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Sham shui Po in Hong Kong
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The 38 Essential Hong Kong Restaurants

Where to find wonton noodles, Cantonese-style goose, comforting congee, and life-changing yakitori in the thrilling harbor city 

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Sham shui Po in Hong Kong
| Photo by Getty Images

It is quite possible to get an overview of Hong Kong's history and culture by eating your way through this metropolis. We may not be proud of the fact that the city now imports 97 percent of its food, but it is also a testament to Hong Kong's incredible ascent as one of the world's largest trading centers.

A mere 180 years ago, this cluster of islands consisted of tiny fishing villages, but being an international port has made "East‐meets‐West" much more than empty PR speak. Street food and food court culture is fast disappearing as a result of out‐of‐touch food licensing laws and a lack of interest in the grittier end of the industry. To eat like a Hongkonger on a daily basis, though, still means to eat one of the most vital regional Chinese cuisines, Cantonese; noodle dishes that speak to the city's halieutic past; hybrid diner‐style foods that feature the first imported British and American ingredients, including macaroni and canned evaporated milk; adopted colonial meals like afternoon tea; and today's new‐gen Chinese cooking and internationally recognized fine dining.

Price key:
$ = Less than HK $150 (19 USD)
$$ = HK $151 - 400 (20 - 51 USD)
$$$ = HK $401 - 700 (52 - 90 USD)
$$$$ HK $701 (91 USD) and up

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Hoover Cake Shop 豪華餅店

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136 Nga Tsin Wai Rd
Kowloon City, Hong Kong
+852 2382 0383
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Egg tarts — little tarts with a pie crust or flaky pastry base filled with a delicate egg custard — are a Hong Kong staple, and Hoover makes one of the best. Despite the shop being in a run‐down neighborhood, don’t be surprised to see white‐gloved chauffeurs pulling up to pile boxes into fancy cars. [$]

Hoover Cake Shop / Official

2. Chiu Chow Hop Shing Dessert

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2383 3026

This fourth-generation dessert spot specializes in sweets from Chiu Chow (also known as Teochew or Chaozhou), a region in far eastern Guangdong with its own distinct culture — and desserts such as lotus seeds cooked in light syrup, served with a hard-boiled egg. This late-night favorite also serves a huge range of modern creations, like vanilla sundaes with black glutinous rice and mango jelly with evaporated milk. [$]

3. Islam Food

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Hong Kong, Kowloon City
Lung Kong Rd, 地下及閣樓

Hong Kong boasts a considerable Muslim population from China, Indonesia, Pakistan and beyond, and with them comes plenty of opportunities to savor the hearty halal Chinese dishes, which takes inspiration from Xinjiang cuisine, known for its love of spice. There’s at least one platter of veal goulash pockets on every table — you won’t go wrong by following suit. [$-$$]

Pan fried beef bun at Islam Food
Islam Food

4. Mui Kee at Fa Yuen Street Market 花園街街市

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Shop11-12, 4/F, Fa Yuen Street Municipal Services Bldg, 123A Fa Yuen St
Mong Kok, Hong Kong

Congee, the porridge made from rice and water (or stock), is comfort food for Hongkongers, and it makes for a hearty breakfast or a light lunch. Mui Kee’s fish stock congee continuously draws people to the food court on the top floor of a municipal market. Choose your own additions — anything from fresh fish slices to pig’s liver— and slurp it up, perhaps with an iced lemon tea on the side. [$]

5. TAP The Ale Project

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G/F, 15 Hak Po Street
Mong Kok, Hong Kong
+852 2468 2010
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Hong Kong has its share of craft breweries, and craft beer bars have popped up all over town. Few are as serious as TAP, however, where draft and bottle offerings are on constant rotation with both local and international brews, and the staff have a real passion for beer. The food is no afterthought, either, with excellent bar bites like a Cubano made with siu yuk (Cantonese crispy roast pork). [$$]

