked flatbread that’s a staple of Saint Martin Creole cuisine. [$]

3W97+7JW
Marigot 97150, St Martin

4. Chez Coco

3W97+6M8, Marigot 97150, St Martin
An open-air restaurant beneath palm frond roof, with a large banner with the name Chez Coco, and diners at tables
Outside Chez Coco.

The child of Mamie Rose, one of the island’s legendary Creole cooks and restaurateurs back in the day, Coco Lake was destined to join the family business. After returning from his military service in France, his mother encouraged him to open his own restaurant, and he’s become a fixture on the Marigot waterfront. Daily specials like goat and chicken curry and stewed oxtail sell out early in the day. He also serves steak, red snapper, tuna, salmon, and mahi-mahi prepared in various ways, but his specialty is conch Creole, a signature that you can’t find elsewhere. The conch strips are tender, with subtle flavors of butter, green bell pepper, and herbs, accompanied by seasoned rice, sweet plantain, potato salad, and green salad. The creamy mango colada is one for the books. [$ - $$]

3W97+6M8
Marigot 97150, St Martin

5. Spicymilo

3W87+QVX, Marigot 97150, St Martin
An open-air shop with bags of spices beneath chalkboard signs
The Spicymilo shop.

Nearly every Saint Martiner will tell you it’s the seasonings that make the island’s cuisine so distinctive. So before heading home, stock up at this little spice stand in Marigot run by Marianne Gregoire-Celestine (who shows off her own spicy personality in a tourism video). She and her husband started with a local version of Jamaican jerk seasoning and have expanded to include fresh nutmeg seed still in the mace, Caribbean curry powder, and magic spice, their No. 1 seller that’s good on everything from meat to pizza to a cup of bush tea. [$]

3W87+QVX
Marigot 97150, St Martin

6. Lainez Bakery

Rambaud 97150, St Martin
A person cuts into a large galette, accented by a paper crown and accompanied by several spoons
Galette des Rois.
Lainez Bakery/Facebook

The Lainez family has owned this island favorite for more than 30 years. It’s the kind of place where the walls are covered in photos of cycling and tennis teams sponsored by the restaurant. You’ll see people lined up outside during peak hours, stopping in for a cup of bush tea (tisane) which changes daily; orange juice spiked with ginger; or tropical smoothies with mango, soursop, papaya, and pineapple. On the food menu, the turnovers filled with guava paste or banana are signatures, savory croissants come filled with salt cod and tuna, and breakfast sandwiches are on offer with bacon and eggs. [$]

7. Guito Coconut/Alguy Coconut Water

Rue de Colombier, Rambaud 97150, St Martin
A couple stand outside holding a cut-open coconut
Aldrina and Guy Helligar.

There’s always lots of honking and waving when locals see friends on the road, but the loudest greetings are saved for the corner of Rue de Rambaud and Rue de Colombier, not far from the Jimmy Sheik mural “Little Girl and Butterfly.” That’s where Guy and Aldrina Helligar, friends to the whole neighborhood, serve fresh coconut water on Sunday mornings. Guy chops the tops off red, orange, and green coconuts, and Aldrina serves them with a straw. You sip, you chat, and once the juice is gone, Guy slices the coconut open so you can eat the jelly. The couple will also add a splash of gin to your juice for a hydrating hair-of-the-dog drink they call morning coffee. Coconuts are 4 euros, spiked coconuts are 5, liters of fresh coconut water are 10, and coconut jelly is 2. [$]

Rue de Colombier
Rambaud 97150, St Martin

8. Loterie Farm

Rue du Pic Paradis, St Martin 97150, St Martin
A large platter of grilled meat, fried pastries, and dipping sauces
Appetizer platter.

Loterie Farm is a sexy eco-resort where energetic visitors can hop on ziplines or hike in the tropical hills — but most people flaunt their beach bodies by the Jungle Pool. The kidney-shaped water is refreshed by waterfalls, and ringed by mango trees, variegated vines, chaise longues, and cabanas. The extensive drink menu includes rum punch, passionfruit daiquiris, pina coladas, mojitos, margaritas, and fruity zero-proof creations. The resort’s restaurant also makes everything from salads and burgers to platters filled with beef samosas, barbecue riblets, accra (salt cod fritters), crab-spinach dip, and hummus. Don’t be alarmed if you see giant iguanas on the DJ platform or eating fern fronds next to your cabana. They were here first. Admission is 25 euros per person or 8 euros for a cabana. [$$ - $$$]

