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Parmesan scallops at Mercado de Rafael
Liliana López Sorzano

The 38 Essential Lima Restaurants

Where to find the best street-cart skewers, Nikkei sushi rolls, and Amazonian tasting menus in Peru’s capital city

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Parmesan scallops at Mercado de Rafael
| Liliana López Sorzano

There are few cities in Latin America that pride themselves on cuisine as much as Lima. It’s not uncommon for the taxi driver whisking you away from the airport to launch into small talk about his favorite spots to eat sudado or ceviche. Many Limeños simply love to talk about food.

“Some might describe Lima as a sad or nostalgic city because of its gray sky and sea,” says food and travel writer Liliana López Sorzano, who splits her time between the Peruvian capital, Bogotá, and Mexico City. But, López Sorzano adds, hearty seasoning and colorful cuisine make up for any unattractive weather. In this kingdom of potatoes and tubers, the city also boasts plentiful seafood, creating a uniquely broad pantry. The extensive catalog of ingredients, along with the juxtaposition of cultural influences — Spanish, Arabic, African, Chinese, Japanese, and Italian — make Lima an exciting place to eat.

From avant-garde restaurants to thriving street carts, here are the most essential ways to experience the unmistakable taste of Lima.

Editor’s Note: Eater is not updating international maps at this time given disruptions to global travel during the COVID-19 crisis.

Prices per person, excluding alcohol:

$ = Less than 24 sol (Less than 7 USD)

$$ = 27 - 66 sol (8-20 USD)

$$$ = 71 - 170 sol (21-50 USD)

$$$$ = More than 173 sol (51 USD and up)

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. El Chinito

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Jr. Chancay 894, Cercado de Lima
Lima 1, Peru

Sánguches (sandwiches) are an important part of Peruvian culture and usually enjoyed at breakfast, although you can enjoy them at any time. Chinese immigrant Félix Yong opened this traditional sangucheria in 1960 in Lima’s historic center. The signature sandwich is the chicharrón: a French baguette filled with fried pork that’s both crunchy and juicy, topped with sweet potato, yellow-pepper sauce, salsa criolla (onion, lime, rocoto pepper, parsley), and pickled purple onions. There is usually a line if you arrive before midday, but it moves fast. [$-$$]

A server in a branded apron and chef’s toque lifts the top bun of a sandwich while using tongs to add ingredients.
A server prepares a sandwich
Nicholas Gill

2. Osso

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Tahiti 175
Lima 15026, Peru

Vegetarians, look away; this place is meant for meat lovers. Renzo Garibaldi started Osso as a butcher shop in the upscale suburb of La Molina and has since expanded with a full restaurant, as well as a franchise in the San Isidro district. Head to the La Molina restaurant and grab one of the 12 seats at Garibaldi’s tasting-menu-only butcher’s table. The feast begins with house-made charcuterie, followed by tartare, hot dogs, sliders, and grilled cuts in various dry-age stages, all showcasing the chef’s skills and profound knowledge of both meat and fire. And dessert? You can expect bacon to feature. [$$$-$$$$]

A thick hunk of marbled meat grills directly on a coal fire
Osso’s grill at work
Nicholas Gill

3. Don Fernando Restaurante

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Av. Gral. Eugenio Garzón 1788
Jesús María 15072, Peru

Every day, two brothers alternate as cook and floor manager at this institution of traditional northern Peruvian cuisine. The restaurant has been in operation for 27 years, but the humble dining room still gets packed at lunch from Tuesday to Sunday, with diners seated around a fig tree in the middle of the room. Garlic, onion, chile, tomato, and lemon star in the brothers’ energetic seasoning, and Don Fernando is especially known for hearty stews, as well as seafood and fish dishes like ceviches. If you order the fresh clams (only served on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays), the server will likely advise you, “If they don’t move, return them.” [$$$]

Slices of raw sole sit on a dish in a bath of olive oil, topped with minced onion and garlic, and garnished with a sprig of herbs.
Sole tiradito with olive oil, onion and garlic
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

4. Antigua Taberna Queirolo

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Av. San Martin 1090, Pueblo Libre
Lima Lima 21, Peru

This quintessential restaurant, located on a corner in the working-class neighborhood of Pueblo Libre, was founded in 1880 as a grocery store and winery. Taberna Queirolo serves traditional Peruvian dishes, such as cau cau (cow tripe stew), aji de gallina (chicken stew with aji peppers), corn tamales, and pork sandwiches. Order a ruleta, a shareable appetizer plate that features small portions of three to four classic recipes. And if you really want to eat like the locals, get a res, a tray that comes with a bottle of pisco, a liter of ginger ale, limes, sugar, and sour cherry syrup so you can prepare chilcano cocktails for yourself. [$$]

