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Helen Rosner

The 38 Essential Paris Restaurants

Where to find perfect steak frites, matcha-filled crepes, roasted chicken and wine, and lamb-laden couscous in the City of Light

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Over the last 10 years, Paris has boldly reclaimed its title as the best food city in Europe. The French capital is bustling with a brilliant constellation of new restaurants by talented young chefs from all over the world, plus an inventive and diverse array of casual dining options. There's also been a renaissance of its long-established gastronomic landscape, including traditional bistros, brasseries, and stylish restaurants serving classic French cooking made famous by Escoffier, including dishes like blanquette de veau (veal in cream sauce) and pistachio soufflés.

July 2018 Update:

As usual, some restaurants must leave the list to make way for the new ones:

  • Paris is experiencing an unexpected revival in affordable dining. So, while Les Philosophes, Café Trama, and Chez Aline are still worth recommending, they make way for the more affordable Aux Bons Crus, Hugo & Co, and Le Rigmarole.
  • Regional French cooking is making a comeback with outstanding new restaurants like Baieta, which specializes in Niçoise and Provencal cuisine, which replaces Chez Denise-La Tour de Montlhéry. La Table de Hugo Desnoyer steps aside for L’Assiette, where you’ll find an excellent cassoulet from southwestern France, among other Gallic classics. Couscous plays an important role in France, both gastronomically and historically, so Zerda Café makes way for Mansouria, which is now serving some of the best couscous in the French capital.
  • The small-plates trend still going strong, and Clamato, chef Bertrand Grebaut’s casual seafood spot, will replace the Clown Bar, which is settling in with a new chef now that Atsumi Sota has left to open his own restaurant.
  • Replacing Divellec and Grand Cœur is recently opened Comice, a slick restaurant by Canadian-born chef Noam Gedalof and sommelier Etheliya Hananova (the two are married).

Prices per person, excluding alcohol:

$ = Less than €10 (USD 11)
$$ = €10 - €35 (USD 11 - 40)
$$$ = €35 - €75 (USD 40 - 83)
$$$$ = More than €75 (USD 83)

Looking for a more comprehensive take on Paris, from the hottest new restaurants to a ranking of the best macarons? Consult the Eater Guide to Paris.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Comice

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31 Avenue de Versailles
75016 Paris, France
01 42 15 55 70
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The bulk of Paris’s famed haute cuisine is fiscally out of reach for many. However the year-old Comice, headed by Canadian chef Noam Gedalof and sommelier Etheliya Hananova (the two are married), is an indulgence that won’t completely melt your credit card. The look strikes a similar balance: elegant but relaxed, with striking arrangements from a renowned local florist. Hananova’s wine list — which features lesser-known wines from around the world — is terrific, as is Gedalof’s light, inventive contemporary French cooking. Try the duck foie gras with hazelnuts, strawberries, balsamic, and black pepper or the butter-poached lobster with sweet pea and mascarpone ravioli. [$$$]

2. L'Astrance

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4 rue Beethoven
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 40 50 84 40
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The one haute-cuisine restaurant in Paris that’s really, truly worth it? L’Astrance. Chef Pascal Barbot has the most elegantly lyrical gastronomic imagination of any chef working in Paris today, and it’s expressed by dishes that are often spectacularly simple, like his buttermilk and burnt toast crumb soup. The dish is not always on the menu, but if you tell them you’re desperate for it when you make your reservation, Barbot and maitre d’hotel Christophe Rohat are such nice guys, they might make it for you. Otherwise, you should beg for the mille-feuille of white mushrooms, apple, and foie gras. [$$$$]

3. Hugo & Co

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34-36 Rue La Perouse
75116 Paris, France
01 83 79 94 00
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It’s been a while since an outstanding restaurant opened in the historic Latin Quarter, which is why Cambodian-born Tomy Gousset’s new place has been such a hit. Here, the chef — who spent time in the New York restaurant scene — preps a first-rate small-plates menu that will please both vegetarians and carnivores. Standout dishes include the savory pancake with guanciale; a breaded free-range pork cutlet with a fried egg, black rice, red cabbage, and curry sauce; and a black chocolate tart with puffed buckwheat and cappuccino ice cream. It’s an instant local favorite. [$$]