Rue du Pic Paradis
St Martin 97150, St Martin

9. Guavaberry Colombier Tradition

192 Rue de Colombier Saint Martin 97150 Rue de Colombier Saint Martin, Colombier 97150, St Martin

For generations, native Saint Martiners have infused Caribbean rum with spicy guavaberries. Nothing like the juicy guava fruit trees from Latin America or Asia, this native tree (Myrciaria floribunda) is in the same family as clove and allspice, and its sweet-tart berries give the rum a spicy, bittersweet flavor. “It’s not Christmas without guavaberry,” says Louis Maccow, who founded the Guavaberry Colombier with his wife, Luz-Maria Maccow. After perfecting their recipe for the traditional spirit, the Maccows created a lighter version with a softer guavaberry taste, along with a vast line of liqueurs infused with everything from mango and sorrel (hibiscus flower) to coconut and cashew fruit. The surprise hit: the creamy peanut liqueur you never knew you needed. [$$]

192 Rue de Colombier Saint Martin 97150 Rue de Colombier Saint Martin
Colombier 97150, St Martin

10. Sky's the Limit

Bd de Grande Case, Grand-Case 97150, St Martin
Customers wait in line outside a beach shack restaurant with large red awning
Sky’s the Limit lolo.

One of four lolos clustered in central Grand Case right near the waterfront, Sky’s the Limit, run by Jacqueline Lake-Carty, serves generous portions of barbecued meat with lots of sides starting at 10 euros. After nearly 20 years in business, word has gotten around, so you might have to wait a while for one of the booths painted bright red, yellow, and green. But you won’t mind once you taste the ribs, whole fried snapper, lobster, or chicken served with seasoned rice, plantain, macaroni and cheese, potato salad, coleslaw, and green salad. [$ - $$]

Bd de Grande Case
Grand-Case 97150, St Martin

11. Villa Royale Restaurant

47 Bd de Grande Case, Grand-Case 97150, St Martin
A bowl filled with large chunks of goat in a thick curry with vegetables
Goat curry.

You don’t see him outside the kitchen often, but chef Leo Saintil has a smile that conveys the warmth of 1,000 suns. He’s originally from Haiti, so his take on Creole cuisine is slightly different from that found elsewhere in Saint-Martin. His Haitian rice is dark, thanks to the French Maggi seasoning and djon djon mushrooms. The conch fritters are light and satisfying with their light curry dip, especially paired with a glass of Herve Blin Champagne. So are the accra salt cod fritters served with spicy Haitian pikliz, the seafood cassoulet, and the grilled conch. But the dish you’ll be talking about the next day is his goat curry, which is tender, like a juicy cross between pork and beef that melds with the flavor of the curry gravy. [$$ - $$$]

47 Bd de Grande Case
Grand-Case 97150, St Martin

12. La part des anges

32 bd de grand case, Grand-Case 97150, St Martin
A bar interior, with wooden backlit shelves of rum bottles, a blue-lit bar, and leather seating
The lounge at La part des anges.
Le Pressoir

While there’s no rum distilled in Saint-Martin (there’s not enough water to grow sugar cane), fine cane spirits from surrounding islands like Martinique and Guadeloupe are ubiquitous. You can taste your way through a selection of nearly 120 bottles at this moody, cozy rum and Cuban cigar bar next to Le Pressoir. Settle into one of the leather barrel chairs and talk with rum aficionado Jason Thomas through sips of Habitation Saint Etienne’s VSOP Très Vieux Rhum Agricole or the Trois Rivières Rhum Vieux de l’Ocean from one of Martinique’s oldest distilleries. [$$$]

32 bd de grand case
Grand-Case 97150, St Martin

13. Le Pressoir

32 Boulevard de Grand Case, Grand-Case 97150, St Martin
A restaurant interior with white tablecloth set tables, high ceilings with wood beams, and dark foliage visible outside
The dining room at Le Pressoir.
Le Pressoir

Grand Case was once known for its abundant natural salt pond, which produced salt crystals to be ground into powder with metal presses. One of those historic salt presses is on view (along with other artifacts) in the circa-1872 Creole building that houses Le Pressoir. After working as a manager for the previous owners, Milaure Soucy took over the restaurant with partner Gill Sacconi, and the duo have reimagined it as an intimate dining experience filled with little surprises. Choose your three-course adventure from chef Jerome Droingt, who reinvigorates classic French dishes with local ingredients. Standouts include the foie gras terrine spiked with Rhum Clement, and roasted pineapple and coconut chutney, while main courses bring a rustic bouillabaisse with local fish, island-raised hen breast stuffed with porcini mushrooms, or tender Iberian pluma steak stuffed with candied duck and dressed in thyme gravy. [$$$]

32 Boulevard de Grand Case
Grand-Case 97150, St Martin

14. La Villa Hibiscus

Rue du Pic, Rambaud 97150, St Martin
A yellow and pink ombre cocktail beside a pile of bright pink orchids
Signature hibiscus cocktail.
La Villa Hibiscus