A sandwich, sliced down the middle and overflowing with pork and red onions, fills a plate that sits alone on a bar.
Sandwich with jamón de la casa
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

5. La Picante

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Av. Húsares de Junin 651
Jesús María 15072, Peru

Tucked away in the Jesús María district far from the usual gastronomic areas, this casual and colorful restaurant run by Fransua Robles specializes in traditional Peruvian staples, with an emphasis on the raw bar. The kitchen sources fresh market produce daily. If it’s in season, order the sea urchin ceviche, and don’t miss the popular clams with lemon or the chef’s homey rice dishes. [$$]

A shot from above of a skilled with a large hunk of roasted pork, rice, vegetables, and a large mound of bright sliced cabbage in the center.
Pork rice
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

6. Anticuchería Doña Pochita

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Av. Ignacio Merino 2316
Lince 15046, Peru
+51 961 713 253
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On a busy street of the Lince neighborhood, a line of people wait to eat anticuchos (beef skewers) from Doña Pochita’s little street cart, which opens every day from 5 p.m. until midnight. Pochita has laid claim to this corner for more than 20 years. She grills beef heart marinated with panca chile, vinegar, garlic, cumin, salt, and pepper, and serves the skewers with slices of potatoes and chile sauce. The cart also offers tripe, sweetbreads, chicken hearts and breast, and for dessert, picarones and rice pudding with purple porridge. [$]

Two skewers with large hunks of grilled beef glisten on a white paper plate resting on a steel counter
Anticuchos at Doña Pochita
Paola Miglio

7. Siete Sopas

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Av. Arequipa 2394
Lince 15046, Peru

Don’t be discouraged by the huge crowd in front of the Surquillo location of soup specialist Siete Sopas; the line moves quite fast. As you enter, the smell of warm bread hits you from the clay oven, and you can find many Peruvian staples on the menu including green spaghetti (pasta with pesto sauce), stuffed potatoes, roast chicken, and lomo saltado (stir-fried tenderloin). But the soups are the main attraction. Criolla and chicken soup are always on offer, along with a daily rotating option. The casual restaurant is known for its fair prices and 24/7 service, but if you go between 12 p.m. and 5 p.m. you’ll find specials ranging from braised ossobuco to short rib to duck rice. [$-$$]

A two-story interior with a spiral staircase just out of view. A large, colorful illustration covers the double-height back wall depicting a woman making soup. Families sit at four-top tables while servers prepare a long communal table in the center of th
Interior of Siete Sopas
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

8. Chifa Titi

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Javier Prado Este 1212, San Isidro
Lima, Peru

Whenever you ask a Limeño for a favorite Chifa restaurant, most will direct you to this well-established restaurant that exemplifies the Chinese influence on Peruvian cuisine. It can be difficult to pick from the sprawling menu, so go for the well-executed classics like wonton soup, chaufa pork fried rice, roasted duck, steamed fish with salted fermented beans, or Titi-style squab roasted with soy sauce, Chinese spices, and molasses. Portions are meant to be shared, so visit with a large party to enjoy a bit of everything. [$$$-$$$$]

The dark, alluring interior of Chifa Titi, with a two-top and wine glasses in the foreground, tall patterned windows, and shining, crystal-like decorations.
The interior of Chifa Titi
Courtesy of Chifa Titi

9. Malabar

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Av. Camino Real 101, San Isidro
Lima 27, Peru

Pedro Miguel Schiaffino, a Culinary Institute of America graduate, was the first chef in Peru to really explore the country's biodiversity. Open since 2004, Malabar is where he experiments with Amazonian fermentations and potatoes that grow on jungle vines. His work with indigenous communities to supply him with sustainable ingredients sets him apart. [$$$]

An edible translucent cylinder surrounds a white puff of foam and herb garnishes in a small puddle of sauce.
A dish at Malabar
Nicholas Gill

10. Astrid y Gastón

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Av. Paz Soldan 290, San Isidro
Lima, Peru

The iconic restaurant from Gastón Acurio — the renowned chef who helped popularize ceviche around the world and established Peru as a gastronomic powerhouse — just turned 25 years old. Head chef Jorge Muñoz, who used to run the kitchen at Pakta in Barcelona, has returned to Peru after almost 19 years abroad. Throughout his inventive menu he utilizes distinct northern Peruvian seasoning in dishes such as sudado (deeply savory fish stew) and ceviche that uniquely includes loche squash in the leche de tigre. At the end of the meal, guests receive a map of the country indicating where the team sourced all the produce. [$$$$]

Chefs work in the kitchen at a central island and at stations along the back walls of the restaurant kitchen
The kitchen at Astrid y Gastón
Nicholas Gill