Tabletop spread at Hugo & Co.
Photo: Hugo & Co

4. Au Petit Tonneau

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20 Rue Surcouf
75007 Paris, France
(+33) 1 47 05 09 01
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Of course you want to discover a fabulous little bistro in Paris none of your friends have ever heard of. This is the place, and the blanquette de veau — a homey classic of veal in cream sauce with mushrooms, onions, and carrots — is the reason you'll never forget it. At 22 euros, it's a great buy, too. [$$]

Au Petit Tonneau
Au Petit Tonneau official

5. Restaurant David Toutain

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29 rue Surcouf
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 45 50 11 10
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After working with Alain Passard and Marc Veyrat, Toutain first wowed Paris at Agapé Substance, a hole in the wall in Saint-Germain. Now he has his own place, and his constantly changing tasting menus (55 euros at lunch, 80 euros or 110 euros at dinner) deliver the boldest and most interesting food in Paris. Think dishes like seared foie gras in baked potato bouillon with black truffles; a monochromatic white composition of cuttlefish with yuba; and nearly translucent Parmesan gnocchi, seasoned with the juice extracted from cooking the cheese at very low temperatures for hours. [$$$]

6. L’Arpège

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84 rue de Varenne
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 47 05 09 06
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Okay, it costs a freaking fortune (145 euros), but the vegetarian tasting menu by three-Michelin-starred chef Alain Passard is as close to nirvana as Paris can deliver for vegetarians. It’s so good that accompanying non-vegetarians will forget they came as a somewhat selfless gesture, too. Passard’s vegetables come from his own organic farm, and what you’ll get depends on what's available at the time. A sample of Passard’s talent with the bounty of the garden includes dishes like cep mushrooms with lemon and a vol au vent (puff pastry case) filled with baby peas, turnips, and snow peas in a sauce spiked with Cote du Jura wine. It’s worth pointing out that people have strong feelings about L’Arpège — the restaurant has its share of critics, including Eater’s own Ryan Sutton. [$$$$]

7. Veal Sweetbreads at Le Grand Restaurant

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7 rue d'Aguesseau
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 53 05 00 00
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The French have a genius for offal cooking, especially veal sweetbreads. Maybe you love them already, but if not, there’s no better souvenir to take home from Paris than a newly discovered favorite dish. The place to make this happen is Jean-François Piège’s Le Grand Restaurant: He cooks the sweetbreads on walnut shells in a hot box and serves them with walnut mousseline and morels. [$$$$]

8. Joséphine Chez Dumonet

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117 rue du Cherche-Midi
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 145-485240
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With its lace curtains, cut-glass room dividers, and bentwood chairs, this century-old bistro is why you put up with all those terrible hours in economy class to get to Paris. The boeuf bourguignon, a testament to the Gallic genius of creating a flavor-rich sauce from the juices created by slowly simmering meat, is the best in the city. You must book in advance, and don’t miss the Grand Marnier souffle for dessert either. [$$$]

9. L'Assiette

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181 Rue du Château
75014 Paris, France
01 43 22 64 86
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It is quiet, hard-working, limelight-shunning chefs like David Rathgeber who make Paris such an enduringly terrific food city. He took over this locally famous restaurant — previously helmed by a flamboyant chef named Lulu who charmed the likes of late President François Mitterrand and other celebrities — and has made it one of the city’s best bistros. It’s well worth the trek to the quiet 14th Arrondissement for his deft take on traditional dishes like pork-knuckle rillettes with foie gras and a superb cassoulet. The menu also offers lighter fare, including sea bream tartare with green tomato and coriander jus and cuttlefish carbonara. The creme caramel is nothing short of epic. [$$$]

A seafood dish at L’Assiette
Photo: L’Assiette/Facebook

10. Le Severo

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8 rue des Plantes
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 45 40 40 91
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William Bernet used to be a butcher, so he knows his meat. His steaks are superb, but his pride and joy is the steak tartare he hand-chops from premium French beef and then seasons with a light hand. It comes to the table with an avalanche of some of the city’s best frites. [$$]

Steak at Le Severo
Le Severo/Facebook

11. Détour

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Rue de la Tour des Dames
Paris, Île-de-France