TAP / Official

6. Woodlands Indian Vegetarian Restaurant 活蘭印度素食

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Tsim Sha Tsui Wing On Plaza UG16-17 62 Mody Road |, P1, MTR exit
Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong

Tsim Sha Tsui is known as a hub for Hong Kong’s Indian community, so it’s little surprise that the city’s oldest Indian vegetarian restaurant is here. Woodlands is a predominantly South Indian restaurant, meaning dosas are the name of the game, and spice fiends have been digging into these massive, crispy pancakes for almost 40 years. [$$]

7. Peking Garden Restaurant 北京樓

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Hong Kong, Tsim Sha Tsui
HK 九龍 尖沙咀 尖沙咀星光行3樓 3/F., Star House

For decades, local families have been celebrating with Peking Garden’s duck, beggar’s chicken (chicken baked in a pastry casing), and noodles pulled tableside. While no one minded the ’80s decor, the recent freshening up was a welcome change, making it an even better place to take in the views of Victoria Harbour, and for the right price too. [$$]

Peking duck at Peking Garden
Maxim’s Chinese Cuisine

8. Yan Toh Heen

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Yan Toh Heen, Lower Level, InterContinental Hong Kong, 18 Salisbury Road
Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong

The most iconic postcard view of Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbor is best seen from Kowloon, and Yan Toh Heen’s sea-level, harborside setting offers front-row views. Although the hotel is due to be renovated this year, its flagship Chinese restaurant got its facelift a little earlier, which ensures that the well-loved restaurant remains open during the hotel’s temporary closure. Chef Yiu-fai Lau has been with the hotel since it opened, and continues to please with meticulously made Cantonese classics, such as dim sum, as well as Chinese favorites like Peking duck. [$$$]

9. Hoi On Cafe 海安㗎啡室

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17 Connaught Rd W
Sheung Wan, Hong Kong
+852 2540 6340

Locals love cha chaan teng food, a uniquely Hong Kong cuisine that mostly consists of pseudo‐Western concoctions like macaroni with ham in soup; deep‐fried peanut butter sandwiches known as “French” toast; and sweetened condensed milk poured over red bean paste and a compressed ball of shaved ice, a concoction that's halfway between a dessert and a beverage. Hoi On was once the cha chaan teng of choice for sailors docking at the nearby ports. Several years ago the owner’s daughter gave the place a good scrub, and, to bring back its former glory, hired new staff — including bakers to make their famous coconut tarts. [$]

Hoi On Cafe / Official

10. Yardbird

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154-158 Wing Lok St
Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

Yardbird was the first restaurant opened by Matt Abergel (a Masa alum) and Lindsay Jang, and they’ve since become legends in Hong Kong’s notoriously finicky restaurant scene. Their restaurant is almost five years old, and it’s still one of the hottest spots in town. Yakitori is the name of the game. Every part of the chicken is served, from skewers of hearts to crispy skin on rice. There are no reservations; queuing is part of the experience. And be sure to have a drink — the Japanese‐influenced beverage program is one of a kind. [$$$$]

Skewers at Yardbird
Yardbird/Facebook

11. Sushi Saito

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Hong Kong, 45th floor, 8號 Finance St
Central, Hong Kong

Takashi Saito’s three-Michelin-starred sushiya in Tokyo is one of the most highly sought-after tables among globetrotting gourmands. His only overseas outlet (for now) is in Hong Kong, and is helmed by Ikuya Kobayashi, who works with ingredients handpicked by Saito and flown in daily. A seat is hard to score, but it’s worth the effort for what is possibly the best sushi in town. [$$$$]

12. The Lounge at the Four Seasons Hotel Hong Kong

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3196 8888

Hong Kong may no longer be under British rule, but the tradition of afternoon tea is still going strong. For an all-frills experience, the Lounge at Four Seasons Hong Kong is hard to beat, complete with floor-to-ceiling harbor views, a classic three-tiered presentation, plus additional dishes passed around throughout tea time. [$$$]