11. Primos Chicken Bar

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Av. Los Conquistadores 201
Lima 15073, Peru

Locals often enjoy roast chicken as an affordable takeout treat on weekends, and the chicken at Primos perfectly fits the bill. It’s juicy and perfectly cooked, with thin, crispy skin. If you want to eat it as locals do, order it with Inca Kola (the national electric-yellow soda) or the corn-based beverage chicha morada. And be sure to try the salchipapas (french fries with pieces of sausage). The two locations, one in Miraflores and the other in San Isidro, offer an extensive menu with options ranging from salads to hamburgers. [$$]

A full roast chicken inside a plastic takeout container branded with the logo of the Primos restaurant
Roast chicken at Primos in Lima
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

12. Carnaval Bar

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Av. Pardo y Aliaga 662
San Isidro 15073, Peru

This is no ordinary cocktail bar. Peruvian mixologist and founder Aaron Diaz wanted to immerse people in a fine-drinking experience. Carnaval’s sophistication can be seen in his creative flair, as well as the unexpected ceramic goblets and eye-catching cocktail glasses designed for his creations. More than 20 forms of ice emerge from the impressive ice lab, which includes ice-carving machines and a water purification system that utilizes reverse osmosis. [$$-$$$]

A cocktail on the bar in a decorative, goofy skull mug, with a cinnamon stick, herbal garnish and crushed ice sticking out above the rim.
The Mule Without Nation cocktail
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

13. Osaka

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Av. Pardo y Aliaga 660, San Isidro
Lima 27, Peru

This Nikkei mainstay is where many of Lima's best known Japanese-Peruvian chefs got their start. The restaurant, now with several international locations, has transitioned away from Japan and more toward Peru in recent years, with a menu that is less sushi bar than Peruvian izakaya. It isn’t shy about using native ingredients, such as smoked aji peppers and cushuro, a spherical bacteria found in Andean lakes. [$$]

The bar, decorated with illuminated sake casks overhead, and a few tables of the dining room.
Interior of Osaka
Courtesy of Osaka

14. Cosme

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Tudela Y Varela 160-162, San Isidro
Lima, Peru

Lima has long lacked laid-back neighborhood restaurants with forward-thinking food and good cocktails, and Cosme helped fill that void. Beneath a ceiling of multicolored recycled bottles, chef James Berckemeyer pairs grilled chicken gizzards and pork belly buns with pisco drinks and house-made sodas. [$$]

Nicholas Gill

15. Mayta

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Av. Mariscal La Mar 1285
Lima 15074, Peru

Operating for a decade now, Mayta has earned its place among Lima’s classic restaurants. The restaurant’s name translates to “noble land” in Aymara, a native Andean language, and the contemporary cuisine takes inspiration from Peruvian heritage and traditional flavors. Many things on Jaime Pesaque’s menu are worth trying, such as his star dish — duck rice with smoked magret, fried duck egg, and foie gras — or Amazonian ceviche with ginger, cilantro, charapita chile, and sweet plantains. Beware of the incredible pisco bar. This is the place to try a chilcano, a Peruvian cocktail made out of pisco, ginger ale, and lemon. To craft a special chilcano, choose from more than 120 seasonal piscos macerated with a rotating list of fruits, herbs, vegetables, dried fruits, and nuts. [$$$]

A bar in the center of the dining room at Mayta, with dark mood lighting, industrial steel see-through shelves above the bar, rows of illuminated bar stools along the closest side, and rows of illuminated bottles visible behind the bar.
Interior of Mayta restaurant in Lima
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

16. El Mercado

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Hipólito Unanue 203, Miraflores
Lima 18, Peru

Rafael Osterling’s consistent quality makes his lunchtime-only cevicheria and Peruvian seafood restaurant a favorite in Lima. As you walk into the semi-open patio, the pleasant atmosphere makes you want to stay the whole afternoon. That’s plenty of time to sample the extensive menu, but start with a ceviche or tiradito combined with the must-have Parmesan scallops, followed by the chicharron sandwich. A pisco sour makes a sure pairing to any order. [$$$]

Outdoor seating beneath an awning, with guests seated at low tables in patio chairs, a bar off to one side, and a large young tree in the middle of the space.
The patio at El Mercado
Nicholas Gill

17. El Pan de la Chola

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Av. La Mar 918, Miraflores
Lima 18, Peru

One of Lima’s favorite bread and pastry shops, Pan de la Chola is housed in a lofty space with floor-to-ceiling windows. There, Jonathan Day distinguishes his artisanal breads with a strong commitment to craft, the best ingredients, and respect for natural fermentation. A blackboard menu touts rustic loaves, focaccia, sandwiches, cookies, vegetable and fruit juices blended to order, specialty coffee, and the must-have avocado toast. [$$]