On a quiet side street in the heart of the city, not far from Pigalle, chef Adrien Cachot’s storefront bistro is one of the best buys in Paris right now. After working in a variety of top-notch kitchens, Cachot opened Detour, his first restaurant. Expect skilled contemporary French cooking and a frequently changing menu that consistently exhibits a well-edited creativity, as seen in dishes like cod with a soubise, mussel emulsion, and powdered grilled onions. Cachot’s beef heart, a piece of offal that’s suddenly a la mode in Paris, comes in fine slices with fromage blanc and harissa; it’s succulent and quietly funky. [$$]

12. Oysters at l’Huîtrerie Régis

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3 rue de Montfaucon
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 44 41 10 07
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This minuscule, white-painted, no-reservations raw bar in the heart of Saint-Germain-des-Prés is a pearl, and it serves the best bivalves in Paris. The owner gets them shipped daily from the Marennes d’Oléron region on France’s Atlantic coast. Every customer is required to order at least a dozen oysters, which come with really good bread and excellent salted butter. [$$]

A plateau at l’Huîtrerie Régis
Huitrerie Regis/Facebook

13. Ellsworth

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34 rue de Richelieu
Paris, Île-de-France

Even in Paris, you don’t always want to make a fuss about where you’re going to eat. When this happens, head for Ellsworth, American chef Braden Perkins’s small-plates restaurant, where you can sit at the bar and tuck into some great nibbles without the hassle of making a reservation. Go early and don’t miss the buttermilk fried chicken; the quality of French fowl hits this comfort-food classic out of the park. [$$]

14. Le Bon Georges

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45 rue Saint-Georges
Paris, Île-de-France

As soaring Left Bank real estate prices have pushed many Parisians across the Seine, the Ninth Arrondissement is becoming the new Saint-Germain-des-Prés with a thriving restaurant scene. One of the most popular restaurants in this food-loving neighborhood is charming proprietor Benoit Duval-Arnould’s postcard-perfect bistro near the Place Saint Georges. Le Bon Georges is one of the rare Paris restaurants to offer Polmard beef (from Lorraine in eastern France), and the bone marrow with mushrooms and verjus is sublime. Those who prefer fish should opt for the yellow pollack with rhubarb meuniere and leeks. The wine list is epic. [$$-$$$]

15. Guy Savoy

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11 quai de Conti
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 4380 40 61
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Paris haute cuisine is a nerve-wracking tightrope walk: What if you spend all that money and the meal doesn’t make your brain explode? There are ways to play it safe. Every day at lunch, Restaurant Guy Savoy reserves one table for guests who want to make a splash without completely destroying the bank. For 110 euros a head, you choose a starter, main course, and dessert from the a la carte menu, then the sommelier will propose several wines by the glass for 10 euros apiece. The reservation has to be made online, and is only available at noon. Order the artichoke and black truffle soup as your first course and it will immediately become one of the best things you’ve ever eaten. What happens next is up to you. [$$$$]

16. Taloa at A. Noste

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6 bis rue du 4 Septembre
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 47 03 91 91
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Chef Julien Duboue serves big, juicy, savory taloa — floppy Basque-style sandwiches that are stuffed with confit de canard, hot chorizo, or pork belly. This restaurant also serves a terrific menu of Basque tapas, and the upstairs prix-fixe dining room offers outstanding southwestern French farm food that’s been dressed up for Parisians. [$]

Taloa with chorizo, tomato, and guindillas at A. Noste
A. Noste official

17. La Bourse et la Vie

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12 rue Vivienne
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 42 60 08 83
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Chef Daniel Rose’s second Paris restaurant has become one of Paris’s best bistros, because he delivers superb versions of the rock-of-ages French dishes that people yearn to eat. His superb foie gras de canard comes to the table perched on a fresh artichoke heart with a dribble of aspic-like shallot vinaigrette on the side, a brilliant detail. Don’t miss the collier d’agneau provencal (braised lamb neck Provençal style) either. [$$]