Sitting on the Villa Hibiscus terrace near the top of Pic Paradis, the tallest mountain on the island, you can watch the sun slip behind the peach and purple horizon, a show soundtracked by the cacophony of frogs, crickets, and monkeys. It’s an unforgettable experience, rivaled only by the restaurant’s tasting menus created for just 16 guests each evening. Chef Bastian Schenk previously worked with Anne-Sophie Pic and Joël Robuchon, and his small team won top awards for cuisine and service at the 2021 Festival de la Gastronomie. The high-tech farmhouse kitchen turns out dishes like grilled chestnut mousse with black truffles, seared scallop with smoked sabayon and yuzu, and poached chicken breast stuffed with confit thigh in a mushroom ivoire sauce. His wife, Sabine, who grew up on the property, leads the adept service team. Besides the stunning view, another constant is the signature hibiscus cocktail, which makes a lovely start or end to a meal. Menus range from 60 to 150 euros per person depending on the number of courses and wine pairings. [$$$$]

Rue du Pic
Rambaud 97150, St Martin

15. Bacchus

Rue Anegada, 97150, St Martin
Three dusty bottles of sauternes on a wine rack
Sauternes in the Bacchus cellar.

If you love French wines and rare Caribbean rum, head to Bacchus for bottles to fill your suitcase. Magali and Benjamin Laurent import, distribute, and sell French and American wines, and they have the best cellar in the Caribbean, chockablock with cases of red and white Burgundy, Opus One, Pio Cesare, Sassicaia, and Le Petit Cheval, plus vintage Sauternes (the oldest is from 1955). And the prices are better than in most other stores; “We don’t have the taxes you have in the U.S.,” Magali says with a slight smile. Their son Valentin is barely 21, but he’s already an expert on the best Caribbean rhums and Cuban cigars. Their stock includes hand-decorated cases from Rhum Neisson and Rhum Clement, bottlings unavailable in the U.S. When you’re done shopping, pop over to Bacchus’s modern bistro for wines by the glass, salads, tartines, and desserts — including a salad-plate-sized creme brulee and Trianon, a chocolate mousse cake with a crunchy crust. [$$ - $$$$]

Rue Anegada
97150, St Martin

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16. Anse Marcel Restaurant

26 Rue de Lonvillier Anse Marcel, 97150, St Martin
A chef in whites and a toque leans over a dish of spiny lobster
Chef Florian Mercadier.

The Anse Marcel Beach resort teleports guests to the French Riviera. Tastefully sized yachts are moored in the azure bay, sunbathers bronze on chaise longues, and tan umbrellas flutter in the breeze. Owner Jean-Pierre Pisoni, a native of Cannes, created a restaurant to complete the experience. The open dining area feels like a grand airy cabana where every table has an ocean view. Start with a glass of Château Puech-Haut Argali Rosé and olive tapenade crostini that firmly places the flavors in the South of France. Then dive into local white fish tartare dotted with kumquats and seaweed or a selection of French cheeses, before splurging on a local spiny lobster picked from a mod vertical tank, tenderly roasted, and paired with melted butter. The drive over the hill to Anse Marcel is quite scenic, so get your camera ready. [$$$$]

26 Rue de Lonvillier Anse Marcel
97150, St Martin

17. L’Express Bakery

CENTRE COMMERCIAL AVENTURA, HOPE ESTATE ST MARTIN, 97150, St Martin
Sugar-covered macaroons in a pastry case with a handwritten sign reading ‘rocher coco’
Coconut macaroons.

This popular corner bakery and cafe near the Marigot waterfront (owned by the team from Bacchus) knows their way around proper French pastries. They’ve got all your favorites — deep golden and flaky croissants, pain au chocolat, and tart au citron — along with cafe press, teas, and tisanes. The biggest revelation is the pistachio financier, which outshines other versions of the buttery cakes that are usually smaller than a business card; here, they’re delightfully large, pale green muffins. [$]

CENTRE COMMERCIAL AVENTURA, HOPE ESTATE ST MARTIN
97150, St Martin

18. L'Atelier Bar à Viande et Poisson

les Amérindiens Orient Bay, SAINT MARTIN 97150, St Martin
Three people (the crew of L’Atelier Bar) stand in the entrance to their restaurant
Orlane Germany, Sarah Honoré, Alexandre Deglise.

Lyon native Alexandre Deglise originally came to Saint-Martin to work as a waiter on the beach. Today he owns L’Atelier, a steak and seafood brasserie that he runs with a team of Caribbean women he met in his 22 years in the island’s restaurant industry. Deglise happily talks guests through the chalkboard menu of plates like Brillat-Savarin cheese stuffed with black truffles, Kagoshima wagyu, seared foie gras, whole grilled fish, and Creekstone Farms rib-eye steaks. Head chef Sarah Honoré is just 24, but she’s an expert, while her girlfriend Orlane Germany, 22, runs the dining room and presents dishes tableside. Choose a bottle of Napa cab or Cotes du Rhone from the international wine list, or try one of Elise Agoha’s smoky Old Fashioneds or rum mules made with her ginger syrup. L’Atelier is one of the best dining experiences on the island by far. [$$$$]

les Amérindiens Orient Bay
SAINT MARTIN 97150, St Martin

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