Loaves of bread sit a cafe counter with a hand-written sign bearing prices.
Breads at El Pan de la Chola
Nicholas Gill

18. Sutorīto Māketto

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Av. Mariscal La Mar 830
Miraflores 15074, Peru

This new, casual Miraflores spot by Javier Miyasato showcases the chef’s playful approach to Nikkei cuisine, partly inspired by memories of favorite dishes from his childhood. The restaurant is exceedingly fun, with a vibrant space that takes inspiration from the streets of Lima and walls full of colorful graffiti. Don’t expect subtle dishes. Miyasato infuses intense flavors into his nigiri, maki, and sashimi, mixing sweet and spicy flavors in combinations like crab cream, parmesan, and tare. Among his richest dishes are a glazed pork rib with Thai shoyu, fried garlic, and chile pepper, and a short rib sandwich with seaweed, cheddar, caramelized kimchi, and Sriracha mayonnaise.

A long dish with pieces of cured fish lying in ponzu and sesame oil sauce, arranged beneath garnishes of Japanese cucumber and slices of limo chile pepper
Cured fish with ponzu, Japanese cucumber, limo chile, and sesame oil
Sutorīto Māketto

19. Matria

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Calle Gral Mendiburu 823
Miraflores 15074, Peru

Chef Arlette Eulert’s restaurant boasts Peruvian and organic ingredients that change according to the seasons, and her menu is one of few in town to specify dishes that are gluten or lactose free, vegan, or vegetarian. The chef puts spins on classic dishes like tiradito — adding popped quinoa for crunchiness and salsa-like chalaquita with roe — and she loves to mix Indian and Thai spices into dishes like grilled scallops with curry or the catch of the day in a sauce of coconut milk and yellow curry. Leave space for dessert and order the shareable alfajor (layers of cookies and dulce de leche, locally called manjar blanco). You won’t regret it. [$$$]

The dining room of Matria with round two-top tables and minimalist chairs, a back-lit round mirror against one wall in a darkened alcove, light streaming in from tinted skylights in another main area that also features a plant wall with rows of vines emer
Interior of Matria in Lima
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

20. Al Toke Pez

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Av. Angamos Este 886, Surquillo
Lima 34, Peru

This hole in the wall in the Surquillo district used to be a hidden gem, but chef Tomas Matsufuji’s skills are now well known. The small counter only sits eight to 10 people and only at lunch, but for a surprisingly fair price guests enjoy abundant flavor. Matsufuji’s combinado includes ceviche, deep-fried calamari, and seafood rice, and lucky diners may also find daily specials. If you want to wash it down with beer, bring your own, because the chef only offers chicha morada, a traditional corn beverage that pairs well with his food. Don’t leave without drinking the leche de tigre, concocted to be both delicious and restorative for hangovers. [$-$$]

A dish at Al Toke Pez
Nicholas Gill

21. La Mar Cebichería

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Av. La Mar 770, Miraflores
Lima 18, Peru

La Mar is one of Gastón Acurio’s flagship restaurants. It has launched franchises abroad and is partly responsible for earning Peruvian cuisine its global reputation, but if you head to the Miraflores location, prepare your appetite for a seafood feast. It’s fun to begin with the raw bar, where ceviches are carefully prepared with the daily catch, alongside tiraditos, nigiri, and maki. Generously portioned dishes from the kitchen might consist of grouper head in a Nikkei curry sauce, whole salt-roasted sea bass with ginger scallions and butter, or noodles in a creamy huancaina (cheesy pepper) sauce with crab and shrimp. [$$$]

A bowl of bright, studded with large chunks of fish and garnished with a sprig of herbs, sits on an outdoor table beside a patio chair.
Sea bass ceviche
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

22. Mo Bistro

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Angamos Oeste 1146 Miraflores
Lima 15073, Peru

Most people go to Mo Bistro for breakfast or brunch when the restaurant serves waffles made with camote (sweet potato), sandwiches, sweet pastries, and great coffee, but the upscale dinner menu is worth a try too. Seasonal and local produce dictate the rhythms of chef Matías Cilloniz’s exquisite, vegetable-driven menu, with options like grilled avocado in tucupi broth (the liquid extracted from an Amazonian cassava), lentil stew with sachatomate (tamarillo or tree tomato), and roasted leek with chestnuts and masato sauce made from yuca. But Cilloniz also loves serving intriguing offal dishes like brain croquetas or tongue pastrami on toast. [$$-$$$]

From above, an artistically-presented tomato salad dish with various herbs and garnishes, geometrically sequestered to one edge of a round dish.
Tomato salad with tamarillo vinaigrette
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

23. Statera

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Lima, Av. Mariscal La Mar 463
Miraflores 15074, Peru

André Patsias forged his career through fine dining restaurants such as Noma in Denmark, Quique Dacosta in Spain, and Astrid y Gastón and Central in Peru until 2018, when he decided to venture out on his own. At Statera, he serves sophisticated, contemporary dishes showcasing Peruvian ingredients such as sweetbreads with arracacha (Andean tuber) and coffee nectar, or cactus sorbet with chile cream and razor clams. Building on the aesthetic he developed at Central, Patsias also focuses on avant garde presentation in each dish. The dining room is equally beautiful, combining modern concrete walls with warm wood and greenery.