Steak frites at La Bourse et La Vie
La Bourse et La Vie/Facebook

18. Chez la Vieille

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1 rue Bailleul
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 142-601578
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Chicago-born chef Daniel Rose strikes gold again. Hard on the heels of La Bourse et La Vie in Paris and Le Coucou in New York City, his latest Paris table is a suave revival of one of the city’s most famous old bistros. To bring this legendary space back to life, Rose cooked his way through founder Adrienne Biasin's iconic cookbook and lovingly brought some of the legendary “vieille's” (old lady) recipes back to life with a welcome touch of modernity by making them both lighter and often more flavorful. A perfect example is the blanquette de veau, the velvety stew of veal, mushrooms, carrots, and baby onions in a luscious white sauce — don’t miss it. [$$$]

19. Tentation de Saint-Antoine at Au Pied de Cochon

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6 rue Coquillière
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 40 13 77 00
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Channel your inner Anthony Bourdain and Andrew Zimmern by ordering the Tentation de Saint-Antoine (the Temptation of Saint Anthony), served at this famous brasserie in Les Halles that’s been open nonstop — 24/7 — since it opened in 1947. Saint Anthony is the patron saint of charcutiers, and this plate includes a muzzle, ears, breaded pig’s foot, and a tail with lashings of Béarnaise sauce. [$$]

20. Pork Katsu Sandwich at Abri

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92 rue du Faubourg Poissonnière
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 83 97 00 00

Japanese chef Katsuaki Okiyama used to work at Taillevent and Joel Robuchon, a pedigree that shows through in his superb and affordable lunch menu (26 euros), which may feature dishes like raw mackerel with an arugula jus, slivered almonds, herbs, and flowers, or cod with a celery-root puree and black-olive emulsion. But the pork katsu sandwich is reason you’ll find lines in the street here on Mondays and Saturdays. The large, juicy breaded pork sandwich comes with a drink and a slice of cake, and makes for a seriously good lunch. (Bonus: Abri has recently opened a superb soba shop nearby at 10 rue Saulnier, Ninth Arrondissement.) [$]

21. Jiaozi at Raviolis Chinois Nord-Est

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115 rue Saint-Denis
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 9 81 17 19 08

It’s a hole in the wall, with only 18 places and rudimentary service, but the homemade jiaozi — small Beijing-style dumplings — are probably best meal in Paris you’ll find for a fiver. Served grilled or boiled by the 10s, they're stuffed with your choice of pork and green cabbage; mushrooms, beef, and celery; egg, chives, and shrimp; or tofu, mushrooms, and green cabbage. [$]

22. Les Arlots

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136 rue du Faubourg Poissonnière
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 142-829201
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The neighborhood near the Gare du Nord train station is nondescript, and this tiny bistrot a vins packs its clients in like sardines. No one minds the humdrum location or the crowding, though, because it serves some of the best and most reasonably priced French comfort food in Paris. Chef Thomas Brachet’s chalkboard menu changes daily but offers an irresistible mix of contemporary dishes — like a salad of green beans, apricots, speck, and fresh almonds and John Dory meuniere with vegetable accras (beignets) — and traditional ones, which may include langoustines with homemade mayonnaise and the best homemade sausage and potato puree in Paris. The stuffed cabbage and rice pudding with cinnamon and orange shouldn’t be missed either. Be sure to book a few days ahead of time. [$$]

23. Baieta

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5 Rue de Pontoise
75005 Paris, France
01 42 02 59 19
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Nice native chef Julia Sedefdjian, 23, won her first Michelin star when she was 21, and has gone out on her own to open a lively restaurant in the Latin Quarter. With the assistance of sous chef Sébastien Jean-Joseph and maitre d’ Grégory Anelka, she serves a personal take on the traditional cooking of her hometown. Bare wood tables fill the dining room, and black-and-white drawings by the team’s favorite tattoo artist adorn the walls. Dishes worth trying include the Jaune d’oeuf croustillante, an egg yolk inside a hollow deep-fried sphere of breadcrumbs on a bed of raw and smoked haddock, and the bouillabeita, the chef’s delicate take on bouillabaisse, the traditional fish stew of Provence. [$$$]

A cod and seafood dish at Baieta
Photo: Baieta/Facebook

24. Paris–Brest at Chez Michel

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10 Rue de Belzunce
75010 Paris, France
(+33) 1 44 53 06 20