The Lounge at the Four Seasons
Four Seasons

13. Chan Kan Kee Chiu Chow 陳勤記鹵鵝飯店

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11 Queen's Rd W
Sheung Wan, Hong Kong
+852 2858 0033

The city of Chaozhou (still more commonly known by its old name, Chiu Chow) is officially part of Guangdong (Canton), but is culturally distinct: Chiu Chow people speak their own dialect and have their own distinctive foods. Chan Kan Kee is a specialist in lo shui, in which foods like goose, tofu, and eggs are poached in a liquid mostly flavored with soy sauce and five spice. [$$]

14. Okra

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110號 Queen's Rd W
Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong

Originally from New Orleans, Max Levy became interested in Japanese cuisine when he realized it had a lot in common with what he grew up eating — fish and rice. Although Japanese in principle, Levy’s food has been heavily influenced by China, where he’s been based since 2004 (first in Beijing, then Hong Kong). Housed in a narrow walk-up a stone’s throw from the city’s famous dried herb and seafood markets, Okra features two floors of Levy’s cooking: izakaya-style dining downstairs, and a reservations-only sushi bar upstairs. In both spots, expect Chinese- and Japanese-inspired flavors with a novel spin. Think: aged pigeon marinated in sake, served with Crystal hot sauce — because Louisiana. [$$-$$$$]

Blackfin tuna at Okra
OKRA/Facebook

15. Mak's Noodles (Chung Kee) 麥奀記(忠記)

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37 Wing Kut St
Sheung Wan, Hong Kong
+852 2541 6388

A street vendor from Guangzhou named Mak Woon‐chi is often called the inventor of wonton noodles (prawn dumplings with thin wheat noodles, served in a pork‐based broth), and the Mak family name is almost synonymous with the iconic dish. As a result, there are more than a few shops named Mak’s around town. Hit this inconspicuous Mak’s (also called Chung Kee) tucked away on Wing Kut Street. It was opened by one of Mak Woon‐chi’s grandsons. Many shops add pork to their wontons, but Mak’s dumplings contain only prawns, which was apparently what Mak Sr. intended. [$]

Janice Leung Hayes

16. Coco Espresso

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19 Jervois St
Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

Johnson Ko started CoCo Espresso in Sheung Wan back in 2008, when the area was better known for its temples and cheap lunch spots, and a properly pulled espresso was scarcer than hen’s teeth. Having learned his craft in Australia, he was instrumental in introducing the now-ubiquitous Antipodean style to the city, and he now has several cafes dotted all over town, including a brand-new roastery. CoCo Espresso’s new flagship is a glorious, airy space that screams “lifestyle” — a far cry from the utilitarian space where it began — but staying true to its roots, it’s just a few steps away from the original shop. [$]

Coco Espresso
Coco Espresso

17. For Kee Restaurant 科記咖啡餐室

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Shop J-K, 200 Hollywood Rd, Sheung Wan
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
+852 2546 8947

Before Starbucks took over the city’s streets, the local caffeine fix of choice was Hong Kong‐style milk tea, a strong Ceylon tea served with unsweetened evaporated milk. Most people got their milk tea from their neighborhood cha chaan teng, or diner. Now, fanatics cross town for For Kee’s milk tea — though many also stick around for the pan‐fried pork chop, marinated in soy sauce and sugar, and served with your choice of rice, noodles, or a hamburger bun. [$]

18. VEA Restaurant & Lounge

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29 & 30/F, 198 Wellington Street
Central, Hong Kong

VEA stands for “Vicky e Antonio”, both homegrown stars of the F&B scene. Vicky Cheng wows with his newfound “Chinese x French” cuisine, where he recreates classic Chinese combinations like razor clams with garlic, fermented black beans, and spring onion using French techniques that he learned at places like Daniel in New York. The restaurant serves tasting menus only, and you can pair Cheng’s food with multi-award-winning bartender Antonio Lai’s cocktails. [$$$$]

A dish at VEA
VEA Restaurant/Facebook

19. Beet

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6 Kau U Fong
Central, Hong Kong