An otherworldly dish composed of granita-like sorbet garnished with various seaweed-like toppings and star-shaped accents on an ashy base.
Cactus sorbet with chile cream and razor clams
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

24. La Picantería

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Calle Santa Rosa 388, Surquillo
Lima, Peru

Picanterias, humble restaurants often run by women in small Peruvian towns, especially in the northern Arequipa and Cusco, inspired chef-owner Héctor Solís to open his restaurant in the middle-class Surquillo suburb, where he serves only the highest-quality fish. The dining room features long wooden tables to be shared among guests and an open counter where the chef displays fresh catches in huge ice buckets. Choose your fish and your preferred seasoning style, and order some white rice to soak up any juices left over on the plate. The menu also includes ceviches, causas (potato casseroles), stuffed rocotos (red hot Peruvian peppers), and parihuela (seafood soup). [$$$]

A full, skin-on fish is served in a large baking dish nearly filled with broth dotted with large chunks of vegetables.
Whole fish served at La Picanteria
Nicholas Gill

25. Costanera 700

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Av. Del Ejército 421, Miraflores
Lima 18, Peru

You don’t come to Costanera 700 for the atmosphere or the buzz, which is minimal, perhaps due to chef Yaquir Sato’s introversion. You come for the food. Dishes at the pioneer of traditional Nikkei cuisine aren’t overly complicated, just well executed and very tasty. Sato’s extensive menu features classic dishes such as causa (potato casserole) with crab, fish ceviche, or sumptuous duck rice. The precise minimalism of the conchas de abanico (scallops) and the house-made pasta are worth a visit alone. [$$$]

A fish is cut and splayed on a serving dish with a small bowl of dipping sauce nearby
Fish at Costanera 700
Nicholas Gill

26. Neira Café Lab

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Calle Enrique Palacios 1074
Miraflores 15074, Peru

Peru is slowly gaining global attention for its coffee, and nowhere is that more evident than Harry Neira’s cafe. Neira, who won the National Barista Championship in 2014, travels across the country sourcing specialty beans from different regions. At his cozy coffeehouse in the Miraflores district, he determines the optimal roast for each variety and offers to brew them according to guests’ preferences. [$-$$]

A marble counter with jars of preserves and bags of coffee displayed in the foreground, an espresso maker at the far end of the bar, a barista preparing food behind the bar, and customizable letter board listing menu items on the back wall.
Interior of Neira Café Lab
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

27. Mercado 1 Surquillo

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Av. Paseo de la República 5295
Cercado de Lima 15074, Peru

Limeños usually go to their nearest local market, but if you’re looking to visit one, go to Mercado No. 1 Surquillo, the best organized in the city. Discover Peruvian produce, seafood, herbs, and local fruits like cherimoya, lucuma, and granadilla. Luciano Pachas opened the popular El Cevichano stall in 2014 and has expanded three times since in order to accommodate throngs of guests coming to taste his ceviche. Go for the mixto with chicharrón (fried calamari), one of the most popular dishes. [$-$$]

Customers sit at a counter beneath an illustrated sign bearing the name of the El Cevichano stall, while chefs hand diners plates from the kitchen.
The counter at El Cevichano in Mercado 1 Surquillo
Courtesy of El Cevichano

28. Rafael Restaurant

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San Martín 300, Miraflores
Lima 18, Peru

This much-loved restaurant keeps getting better after 18 years of operation, and you’ll often find it packed even on Monday nights. That success is based on a combination of lively ambience and incredibly pleasurable dishes. Chef-owner Rafael Osterling imbues dishes with inspiration from his worldly travels while celebrating Peruvian flavors and produce. Meanwhile, head chef Rodrigo Alzamora gets credit for exacting technique and quality ingredients. The menu offers subtlety in the crab ravioli, lavishness in the spaghetti with duck, and excitement in the tuna tiradito, the grilled scallops with lemon butter, and the sea urchin rice with leche de tigre. Be sure to stop by the bar for a pre-dinner cocktail too. [$$$$]