This famous French dessert was created in 1891 in honor of a bicycle race between the two namesake cities, and Brittany-born chef Thierry Breton serves up the best version in either city. At his superb bistro near the Gare du Nord, the Paris–Brest comes to table as a split choux pastry filled with a sublime praline mousse and garnished with caramelized nuts. [$$]

25. Sellae

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18 Rue des Wallons
75013 Paris, France
01 43 31 36 04

Young chef Thibault Sombardier is on a roll. After making a name for himself with Mensae bistro in the 18th Arrondissement, he’s back with an off-the-beaten-path destination at the corner of the 13th Arrondissement near the Gare d’Austerlitz. Come during lunch for the 19 euro and 22 euro prix-fixe menus. The chalkboard offerings change almost daily, but stay true to Sombardier’s forte: rustic contemporary French comfort food like mussels cooked with vin jaune and chorizo, guinea hen in cream sauce with morels, and a superb chocolate mousse. [$$]

Oeuf mollet au vert at Sellae
Photo: Sellae Restaurant/Instagram

26. Pho Tai

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13 rue Philibert Lucot
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 45 85 97 36

The 13th Arrondissement is the largest of Paris’s Asian neighborhoods, with a mixed population originating from China, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. Head to Pho Tai for an excellent bon-bun composed of freshly made nem (deep-fried spring rolls) and sauteed beef on a bed of rice noodles with a umami-rich sauce. The namesake pho is very good, too. [$]

27. Crêpes at Breizh Café

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111 rue Vieille du Temple
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 42 71 39 44
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Brittany-born Bertrand Larcher’s brilliant creperies are found everywhere from Cancale to Tokyo. In Paris, Larcher’s kitchen stars first-rate Breton produce, and his outpost in the Marais is a terrific choice for a meal of galettes and crêpes. Go with a smoked herring- and potato-filled galette, then tuck into a matcha and white chocolate mousse-filled crepe garnished with strawberries. [$]

28. Le Rigmarole

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10 Rue du Grand Prieuré
75011 Paris, France
01 71 24 58 44
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After working at New York’s Yakitori Tori Shin, French-American chef Robert Compagnon became obsessed with cooking over Japanese binchotan charcoal, and returned to Paris to open a place dedicated to it. It has since become a hit with crowds who fill the walnut bar and tables for succulent dishes like sea bream and preserved lemon tartare, chicken thighs with clementine zest, and grilled zucchini with taramasalata. Don’t miss the meatballs with paratha flatbread and co-owner and pastry chef Jessica Yang’s unique desserts, including chocolate fondant with praline and buckwheat ice cream. Open on Sunday night, too. [$$]

Fanciulle with pigeon liver ragout at Le Rigmarole
Photo: Le Rigmarole/Facebook

29. Chocolate Mousse at L’Amarante

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4 Rue Biscornet
75012 Paris, France
(+33) 09 50 80 93 80

At his Edward Hopper-like bistro near the Bastille, chef Christophe Philippe serves the best chocolate mousse in Paris. It’s made from the sublime chocolate produced by Italian Claudio Corallo on the tiny African islands of Sao Tome et Principe. Unctuous, funky, deep, this dark fluff will leave you with a craving you’ll never, ever escape. [$$]

30. Pianovins

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46 Rue Trousseau
75011 Paris, France
01 48 06 95 85
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Located in a buzzy residential neighborhood near the Place de la Bastille (in the same lucky space that once housed standouts Rino and Les Déserteurs), Pianovins is an easy-going modern bistro from Eric Mancio and Michel Roncière. The pair previously worked for acclaimed chef Guy Savoy, and continue to present flawless professionalism amid cloth-free oak tables, charcoal pendant lamps, and toast-colored walls. The effortless excellence of Roncière’s cooking comes through in the menu, which changes often and features dishes like white asparagus with grilled pork belly and coddled egg, duck breast with roasted eggplant, and pear clafoutis with cinnamon ice cream. Places like this are why Paris continues to be one of the world’s greatest gastronomic capitals. [$$]