With the revival of local agriculture, Hong Kong’s chefs are slowly waking up to the possibilities of farm-to-table cuisine. Beet has quickly become a staple in this town thanks to chef Barry Quek’s vision for using mostly local produce. He cut his teeth in some of the world’s best kitchens, including Attica in Melbourne and De Wulf in Belgium, whose inspiration can be found in his fresh, modern European plates that are, in fact, truly local in their provenance. Expect everything from well-loved Chinese herbs such as garlic shoots and marigolds to locally raised chicken. [$$-$$$]

Crispy potato roll with smoked potato purée
Beet Restaurant/Facebook

20. The Chairman 大班樓

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18 Kau U Fong, Central
Central and Western District, Hong Kong
+852 2555 2202
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It might sometimes be labeled a “locavore” Cantonese restaurant, but the Chairman isn’t so much about seasonality as it is about finding fresh ingredients that best represent the region and delivering them to your dinner table, stat. The steamed flower crab (a variety native to nearby waters) dressed with rice wine and chicken fat — with wide ribbons of rice noodles underneath to soak up the sauce — is the stuff of dreams. [$$$]

The Chairman / Official

21. Teakha 茶.家

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18 Tai Ping Shan St
Sheung Wan, Hong Kong
+852 2858 9185
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For a little oasis of calm in this frenetic city, head to Teakha. Rustic scones, cakes, and teas from all over Asia are served in an elegant, quiet corner, and you’re encouraged to sit back and let the stress melt away. On weekends, hipsters descend on the area, and it can be hard to get a seat indoors, but don’t let that kill your slow-life vibes — get your snacks to go and sit on the street, or in the little park around the corner. [$]

Facebook.com / teakhaHK

22. Neighborhood

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61-63 Hollywood Rd
Sheung Wan, Hong Kong
+852 2617 0891
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Chef David Lai is no stranger to local restaurant hounds, loved by local dining obsessives for bucking food trends and simply serving what he thinks is delicious. The French Laundry alum was one of the first chefs cooking non‐Chinese to shop daily at the city’s “wet” markets (fresh food markets). The menu changes weekly, and features whatever’s in season — be it local, from Japan, or from the south of France. It might be Japanese firefly squid one week, and local lobster the next, always cooked simply with a slight French accent. [$$$]

Neighborhood / Official

23. Ser Wong Fun 蛇王芬

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30 Cochrane St
Central, Hong Kong
2543 1032

In traditional Chinese medicine, eating snake is believed to keep you warm. In the winter, eating snake soup is a must for many, and one of the most famous places to do so is at Ser Wong Fun (it literally translates to Fun the Snake King), which has been around for over a century. It’s said that its soup recipe was passed down from the original inventor of the dish. But snake isn’t the only thing this place is known for — people also come for the vast array of hearty Cantonese classics, such as preserved sausages in claypot rice, pan-fried fish cakes with clam sauce, and stir-fried prawns in soy sauce. [$-$$]

24. Luk Yu Tea House 陸羽茶室

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G/F-3/F, 24-26 Stanley St, Central
Central and Western District, Hong Kong
+852 2523 5464

Luk Yu is probably featured in every tourist guidebook ever written, but it’s worth putting up with the fanny packs and condescending service for two things: the gorgeous, meticulously maintained 1930s decor, and the sweet and sour pork. The latter, lest you think it a fabricated Chinatown dish, does in fact have its roots in China. At Luk Yu, the sauce is made the traditional way, with hawthorn, giving the deep‐fried nuggets of pork a deeper, cherry‐like color and a more rounded tartness than the ketchup‐and‐vinegar takeout variety. [$$]

Janice Leung Hayes

25. The Chinnery at Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong

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5 Connaught Road, Central
Central and Western District, Hong Kong
+852 2825 4009