An exterior shot of the Rafael restaurant, a dusty, one-story, red building sitting on a street corner with small bushes and more plants lining the edge of the roof.
The exterior of Rafael
Nicholas Gill

29. Maido

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Ca. San Martín 399, Miraflores
Lima 18, Peru

At Maido, chef Mitsuharu Tsumura is known for bringing Peruvian-Japanese Nikkei cuisine to the next level. Although you can order a la carte, choose the tasting menu showcasing the wonders of two lands, including the rich flavors of a northern dish like sudado stew with algae and the more subtle notes of scallop and sea urchin sushi. In the last few years, Tsumura has been introducing more native ingredients, such as ollucos (an Andean tuber), native potatoes, macambo seed (a nut from the cacao family), and huacatay (an aromatic herb), among others. Book your reservation at least a month in advance. The restaurant has received many accolades and a spot in the top 10 on the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list. [$$$$]

A dish at Maido
Nicholas Gill

30. Amaz Restaurante

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Av. La Paz 1079, Miraflores
Lima 18, Peru

Chef Pedro Miguel Schiaffino is known for bringing the Amazonian pantry and culture to the contemporary Peruvian culinary scene, especially at fine dining restaurant Malabar. At Amaz, Schiaffino presents a more casual side while promoting relatively unknown produce from one of the most biodiverse regions in the world. Try the heart of palm salad, a delicacy with toasted cassava flour, chestnuts, and sacha inchi (a seed also called Inca peanut). Or go for the titoté juane, chicken and coconut rice wrapped and cooked in banana leaf. [$$-$$$]

A counter with a bevy of pendant lights hanging at various heights overhead, bar shelves visible to one side, a small statue of a jaguar and colorful jungle bird on the floor nearby, and a creeping vine plant wall visible in the background.
The interior of Amaz, with design inspired by the natural Amazonian environment
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

31. Mercado 28

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Av Vasco Núñez de Balboa 755
Miraflores 15074, Peru

With 18 vendors serving local and global cuisines, this market presents a great opportunity to sample a huge range of foods under one roof. At Provinciano, order traditional Peruvian dishes such as flavor-packed lomo saltado (sautéed filet mignon with tomatoes, onions, and french fries) or causa limeña (potato casserole with chicken, avocado, boiled egg, and tomato). La Patarashkita features Amazonian delicacies like cocoa-smoked ribs and paiche skewers (arapaima fish) with green fried plantains. Mitsuharu Tsumura’s fast-food chain Sushi Pop serves a variety of sushi, pokes, and sandwiches. And at Blu, native ingredients like cherimoya, aguaymanto (cape gooseberry), and muña (Andean mint) are converted into scoops of creamy gelato and sorbet. [$-$$]

A large industrial, hangar-like space with light flooding in through the roof and upper wall panels, with flags hanging on lines criss-crossing the air above diners seated at tables and food stalls in the background.
Market stalls and diners at Mercado 28
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

32. Isolina

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Av San Martin 101
Lima 15063, Peru

In a converted home from the 1900s in the bohemian neighborhood of Barranco, Isolina recreates an old tavern where Limeños can refuel with nostalgia. Chef Jose del Castillo recovers recipes from his mother and grandmother while revamping the traditional cuisine of Lima. Expect hearty preparations like cau cau (tripe and potato stew with blood sausage) and chicken sweetbread stew, as well as lighter starters like ceviche or pejerrey (a small fish) sandwich. Most of the dishes are meant to be shared, so bring your friends. [$$-$$$]

Dishes spread out on a wooden table bathed in natural light
A spread of dishes at Isolina
Nicholas Gill

33. Siete

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Jirón Domeyer 260
Barranco 15063, Peru

Whether you’re just looking to drink a cocktail or you’d prefer a sit-down dinner, you are guaranteed a good time at Siete. A hip crowd fills this cozy and entertaining Barranco bistro where Ricardo Martins commands the back of house. His style relies on quality produce, minimal ingredients, and a free hand, resulting in rich and unique flavors. Take for instance his razor clams with chickpeas cooked in chicha de jora (a traditional Andean fermented drink), the fork-tender angus short rib, or the fish with curry sauce, yellow Peruvian chile, and sweet plantain. [$$-$$$]

A bowl of smelt in sauce is accompanied by a bread board with slices of avocado and tomato sauce
Smelt, avocado, alioli and tomato sauce
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

34. Pan Sal Aire

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Av. Almte. Miguel Grau 320, Lima
Barranco 15063, Peru

With its colorful floor tiles and wooden shutters on the windows, Pan Sal Aire is a charming addition to Lima’s artsy Barranco neighborhood. Shakshuka, avocado toast, and BLTs are served at breakfast, along with a large variety of house-made pastries such as cinnamon rolls, vanilla cookies, and carrot cake. Salads, pastas, and wood-fired pizzas are available at lunch and dinner. To start, order the eatery’s claim to fame, toasts topped with options like trout gravlax or watercress with honey, pear, and almonds. [$$]