Gravlax at Pianovins
Photo: Pianovins/Facebook

31. Aux Bons Crus

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54 Rue Godefroy Cavaignac
75011 Paris, France
01 45 67 21 13
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The tongue-in-cheek decor nods to les routiers, the roadside restaurants once frequented by truck drivers — think red-and-white checkered tablecloths, plastic bread baskets, and moleskin banquettes. Deals like a solid two-course meal for $30, including wine, have kept this jaunty bistro with a monthly changing menu packed since it opened. Expect dishes like celery remoulade with crabmeat, steak au poivre, stuffed cabbage, beef braised with carrots, and chocolate mousse. [$$]

Roast chicken at Aux Bons Crus
Photo: Restaurant les Marches/Facebook

32. Septime

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80 rue de Charonne
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 143-673829
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Given how hard it is to score a reservation at chef Bertrand Grébaut’s relaxed modern bistro, you’ll probably come to the table expecting a meal that will induce instant rapture. But that’s not Grébaut’s style. Instead, his cooking is “innocent, spontaneous, and balanced,” in the chef’s own words, which translates to superbly delicate, subtle dishes like mushrooms with oyster and foie gras bouillon or seared tuna with raspberries and tomato water. Service is friendly and easygoing, and the loft-like space is airy. [$$$]

33. Clamato

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80 Rue de Charonne
75011 Paris, France
01 43 72 74 53
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Chef Bertrand Grébaut’s seafood bar is one of the hottest places in Paris right now. It does not take reservations, so if you want to beat the line, try to go right when it opens, at 7 p.m., or late, after 10 p.m. The menu changes daily, but offers dishes like smoked shrimp with roasted red pepper and white beans, tuna tartare, ceviche, oysters, crab fritters, and more. It also boasts terrific platters of raw seafood like clams, shrimp, sea snails, and other seaworthy delights. [$$]

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34. Le Servan

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32 rue Saint-Maur
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 1 55 28 51 82
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Chef Tatiana Levha’s market-driven cosmopolitan French cooking reflects both her French-Russian-Filipino background and her training at two of the most exalted temples of haute cuisine in Paris, Arpège and L’Astrance. Occupying an old cafe with wedding-cake molding on the ceiling, Le Servan pulls an arty young crowd from one of the last authentically bohemian neighborhoods in Paris. A perfect example of her cooking is the steamed baby clams in a chile-spiked, coriander-brightened fish sauce, which is usually on the menu here. But don’t sweat it if they’re not, since everything she cooks is fresh, vivid, and generously served. [$$]

35. Mokonuts

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5 rue Saint-Bernard
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 611-955912
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The talented couple Omar Koreitem and Moko Hirayama run this friendly cafe-bakery, the place to head for a casual but outstanding lunch or snack. Franco-Lebanese chef Koreitem creates the savory dishes, such as bonito with spring tabbouleh, while Japanese chef Hirayama is a superb baker, serving up fennel, pickled lemon, and almond cookies and flourless chocolate layer cake with coffee-mascarpone cream. Open from 8:45 a.m. to 6 p.m., it’s deservedly one of the most popular recent openings in eastern Paris. [$$]

36. Le Baratin

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3 rue Jouye-Rouve
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 143-493970

When Paris chefs want to unwind they head for this little wine bar in Belleville where Argentine-born self-taught chef Raquel Carena serves up some of the most deeply satisfying food in Paris. The chalkboard menu changes constantly, but Carena loves offal and fish, and her palate favors tart and sweet-and-sour flavors, as seen in recent dishes like mackerel tartare with smoked vinegar, tuna steak with black cherries, and rabbit and mushroom ragout with red-wine sauce. The bohemian soul of rapidly gentrifying Belleville has taken refuge here, too. So go now while the good times last. [$$$]

37. Le Mansouria

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11 Rue Faidherbe
75011 Paris, France
01 43 71 00 16
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Chef and cookbook author Fatema Hal is the best-known Moroccan chef in Paris, and her lovely Moroccan restaurant on an unassuming side street in the 11th Arrondissement is a favorite of local chefs. Do as the pros do and start off with some goat cheese- or lamb-filled briwattes (pastry turnovers) or a salad of carrots perfumed with orange-flower water, and then tuck into one of the excellent couscous dishes — maybe the Fez style with lamb, raisins, onions, and chickpeas, or the Casablanca version with chicken, vegetables, raisins, and chickpeas. They’re the best in Paris, and also available in vegetarian versions. Try the homemade Moroccan pastries. [$$]