Colonial Hong Kong had its awkward moments, like when the Chinnery used to be a women‐free zone. Thankfully, that changed in 1990, and now anyone can darken its meticulously polished timber doors and order a perfectly executed Manhattan from the ivory‐jacketed barman. Consider dropping in for a lunch of tikka masala, served in actual silver dishes just as it was in the 1960s. [$$]

The Chinnery / Official

26. Tsui Wah Restaurant 翠華餐廳

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G/F-2/F, Hong Kong House, 17-19 Wellington St, Central
Central and Western District, Hong Kong
+852 2525 6338
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After a night on the tiles and too many shots, there are few things more comforting than Tsui Wah’s baked pork chop rice — egg fried rice topped with a fried pork chop and either curry or tomato sauce, finished off in the broiler. This 24‐hour establishment is the classic post‐clubbing spot, and it’s well‐lit, ensuring you get a good look at your Tinder date before heading back out into the night. [$]

Janice Leung Hayes

27. Belon

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41 Elgin St
Central, Hong Kong

In a few short years, Daniel Calvert and his team have made Belon a force to be reckoned with, not just in Hong Kong, but globally. The precise, deceptively simple, classically inspired French plates hint at Calvert’s training at the likes of Pied à Terre in London, Per Se in New York, and Epicure in Paris, but the results (think: an unadorned plate with a bar of foie gras torchon so smooth it looks airbrushed and a row of preserved blueberries) have created a culinary lexicon of their own.

A dish at Belon
Belon

28. Amber

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The Landmark Edinburgh Tower (the Landmark Mandarin Oriental Hotel), 11-19A Queen's Road Central
Central, Hong Kong
+852 2132 0066
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When Amber opened in 2005, fine dining in Hong Kong was, for the most part, all about stuffy, old-fashioned French food, with everything flown in from Europe. Chef Richard Ekkebus arguably changed all that, first translating ingredients like Japanese sea urchin into dishes fit for a modern European culinary lexicon, then, with its refurbishment, overseeing a pivot toward a radically pared-back form of fine dining, leaning into East Asian fundamentals like wild vegetables, dashi, and steaming. Amber tops most restaurant guides and lists, internationally and globally, so book well in advance. [$$$$]

Amber
Amber

29. Arcane

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18 On LAN Street 3/f
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
+852 2728 0178
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In a city where more is more, Arcane is a bit of a dark horse. This quietly sophisticated fine diner showcases the work of Shane Osborn, Australian by way of London’s Michelin-starred Pied à Terre, now known more widely for his bromance with fellow Aussie finalist Mark Best on Netflix’s The Final Table. With much of the produce coming from Japan, as well as the restaurant’s own petite kitchen garden, dishes are in tune with the seasons. Don’t be surprised to see combinations like Australian wagyu with yamaimo (Japanese mountain yam) and espelette. [$$$$]

Arcane / Official

30. Mott 32 卅二公館

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B/F, Standard Chartered Bank Building, 4-4A Des Voeux Rd C
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
+852 2885 8688
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While it’s named after the New York City Chinatown street, this is far from your neighborhood takeout joint. The super‐sleek restaurant occupies the basement of a bank, attracting a beautiful crowd with its well‐executed, slightly modernized pan‐Chinese fare— from local favorite char siu (barbecued pork) to a slightly numbing Sichuan‐style peanut, chile, and pork stir‐fry. Start dinner with a cocktail, such as Hong Kong iced tea, featuring tequila and jasmine tea, served whimsically in a sealed bubble tea cup. [$$$$]

Mott 32 / Official

31. On Lee Noodle 安利魚蛋粉麵

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22 Shau Kei Wan Main St E
Shau Kei Wan, Hong Kong
+852 2513 8398

Before it was Asia’s financial center, Hong Kong was made up of a series of fishing villages, and seafood snacks, like fish ball noodle soup (the “fish balls” are actually made from eel), remain a typical lunch. On Lee has been in the neighborhood for over 50 years, starting out as a dai pai dong (street food cart). To sample all its specialties at once, order a bowl of noodles with a combination of fish cake, fish balls, and beef brisket. [$]