A ham and cheese sandwich cut in half and stacked with sliced edges facing the camera,  with thick smears of cheese on the cut sides
Ham and cheese sandwich
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

35. Mérito

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Jr, 28 De Julio 206
Barranco 15063, Peru

One of the latest Barranco district restaurants, Mérito is commanded by two Venezuelan chefs who pay tribute to their roots using the Peruvian pantry in innovative ways. Try to get a seat at the kitchen counter where you can watch them craft sophisticated dishes like yucca quesadillas with mashuas (an Andean tuber), or scallops with ñame (yam) and barbecued sachatomate (tamarillo). For dessert, ask for the crema volteada (similar to creme caramel) or the seared cherimoya when it’s in season. Bear in mind the restaurant doesn’t take reservations. [$$$]

A fish artistically garnished with a row of herbs sits beside a bowl filled with fresh, puffy arepas
Catch of the day with arepas
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

36. Sibaris Resto Bar

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28 De Julio 206
Distrito de Barranco 15063, Peru

This cozy Barranco restobar draws a young crowd with local craft beers, house cocktails, and eclectic cuisine ideal for snacking. Look out for dishes like lentils with caramelized pork and fried bananas or beef tartare with crunchy bread. The pizzas are thin as flatbread and help soak up the booze. [$$]

An exterior shot of the entryway to Sibaris, with wooden French doors splayed open.
Outside Sibaris
Courtesy of Sibaris

37. Kjolle

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Av. Pedro de Osma 301
Barranco 15063, Peru

In August 2018, Central co-chef Pia León opened her own restaurant upstairs. Although more relaxed than Central, Kjolle’s price and León’s focused, precise cooking still qualify as a fine-dining experience not to be missed. The chef treats Peruvian ingredients with modern techniques and forward-looking sensitivity. An a la carte menu is available, but go for the tasting menu to sample León’s cool, sophisticated dishes like sea bass and razor clams with black mashwa (Andean tuber) and Amazonian nuts, or cured duck with squid and kañiwa (Andean cereal), all served in beautiful tableware. [$$$$]

Ribbons of yucca, olluco (Andean tuber), and potato are layered in a decorative presentation
Yucca, olluco, and potato
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

38. Central Restaurante

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Av. Pedro de Osma 301 Lima
Barranco 15063, Peru

Virgilio Martínez, along with his wife, Pia León, and sister Malena Martínez, created an impressive complex that houses restaurants Central and Kjolle, the experimental Mater Iniciativa (an innovation lab where cooks develop new techniques and recipes), and cocktail bar Mayo. The avant-garde tasting menu at Central showcases Peruvian produce from different altitudes, and you should expect to stumble through many unfamiliar ingredients. Every flavorful bite is a piece of art, revealing thorough preparation behind this unique experience. Central is a regular at the top of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list, making it a challenge to snag reservations, which open every three months. [$$$$]

Colorful squares of an ultra modern desert sit on an equally colorful plate
“Coastal desert” (cactus and yuyo)
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

1. El Chinito

Jr. Chancay 894, Cercado de Lima, Lima 1, Peru
A server in a branded apron and chef’s toque lifts the top bun of a sandwich while using tongs to add ingredients.
A server prepares a sandwich
Nicholas Gill

Sánguches (sandwiches) are an important part of Peruvian culture and usually enjoyed at breakfast, although you can enjoy them at any time. Chinese immigrant Félix Yong opened this traditional sangucheria in 1960 in Lima’s historic center. The signature sandwich is the chicharrón: a French baguette filled with fried pork that’s both crunchy and juicy, topped with sweet potato, yellow-pepper sauce, salsa criolla (onion, lime, rocoto pepper, parsley), and pickled purple onions. There is usually a line if you arrive before midday, but it moves fast. [$-$$]

Jr. Chancay 894, Cercado de Lima
Lima 1, Peru

2. Osso

Tahiti 175, Lima 15026, Peru
A thick hunk of marbled meat grills directly on a coal fire
Osso’s grill at work
Nicholas Gill

Vegetarians, look away; this place is meant for meat lovers. Renzo Garibaldi started Osso as a butcher shop in the upscale suburb of La Molina and has since expanded with a full restaurant, as well as a franchise in the San Isidro district. Head to the La Molina restaurant and grab one of the 12 seats at Garibaldi’s tasting-menu-only butcher’s table. The feast begins with house-made charcuterie, followed by tartare, hot dogs, sliders, and grilled cuts in various dry-age stages, all showcasing the chef’s skills and profound knowledge of both meat and fire. And dessert? You can expect bacon to feature. [$$$-$$$$]