Coucous at Le Mansouria
Photo: Mansouria/Facebook

38. Fulgurances

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10 rue Alexandre Dumas
Paris, Île-de-France
(+33) 143-481459
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Three French food writers (Hugo Hivernat, Sophie Coribert, and Rebecca Asthalter) opened this laid-back restaurant with bare wood tables and an open kitchen to serve as an incubator for new culinary talent. The idea is to showcase young chefs who’ve arrived at a critical moment in their career, like a sous chef who wants to become a head chef, or a chef about to open his or her own restaurant. Since this welcoming place opened in October 2015, it’s earned quite a reputation for being one of the most consistently exciting tables in town. Check the website to see who’s currently in the kitchen here. [$$-$$$]

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1. Comice

31 Avenue de Versailles, 75016 Paris, France

The bulk of Paris’s famed haute cuisine is fiscally out of reach for many. However the year-old Comice, headed by Canadian chef Noam Gedalof and sommelier Etheliya Hananova (the two are married), is an indulgence that won’t completely melt your credit card. The look strikes a similar balance: elegant but relaxed, with striking arrangements from a renowned local florist. Hananova’s wine list — which features lesser-known wines from around the world — is terrific, as is Gedalof’s light, inventive contemporary French cooking. Try the duck foie gras with hazelnuts, strawberries, balsamic, and black pepper or the butter-poached lobster with sweet pea and mascarpone ravioli. [$$$]

31 Avenue de Versailles
75016 Paris, France

2. L'Astrance

4 rue Beethoven, Paris, Île-de-France

The one haute-cuisine restaurant in Paris that’s really, truly worth it? L’Astrance. Chef Pascal Barbot has the most elegantly lyrical gastronomic imagination of any chef working in Paris today, and it’s expressed by dishes that are often spectacularly simple, like his buttermilk and burnt toast crumb soup. The dish is not always on the menu, but if you tell them you’re desperate for it when you make your reservation, Barbot and maitre d’hotel Christophe Rohat are such nice guys, they might make it for you. Otherwise, you should beg for the mille-feuille of white mushrooms, apple, and foie gras. [$$$$]

4 rue Beethoven
Paris, Île-de-France

3. Hugo & Co

34-36 Rue La Perouse, 75116 Paris, France
Tabletop spread at Hugo & Co.
Photo: Hugo & Co

It’s been a while since an outstanding restaurant opened in the historic Latin Quarter, which is why Cambodian-born Tomy Gousset’s new place has been such a hit. Here, the chef — who spent time in the New York restaurant scene — preps a first-rate small-plates menu that will please both vegetarians and carnivores. Standout dishes include the savory pancake with guanciale; a breaded free-range pork cutlet with a fried egg, black rice, red cabbage, and curry sauce; and a black chocolate tart with puffed buckwheat and cappuccino ice cream. It’s an instant local favorite. [$$]

34-36 Rue La Perouse
75116 Paris, France

4. Au Petit Tonneau

20 Rue Surcouf, 75007 Paris, France
Au Petit Tonneau
Au Petit Tonneau official

Of course you want to discover a fabulous little bistro in Paris none of your friends have ever heard of. This is the place, and the blanquette de veau — a homey classic of veal in cream sauce with mushrooms, onions, and carrots — is the reason you'll never forget it. At 22 euros, it's a great buy, too. [$$]

20 Rue Surcouf
75007 Paris, France

5. Restaurant David Toutain

29 rue Surcouf, Paris, Île-de-France

After working with Alain Passard and Marc Veyrat, Toutain first wowed Paris at Agapé Substance, a hole in the wall in Saint-Germain. Now he has his own place, and his constantly changing tasting menus (55 euros at lunch, 80 euros or 110 euros at dinner) deliver the boldest and most interesting food in Paris. Think dishes like seared foie gras in baked potato bouillon with black truffles; a monochromatic white composition of cuttlefish with yuba; and nearly translucent Parmesan gnocchi, seasoned with the juice extracted from cooking the cheese at very low temperatures for hours. [$$$]

29 rue Surcouf
Paris, Île-de-France

6. L’Arpège

84 rue de Varenne, Paris, Île-de-France