32. Master Low Key (Dai Diu Go Sau)

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Kwong Shun Building, 76 Shau Kei Wan Main St E
Shau Kei Wan, Hong Kong

As street carts disappear from the streets, so have egg waffles (aka eggettes), and a good one is hard to come by these days. Master Low Key is indeed a master of the craft — each “egg” is crunchy on the outside and slightly hollow, with a little just-cooked batter inside. Be prepared to queue, especially on weekends. [$]

Janice Leung Hayes

33. Zhejiang Heen 浙江軒

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2-3/F, Kiu Fu Commercial Bldg, 300-306 Lockhart Rd, Wanchai
Wanchai, Hong Kong
+852 2877 9011
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After Cantonese immigrants from neighboring Guangdong province, the second most prominent group of people in Hong Kong hail from Shanghai. Trade groups and fraternities associated with the region are still going strong, and one of the trade groups opened Zhe Jiang Heen as a sort of restaurant‐slash‐clubhouse. Luckily you don’t have to be brokering a deal in Shanghai to gain access, so everyone can get a taste of classic Shanghainese dishes like shrimp stir‐fried with Longjing tea leaves, smoked eggs, and hongshao rou (slow‐cooked pork belly in a dark soy and vinegar sauce). [$$$]

Zhejiang Heen / Official

34. Seventh Son 家全七福

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Hong Kong, Wan Chai
Lockhart Rd, 57-73號華美 粵 海 酒店 3 樓

For a taste of classic, high‐end Cantonese cooking, you can’t go past Seventh Son. The restaurant may only be a few years old, but the recipes and techniques reflect generations of tradition. Pre‐order the suckling pig if you’re part of a large group. [$$$]

A dish at Seventh Son
Seventh Son / Facebook

35. Kin's Kitchen 留家廚房

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5/F, W Square, 314-324 Hennessy Rd
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
+852 2571 0913
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Kin’s Kitchen is about as close as you can get to Cantonese home cooking without an invitation to someone’s house. It’s operated by father and son Kin‐wai Lau and Chun Lau, both of whom are food writers with a scholarly approach to Chinese cuisine, and eating here is like tasting recipes that have been refined and distilled from generations of home cooks. You’ll be thinking about the steamed egg custard topped with morels for days. [$$]

Kin's Kitchen / Official

36. Kam's Roast Goose 甘牌燒鵝

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G/F, Po Wah Commercial Centre, 226-226A Hennessy Rd
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
+852 2520 1110
Visit Website

Flip through any Hong Kong guidebook written before 2010, and Yung Kee was probably high on the restaurant list for its famous roast goose. It was a Hong Kong legend, but a high‐profile family feud regarding ownership of the restaurant divided the clientele. Many food lovers now prefer Kam’s; it’s operated by a portion of the family that left Yung Kee and took chefs with them. Although a much less glamorous establishment than Yung Kee, Kam's lack of VIP rooms and frivolous banquet menus means that they concentrate on what they do best — Cantonese‐style barbecued meats. [$$]

Kam's / Official

37. Sijie Sichuan Private Kitchen 四姐川菜

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10/F, Bartlock Centre, 3 Yiu Wa St
Causeway Bay, Hong Kong
+852 2802 2250
Visit Website

Sichuan food, with all its chiles, vinegars and spices, is almost as foreign to the subtle seasonings favored by Hongkongers as it is to the American palate. Sijie (and her eponymous restaurant) was the first to bring untamed, fully-dialed-in Sichuan flavors to Hong Kong. Sijie herself will even come out and chug a beer with you at the end of the meal. [$$]

38. Sun Kwai Heung BBQ food

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2556 1183

Like debates about the best pizza in New York or the best baguette in Paris, Hongkongers will never be able to agree on the ultimate char siu, the glazed Cantonese-style barbecued pork. But ask any food obsessive for their favorite and the glossy, almost candied roast pork from Sun Kwai Heung will probably be on their top 10 list. Make it a lunchbox by asking for some rice on the side. [$]