Tahiti 175
Lima 15026, Peru

3. Don Fernando Restaurante

Av. Gral. Eugenio Garzón 1788, Jesús María 15072, Peru
Slices of raw sole sit on a dish in a bath of olive oil, topped with minced onion and garlic, and garnished with a sprig of herbs.
Sole tiradito with olive oil, onion and garlic
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

Every day, two brothers alternate as cook and floor manager at this institution of traditional northern Peruvian cuisine. The restaurant has been in operation for 27 years, but the humble dining room still gets packed at lunch from Tuesday to Sunday, with diners seated around a fig tree in the middle of the room. Garlic, onion, chile, tomato, and lemon star in the brothers’ energetic seasoning, and Don Fernando is especially known for hearty stews, as well as seafood and fish dishes like ceviches. If you order the fresh clams (only served on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays), the server will likely advise you, “If they don’t move, return them.” [$$$]

Av. Gral. Eugenio Garzón 1788
Jesús María 15072, Peru

4. Antigua Taberna Queirolo

Av. San Martin 1090, Pueblo Libre, Lima Lima 21, Peru
A sandwich, sliced down the middle and overflowing with pork and red onions, fills a plate that sits alone on a bar.
Sandwich with jamón de la casa
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

This quintessential restaurant, located on a corner in the working-class neighborhood of Pueblo Libre, was founded in 1880 as a grocery store and winery. Taberna Queirolo serves traditional Peruvian dishes, such as cau cau (cow tripe stew), aji de gallina (chicken stew with aji peppers), corn tamales, and pork sandwiches. Order a ruleta, a shareable appetizer plate that features small portions of three to four classic recipes. And if you really want to eat like the locals, get a res, a tray that comes with a bottle of pisco, a liter of ginger ale, limes, sugar, and sour cherry syrup so you can prepare chilcano cocktails for yourself. [$$]

Av. San Martin 1090, Pueblo Libre
Lima Lima 21, Peru

5. La Picante

Av. Húsares de Junin 651, Jesús María 15072, Peru
A shot from above of a skilled with a large hunk of roasted pork, rice, vegetables, and a large mound of bright sliced cabbage in the center.
Pork rice
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

Tucked away in the Jesús María district far from the usual gastronomic areas, this casual and colorful restaurant run by Fransua Robles specializes in traditional Peruvian staples, with an emphasis on the raw bar. The kitchen sources fresh market produce daily. If it’s in season, order the sea urchin ceviche, and don’t miss the popular clams with lemon or the chef’s homey rice dishes. [$$]

Av. Húsares de Junin 651
Jesús María 15072, Peru

6. Anticuchería Doña Pochita

Av. Ignacio Merino 2316, Lince 15046, Peru
Two skewers with large hunks of grilled beef glisten on a white paper plate resting on a steel counter
Anticuchos at Doña Pochita
Paola Miglio

On a busy street of the Lince neighborhood, a line of people wait to eat anticuchos (beef skewers) from Doña Pochita’s little street cart, which opens every day from 5 p.m. until midnight. Pochita has laid claim to this corner for more than 20 years. She grills beef heart marinated with panca chile, vinegar, garlic, cumin, salt, and pepper, and serves the skewers with slices of potatoes and chile sauce. The cart also offers tripe, sweetbreads, chicken hearts and breast, and for dessert, picarones and rice pudding with purple porridge. [$]

Av. Ignacio Merino 2316
Lince 15046, Peru

7. Siete Sopas

Av. Arequipa 2394, Lince 15046, Peru
A two-story interior with a spiral staircase just out of view. A large, colorful illustration covers the double-height back wall depicting a woman making soup. Families sit at four-top tables while servers prepare a long communal table in the center of th
Interior of Siete Sopas
Liliana Lopez Sorzano

Don’t be discouraged by the huge crowd in front of the Surquillo location of soup specialist Siete Sopas; the line moves quite fast. As you enter, the smell of warm bread hits you from the clay oven, and you can find many Peruvian staples on the menu including green spaghetti (pasta with pesto sauce), stuffed potatoes, roast chicken, and lomo saltado (stir-fried tenderloin). But the soups are the main attraction. Criolla and chicken soup are always on offer, along with a daily rotating option. The casual restaurant is known for its fair prices and 24/7 service, but if you go between 12 p.m. and 5 p.m. you’ll find specials ranging from braised ossobuco to short rib to duck rice. [$-$$]

Av. Arequipa 2394
Lince 15046, Peru

8. Chifa Titi

Javier Prado Este 1212, San Isidro, Lima, Peru