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1. Hoover Cake Shop 豪華餅店

136 Nga Tsin Wai Rd, Kowloon City, Hong Kong
Hoover Cake Shop / Official

Egg tarts — little tarts with a pie crust or flaky pastry base filled with a delicate egg custard — are a Hong Kong staple, and Hoover makes one of the best. Despite the shop being in a run‐down neighborhood, don’t be surprised to see white‐gloved chauffeurs pulling up to pile boxes into fancy cars. [$]

136 Nga Tsin Wai Rd
Kowloon City, Hong Kong

2. Chiu Chow Hop Shing Dessert

Hong Kong, 九龍城龍崗道9號號地下

This fourth-generation dessert spot specializes in sweets from Chiu Chow (also known as Teochew or Chaozhou), a region in far eastern Guangdong with its own distinct culture — and desserts such as lotus seeds cooked in light syrup, served with a hard-boiled egg. This late-night favorite also serves a huge range of modern creations, like vanilla sundaes with black glutinous rice and mango jelly with evaporated milk. [$]

3. Islam Food

Hong Kong, Kowloon City, Lung Kong Rd, 地下及閣樓
Pan fried beef bun at Islam Food
Islam Food

Hong Kong boasts a considerable Muslim population from China, Indonesia, Pakistan and beyond, and with them comes plenty of opportunities to savor the hearty halal Chinese dishes, which takes inspiration from Xinjiang cuisine, known for its love of spice. There’s at least one platter of veal goulash pockets on every table — you won’t go wrong by following suit. [$-$$]

Hong Kong, Kowloon City
Lung Kong Rd, 地下及閣樓

4. Mui Kee at Fa Yuen Street Market 花園街街市

Shop11-12, 4/F, Fa Yuen Street Municipal Services Bldg, 123A Fa Yuen St, Mong Kok, Hong Kong

Congee, the porridge made from rice and water (or stock), is comfort food for Hongkongers, and it makes for a hearty breakfast or a light lunch. Mui Kee’s fish stock congee continuously draws people to the food court on the top floor of a municipal market. Choose your own additions — anything from fresh fish slices to pig’s liver— and slurp it up, perhaps with an iced lemon tea on the side. [$]

Shop11-12, 4/F, Fa Yuen Street Municipal Services Bldg, 123A Fa Yuen St
Mong Kok, Hong Kong

5. TAP The Ale Project

G/F, 15 Hak Po Street, Mong Kok, Hong Kong
TAP / Official

Hong Kong has its share of craft breweries, and craft beer bars have popped up all over town. Few are as serious as TAP, however, where draft and bottle offerings are on constant rotation with both local and international brews, and the staff have a real passion for beer. The food is no afterthought, either, with excellent bar bites like a Cubano made with siu yuk (Cantonese crispy roast pork). [$$]

G/F, 15 Hak Po Street
Mong Kok, Hong Kong

6. Woodlands Indian Vegetarian Restaurant 活蘭印度素食

Tsim Sha Tsui Wing On Plaza UG16-17 62 Mody Road |, P1, MTR exit, Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong

Tsim Sha Tsui is known as a hub for Hong Kong’s Indian community, so it’s little surprise that the city’s oldest Indian vegetarian restaurant is here. Woodlands is a predominantly South Indian restaurant, meaning dosas are the name of the game, and spice fiends have been digging into these massive, crispy pancakes for almost 40 years. [$$]

Tsim Sha Tsui Wing On Plaza UG16-17 62 Mody Road |, P1, MTR exit
Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong

7. Peking Garden Restaurant 北京樓

Hong Kong, Tsim Sha Tsui, HK 九龍 尖沙咀 尖沙咀星光行3樓 3/F., Star House
Peking duck at Peking Garden
Maxim’s Chinese Cuisine

For decades, local families have been celebrating with Peking Garden’s duck, beggar’s chicken (chicken baked in a pastry casing), and noodles pulled tableside. While no one minded the ’80s decor, the recent freshening up was a welcome change, making it an even better place to take in the views of Victoria Harbour, and for the right price too. [$$]

Hong Kong, Tsim Sha Tsui
HK 九龍 尖沙咀 尖沙咀星光行3樓 3/F., Star House

8. Yan Toh Heen

Yan Toh Heen, Lower Level, InterContinental Hong Kong, 18 Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong

The most iconic postcard view of Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbor is best seen from Kowloon, and Yan Toh Heen’s sea-level, harborside setting offers front-row views. Although the hotel is due to be renovated this year, its flagship Chinese restaurant got its facelift a little earlier, which ensures that the well-loved restaurant remains open during the hotel’s temporary closure. Chef Yiu-fai Lau has been with the hotel since it opened, and continues to please with meticulously made Cantonese classics, such as dim sum, as well as Chinese favorites like Peking duck. [$$$]

Yan Toh Heen, Lower Level, InterContinental Hong Kong, 18 Salisbury Road
Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong

9. Hoi On Cafe 海安㗎啡室

17 Connaught Rd W, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong
Hoi On Cafe / Official

Locals love cha chaan teng food, a uniquely Hong Kong cuisine that mostly consists of pseudo‐Western concoctions like macaroni with ham in soup; deep‐fried peanut butter sandwiches known as “French” toast; and sweetened condensed milk poured over red bean paste and a compressed ball of shaved ice, a concoction that's halfway between a dessert and a beverage. Hoi On was once the cha chaan teng of choice for sailors docking at the nearby ports. Several years ago the owner’s daughter gave the place a good scrub, and, to bring back its former glory, hired new staff — including bakers to make their famous coconut tarts. [$]

17 Connaught Rd W
Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

10. Yardbird

154-158 Wing Lok St, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong
Skewers at Yardbird
Yardbird/Facebook

Yardbird was the first restaurant opened by Matt Abergel (a Masa alum) and Lindsay Jang, and they’ve since become legends in Hong Kong’s notoriously finicky restaurant scene. Their restaurant is almost five years old, and it’s still one of the hottest spots in town. Yakitori is the name of the game. Every part of the chicken is served, from skewers of hearts to crispy skin on rice. There are no reservations; queuing is part of the experience. And be sure to have a drink — the Japanese‐influenced beverage program is one of a kind. [$$$$]

154-158 Wing Lok St
Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

11. Sushi Saito

Hong Kong, 45th floor, 8號 Finance St, Central, Hong Kong

Takashi Saito’s three-Michelin-starred sushiya in Tokyo is one of the most highly sought-after tables among globetrotting gourmands. His only overseas outlet (for now) is in Hong Kong, and is helmed by Ikuya Kobayashi, who works with ingredients handpicked by Saito and flown in daily. A seat is hard to score, but it’s worth the effort for what is possibly the best sushi in town. [$$$$]

Hong Kong, 45th floor, 8號 Finance St
Central, Hong Kong

12. The Lounge at the Four Seasons Hotel Hong Kong

Hong Kong, 中環金融街8號
The Lounge at the Four Seasons
Four Seasons

Hong Kong may no longer be under British rule, but the tradition of afternoon tea is still going strong. For an all-frills experience, the Lounge at Four Seasons Hong Kong is hard to beat, complete with floor-to-ceiling harbor views, a classic three-tiered presentation, plus additional dishes passed around throughout tea time. [$$$]

13. Chan Kan Kee Chiu Chow 陳勤記鹵鵝飯店

11 Queen's Rd W, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

The city of Chaozhou (still more commonly known by its old name, Chiu Chow) is officially part of Guangdong (Canton), but is culturally distinct: Chiu Chow people speak their own dialect and have their own distinctive foods. Chan Kan Kee is a specialist in lo shui, in which foods like goose, tofu, and eggs are poached in a liquid mostly flavored with soy sauce and five spice. [$$]

11 Queen's Rd W
Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

14. Okra

110號 Queen's Rd W, Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong