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A red barn set by a lake in lush green woods.
Knystaforsen.
Eva H. Tram

The 16 Essential Restaurants in Halland, Sweden

Fire-roasted pheasant, pastries stuffed with wild fruits, and more of the best things to eat in Halland

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Knystaforsen.
| Eva H. Tram

On the Swedish west coast, between the country’s second-largest city, Gothenburg, and the breadbasket of Skåne, there’s Halland. The county, a bit bigger than Delaware, has a long and proud history of farming and food production. The landscape of rolling hills, grain fields, grazing cattle, deep forests, mighty rivers, and beautiful coastline provide every restaurant with a well-stocked pantry and fridge.

This wealth has attracted all kinds of food lovers. At Feldts Bröd & Konfekt in Halmstad, pioneering entrepreneur My Feldt uses locally milled flour and local fruits for pastries. In Falkenberg, a town farther north along the coast, an abandoned fish export building has become the home of natural wine bar Glou Glou. Deep in the woods, Eva and Nicolai Tram serve upward of 15 courses based on farmed, foraged, and hunted ingredients at their Michelin-starred Knystaforsen. Across the region, guests and hosts share a particularly strong connection; many restaurateurs live on the premises of their businesses, and some of the area’s best restaurants are situated in hotels and resorts (alongside wineries, nature reserves, and floating saunas). Eating and drinking in Halland always means you’re in good company.

Per Styregård is a Swedish journalist and author based in Stockholm.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Cosa Table

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Kungsbacka, close to Gothenburg at the northern tip of Halland, is the home of the restaurant Cosa Table, where a set menu with four or six dishes is the best way to experience the kitchen’s interpretation of Nordic cuisine. Ingredients are primarily sourced from small-scale, very local producers, combined with a few additions from neighboring Skåne, Småland, and Östergötland. You can also just pop by for a snack or a bottle from the restaurant’s list of nonintervention wines. The light, bright Scandinavian-style chairs, tables, and other interior details are for sale in the sister store, Cosa Home Stories, across the street.

An unseen chef pours sauce into a dish of white petals.
An artful dish at Cosa Table.
Cosa Table

Bar Glou Glou

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When the wine bar Glou Glou opened in the same building as Kustbageriet, in the port of Varberg in June 2022, the idea was to create a sustainable space for an easy glass of wine. Much of the interior is constructed from Euro pallets, old fridge doors, stainless steel tables, and whatever was left by the previous tenants. The wine list features easy-to-drink, nonintervention wines from artisanal producers, partially focusing on Central and Eastern Europe. The shareable dishes are prepared in the Italian wood-fired stone oven, mostly from local vegetables.

From above, two large mussels on a bed of green tomatoes.
Mussels with seaweed and pickled green tomatoes.
Bar Glou Glou

Kustbageriet

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Bakery Kustbageriet is located in an old fish export warehouse in the port of Varberg, next door to the wine bar Glou Glou. All the bread is baked with organic flour from millers Bengt Nybergh and Andreas Nielsen at the nearby family-owned mill Limabacka Kvarn. One of the bakery’s signature breads is the Bamberg, a beautiful three-pound loaf of sourdough rye. There’s also a long list of classic breads and pastries that take turns on the shelves, like chausson au poire; caramelized apple doughnuts; cookies with burnt butter and Valrhona chocolate; pizza with chanterelles, cheddar, and Breckland thyme; and cinnamon and cardamom buns.

Head chef Filip Gemzell and restaurant manager Ann-Catrine Johansson met while working at Huset, a restaurant on the rough northern Norwegian island of Svalbard. At Äng, they bring the influences from that harsh climate to the fertile fields of Halland, creating something special — and Michelin-starred as of 2021. The tasting menu at Äng comes from the nearby fields, forests, and beaches, but the global cooking techniques come from all over. The restaurant is part of the organic winery Ästad, but the deep wine cellar is filled with bottles from heavy-hitting producers around the world. The property also includes a hotel, a spa, and a second restaurant, Logen (the Barn), serving rustic comfort food based on local produce.

A greenhouse in the middle of a field in later afternoon.
Outside Äng.
Ästad Vingård

Björkängs Fisk

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Once upon a time, one could buy fish right off the boat in just about any port in Halland. The depletion of the sea, not only in Halland but just about everywhere, put an end to that. However, there are still a few fish shacks along the coast with their own fishing boats offering fresh delicacies. Björkängs Fisk, in Tvååker, is run by two brothers, Mattias Larsson and Mikael Bernhardt, who sustainably catch fish using a seine-style net. The selection of seafood changes daily. Occasionally, there are exquisite but underestimated mackerel, which lose their delicious flavor by the minute after they’re caught. Some days, there are flat fish, like sole, plaice, turbot, brill, and European flounder. Most often, there’s a selection of shellfish prepared in-house like langoustines, crabs, lobsters, and shrimp, all ready to bring to picnics and beach parties.

Knystaforsen

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Owners Eva and Nicolai Tram turned a derelict 1870s sawmill in Rydöbruk, in the Halland backwoods, into a Michelin-starred restaurant. They made it their home too, living upstairs with their two sons. At Knystaforsen, opened in November 2020, the kitchen team cooks all the food on the open fire outside the restaurant. Most ingredients are local, including fish from nearby lake Bolmen and game like pheasant, duck, and fallow deer. All the beverage pairings on the multicourse menu (which can stretch past 15 dishes) are Swedish, including wine, mead, cider, and innovative nonalcoholic alternatives made in-house from local herbs, fruits, berries, and weeds. Rydöbruk is a brukssamhälle, or company town, a small community where everything is owned and operated by a single business, including sister pizzeria Knystaria and a manor where guests can stay the night.

Multiple wood fires blaze near an outdoor kitchen where pots hang from the rafters and mis en place waits to be cooked.
The outdoor cooking setup at Knystaforsen.
Eva H. Tram

Knystaria

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Spots of colorful paint on the softwood floor are evidence of this old barn’s former life as the studio of a local artist community. Since 2021, it’s been a pizzeria, also serving breakfast to guests staying overnight in the manor on the premises. While sister business Knystaforsen represents an exclusive fine dining experience with just a few seats, the pizzeria is large, relaxed, and family-oriented. The sourdough pies are baked in a wood-fired oven imported from Naples. Some of the toppings include ’nduja with caramelized onion, cavolo nero with mushrooms, mortadella with pistachio, and tomato with grilled vegetables. There’s even a dessert pizza topped with apple puree, pistachios, and sweet ricotta.

A chef pours oil from a metal decanter onto a finished pizza.
Finishing a pie with some oil.
Eva H. Tram

Lis Mejeri

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Few restaurants announce the courses of a tasting menu quite like Lis Mejeri. The staff distributes ear protection to small children and cranks up the music (chosen to suit each dish), before one of the owners bursts in dancing hard in an animal suit (also chosen to match the food). The setting for this gastronomic spectacle is a historic two-storied brick building that was once a dairy and now serves as the home of the owners’ family. Despite the modern theatrics, they have kept much of the original charm of the place intact and added plenty of vintage decorations and furniture to create a surprisingly homey feeling.

A chef works in an open kitchen.
At work in the kitchen at Lis Mejeri.
Per Styregård

Stedsans

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Stedsans used to be located in a greenhouse on a rooftop in the middle of Copenhagen, serving food based on plants and vegetables from its own farm and nearby producers. In 2017, the Danish couple who owned the spot, chefs Mette Helbaek (twin sister of Eva Tram at Knystaforsen) and Flemming Schiøtt Hansen, decided to move to the backwoods of eastern Halland. They reimagined their business as a sustainable resort featuring 16 wooden cabins, a floating sauna, lake water showers, and a forest gym. Dinner is served family-style around a large communal table, and the menu is mostly based on produce from the property’s regenerative garden, combined with whatever else the team has foraged, caught, or shot locally. The beverage list is made up of natural wines and alcohol-free choices, also made with ingredients from Stedsans’ own herbal garden and forest plants.

From above, sliced beets beneath crumbled cheese and herbs.
A wintery dish of beets and cheese.
Stedsans

Lilla Napoli

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One of the toughest reservations in Halland is at Lilla Napoli, a hugely popular pizzeria housed in a shack with tables in a parking lot. The place serves high-quality, moderately priced pizzas based on delicacies from near and far, like mushrooms, pecorino, ’nduja, pancetta, smoked pork belly, and oregano. Make space for the dessert pizza, made with Nutella, mascarpone, hazelnut, strawberries, and ice cream. Half of Lilla Napoli’s popularity is due to the wine festival the pizzeria hosts each summer, when the most successful wine importers focusing on small-scale producers show up on weekends to take turns pouring wines and playing music.

From above, a pizza topped with dollops of cream and fruit.
Dessert pizza.
Per Styregård

Prostens Pizza

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Despite its name and the large pizza oven that’s the centerpiece of the kitchen, Prostens Pizza is less of a pizzeria and more of a countryside restaurant and retreat for stressed-out souls. The interior is warm and inviting, while outdoor summer seating overlooks grazing cows and fertile fields. Both inside and outside are excellent backdrops to enjoy the very thin Roman-style pizzas, as well as a weekly list of small dishes like bao with pork, grilled broccoli with salted lemon curd, beef tartare with pickled chanterelle, or risotto with langoustine.

A full pizza with myriad toppings and drizzles of white sauce.
Well-topped pizza from Prostens Pizza.
Per Styregård

Slöinge Kafferosteri

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The micro-roastery Slöinge Kafferosteri supplies coffee to the bustling cafe Solhaga Stenugnsbageri across the street. But the team at Slöinge Kafferosteri was also inspired by their neighbor to open their own venue featuring coffee, tea, bespoke chocolate bars, and cakes. Set in a well-preserved mid-1900s hotel, Slöinge Kafferosteri sources single-origin beans from estates across the world and roasts them in small batches. Enjoy the coffee with a chocolate bar from Standout Chocolate in Kållered, an hour north of Slöinge, which produces exquisite, handmade bean-to-bar chocolates made from organic beans and cane sugar.

Solhaga Stenugnsbageri

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The village of Slöinge used to have one single culinary attraction, Sia Glass, the largest Swedish-owned ice cream producer, whose factory outlet is still a favorite among visitors. But the area’s turning point came when bakers Sara and Anders Wennerström decided to transform their summer house in the middle of the village into a cafe, starting by renovating the old stone oven in one of their outhouses. Today, Solhaga is one of the most talked about bakeries in Sweden. The menu showcases a long list of classic breads and pastries with Swedish and French influences. Don’t miss out on the frukt and nöt (fruit and nut) bread packed with apricots, muscat raisins, walnuts, and hazelnuts; the solbulle, a sweet bun with vanilla cream and jam; or the layered kouign amann. Lately, the Wennerströms have opened up parts of the property on weekends, making it possible to reserve a table to enjoy breakfast, lunch, or afternoon tea.

Steninge Kuststation

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The coast in Steninge is particularly beautiful because of the long stretch of unexploited, protected nature reserve along the beach where sheep graze. The low, rich vegetation is filled with bog myrtle, beach rose, and wild blackberries. In the middle of this coastal range, close to the sea, is hotel Steninge Kuststation. The owners, Catarina Arvidsson and Per Carlsson, are particularly passionate about porridge, arranging competitions in porridge-cooking each year and featuring two porridges on their three-course breakfast menu (available whether or not you’re staying at the hotel). The food is certified One Planet Plate, the World Wildlife Fund’s label for restaurants working to reduce climate impact and increase biodiversity. 

Feldts Tivolikiosk

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Multitalented baker and entrepreneur My Feldt is a mover and shaker in the coastal party and port town of Halmstad, toward Halland’s southern edge. Once the proprietor of a combo cafe and bicycle repair shop, in 2021, she got rid of the bikes to focus on the food. Now the space has a carnival theme, with an adjacent ice cream parlor, Feldts Glasskiosk (open May to September), which features store-made organic ice cream, sprinkles, and right-off-the-iron cones. Lunch dishes at Tivolikiosken are prepared by Fredrik Johnson, formerly head chef and owner of Michelin-starred Volt in Stockholm (now closed). Try the signature falafel made from Swedish heirloom yellow peas, pureed lemons, and quince juice.

A worker in carnival garb stands beside a popcorn maker, in a space overflowing with tchotchkes.
Inside Tivolikiosk’s carnivalesque space.
Per Styregård

Feldts Bröd & Konfekt

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Halmstad baker My Feldt has been running the city’s most well-visited bakery and cafe, Feldt’s Bröd & Konfekt, together with her brother, Patrick Oscarsson, since 2012. All ingredients are organic, the flour is primarily sourced from local mills, and local farms and forests supply many of the seasonal ingredients in the wide selection of bread, cakes, pastries, toffees, and confections on the counter. Look out for raspberry mazarin, lemon tartlets, chocolate cookies, spelt brownies, rhubarb pie, French nougat, raspberry and licorice toffee, and apple doughnuts with vanilla cream. The bakery offers a few cozy seats indoors and seasonal outdoor seating.

From above, several patterned loaves dusted with flour.
Loaves at Feldts Bröd & Konfekt.
Per Styregård

Cosa Table

Kungsbacka, close to Gothenburg at the northern tip of Halland, is the home of the restaurant Cosa Table, where a set menu with four or six dishes is the best way to experience the kitchen’s interpretation of Nordic cuisine. Ingredients are primarily sourced from small-scale, very local producers, combined with a few additions from neighboring Skåne, Småland, and Östergötland. You can also just pop by for a snack or a bottle from the restaurant’s list of nonintervention wines. The light, bright Scandinavian-style chairs, tables, and other interior details are for sale in the sister store, Cosa Home Stories, across the street.

An unseen chef pours sauce into a dish of white petals.
An artful dish at Cosa Table.
Cosa Table

Bar Glou Glou

When the wine bar Glou Glou opened in the same building as Kustbageriet, in the port of Varberg in June 2022, the idea was to create a sustainable space for an easy glass of wine. Much of the interior is constructed from Euro pallets, old fridge doors, stainless steel tables, and whatever was left by the previous tenants. The wine list features easy-to-drink, nonintervention wines from artisanal producers, partially focusing on Central and Eastern Europe. The shareable dishes are prepared in the Italian wood-fired stone oven, mostly from local vegetables.

From above, two large mussels on a bed of green tomatoes.
Mussels with seaweed and pickled green tomatoes.
Bar Glou Glou

Kustbageriet

Bakery Kustbageriet is located in an old fish export warehouse in the port of Varberg, next door to the wine bar Glou Glou. All the bread is baked with organic flour from millers Bengt Nybergh and Andreas Nielsen at the nearby family-owned mill Limabacka Kvarn. One of the bakery’s signature breads is the Bamberg, a beautiful three-pound loaf of sourdough rye. There’s also a long list of classic breads and pastries that take turns on the shelves, like chausson au poire; caramelized apple doughnuts; cookies with burnt butter and Valrhona chocolate; pizza with chanterelles, cheddar, and Breckland thyme; and cinnamon and cardamom buns.

Äng

Head chef Filip Gemzell and restaurant manager Ann-Catrine Johansson met while working at Huset, a restaurant on the rough northern Norwegian island of Svalbard. At Äng, they bring the influences from that harsh climate to the fertile fields of Halland, creating something special — and Michelin-starred as of 2021. The tasting menu at Äng comes from the nearby fields, forests, and beaches, but the global cooking techniques come from all over. The restaurant is part of the organic winery Ästad, but the deep wine cellar is filled with bottles from heavy-hitting producers around the world. The property also includes a hotel, a spa, and a second restaurant, Logen (the Barn), serving rustic comfort food based on local produce.

A greenhouse in the middle of a field in later afternoon.
Outside Äng.
Ästad Vingård

Björkängs Fisk

Once upon a time, one could buy fish right off the boat in just about any port in Halland. The depletion of the sea, not only in Halland but just about everywhere, put an end to that. However, there are still a few fish shacks along the coast with their own fishing boats offering fresh delicacies. Björkängs Fisk, in Tvååker, is run by two brothers, Mattias Larsson and Mikael Bernhardt, who sustainably catch fish using a seine-style net. The selection of seafood changes daily. Occasionally, there are exquisite but underestimated mackerel, which lose their delicious flavor by the minute after they’re caught. Some days, there are flat fish, like sole, plaice, turbot, brill, and European flounder. Most often, there’s a selection of shellfish prepared in-house like langoustines, crabs, lobsters, and shrimp, all ready to bring to picnics and beach parties.

Knystaforsen

Owners Eva and Nicolai Tram turned a derelict 1870s sawmill in Rydöbruk, in the Halland backwoods, into a Michelin-starred restaurant. They made it their home too, living upstairs with their two sons. At Knystaforsen, opened in November 2020, the kitchen team cooks all the food on the open fire outside the restaurant. Most ingredients are local, including fish from nearby lake Bolmen and game like pheasant, duck, and fallow deer. All the beverage pairings on the multicourse menu (which can stretch past 15 dishes) are Swedish, including wine, mead, cider, and innovative nonalcoholic alternatives made in-house from local herbs, fruits, berries, and weeds. Rydöbruk is a brukssamhälle, or company town, a small community where everything is owned and operated by a single business, including sister pizzeria Knystaria and a manor where guests can stay the night.

Multiple wood fires blaze near an outdoor kitchen where pots hang from the rafters and mis en place waits to be cooked.
The outdoor cooking setup at Knystaforsen.
Eva H. Tram

Knystaria

Spots of colorful paint on the softwood floor are evidence of this old barn’s former life as the studio of a local artist community. Since 2021, it’s been a pizzeria, also serving breakfast to guests staying overnight in the manor on the premises. While sister business Knystaforsen represents an exclusive fine dining experience with just a few seats, the pizzeria is large, relaxed, and family-oriented. The sourdough pies are baked in a wood-fired oven imported from Naples. Some of the toppings include ’nduja with caramelized onion, cavolo nero with mushrooms, mortadella with pistachio, and tomato with grilled vegetables. There’s even a dessert pizza topped with apple puree, pistachios, and sweet ricotta.

A chef pours oil from a metal decanter onto a finished pizza.
Finishing a pie with some oil.
Eva H. Tram

Lis Mejeri

Few restaurants announce the courses of a tasting menu quite like Lis Mejeri. The staff distributes ear protection to small children and cranks up the music (chosen to suit each dish), before one of the owners bursts in dancing hard in an animal suit (also chosen to match the food). The setting for this gastronomic spectacle is a historic two-storied brick building that was once a dairy and now serves as the home of the owners’ family. Despite the modern theatrics, they have kept much of the original charm of the place intact and added plenty of vintage decorations and furniture to create a surprisingly homey feeling.

A chef works in an open kitchen.
At work in the kitchen at Lis Mejeri.
Per Styregård

Stedsans

Stedsans used to be located in a greenhouse on a rooftop in the middle of Copenhagen, serving food based on plants and vegetables from its own farm and nearby producers. In 2017, the Danish couple who owned the spot, chefs Mette Helbaek (twin sister of Eva Tram at Knystaforsen) and Flemming Schiøtt Hansen, decided to move to the backwoods of eastern Halland. They reimagined their business as a sustainable resort featuring 16 wooden cabins, a floating sauna, lake water showers, and a forest gym. Dinner is served family-style around a large communal table, and the menu is mostly based on produce from the property’s regenerative garden, combined with whatever else the team has foraged, caught, or shot locally. The beverage list is made up of natural wines and alcohol-free choices, also made with ingredients from Stedsans’ own herbal garden and forest plants.

From above, sliced beets beneath crumbled cheese and herbs.
A wintery dish of beets and cheese.
Stedsans

Lilla Napoli

One of the toughest reservations in Halland is at Lilla Napoli, a hugely popular pizzeria housed in a shack with tables in a parking lot. The place serves high-quality, moderately priced pizzas based on delicacies from near and far, like mushrooms, pecorino, ’nduja, pancetta, smoked pork belly, and oregano. Make space for the dessert pizza, made with Nutella, mascarpone, hazelnut, strawberries, and ice cream. Half of Lilla Napoli’s popularity is due to the wine festival the pizzeria hosts each summer, when the most successful wine importers focusing on small-scale producers show up on weekends to take turns pouring wines and playing music.

From above, a pizza topped with dollops of cream and fruit.
Dessert pizza.
Per Styregård

Prostens Pizza

Despite its name and the large pizza oven that’s the centerpiece of the kitchen, Prostens Pizza is less of a pizzeria and more of a countryside restaurant and retreat for stressed-out souls. The interior is warm and inviting, while outdoor summer seating overlooks grazing cows and fertile fields. Both inside and outside are excellent backdrops to enjoy the very thin Roman-style pizzas, as well as a weekly list of small dishes like bao with pork, grilled broccoli with salted lemon curd, beef tartare with pickled chanterelle, or risotto with langoustine.

A full pizza with myriad toppings and drizzles of white sauce.
Well-topped pizza from Prostens Pizza.
Per Styregård

Slöinge Kafferosteri

The micro-roastery Slöinge Kafferosteri supplies coffee to the bustling cafe Solhaga Stenugnsbageri across the street. But the team at Slöinge Kafferosteri was also inspired by their neighbor to open their own venue featuring coffee, tea, bespoke chocolate bars, and cakes. Set in a well-preserved mid-1900s hotel, Slöinge Kafferosteri sources single-origin beans from estates across the world and roasts them in small batches. Enjoy the coffee with a chocolate bar from Standout Chocolate in Kållered, an hour north of Slöinge, which produces exquisite, handmade bean-to-bar chocolates made from organic beans and cane sugar.

Solhaga Stenugnsbageri

The village of Slöinge used to have one single culinary attraction, Sia Glass, the largest Swedish-owned ice cream producer, whose factory outlet is still a favorite among visitors. But the area’s turning point came when bakers Sara and Anders Wennerström decided to transform their summer house in the middle of the village into a cafe, starting by renovating the old stone oven in one of their outhouses. Today, Solhaga is one of the most talked about bakeries in Sweden. The menu showcases a long list of classic breads and pastries with Swedish and French influences. Don’t miss out on the frukt and nöt (fruit and nut) bread packed with apricots, muscat raisins, walnuts, and hazelnuts; the solbulle, a sweet bun with vanilla cream and jam; or the layered kouign amann. Lately, the Wennerströms have opened up parts of the property on weekends, making it possible to reserve a table to enjoy breakfast, lunch, or afternoon tea.

Steninge Kuststation

The coast in Steninge is particularly beautiful because of the long stretch of unexploited, protected nature reserve along the beach where sheep graze. The low, rich vegetation is filled with bog myrtle, beach rose, and wild blackberries. In the middle of this coastal range, close to the sea, is hotel Steninge Kuststation. The owners, Catarina Arvidsson and Per Carlsson, are particularly passionate about porridge, arranging competitions in porridge-cooking each year and featuring two porridges on their three-course breakfast menu (available whether or not you’re staying at the hotel). The food is certified One Planet Plate, the World Wildlife Fund’s label for restaurants working to reduce climate impact and increase biodiversity. 

Feldts Tivolikiosk

Multitalented baker and entrepreneur My Feldt is a mover and shaker in the coastal party and port town of Halmstad, toward Halland’s southern edge. Once the proprietor of a combo cafe and bicycle repair shop, in 2021, she got rid of the bikes to focus on the food. Now the space has a carnival theme, with an adjacent ice cream parlor, Feldts Glasskiosk (open May to September), which features store-made organic ice cream, sprinkles, and right-off-the-iron cones. Lunch dishes at Tivolikiosken are prepared by Fredrik Johnson, formerly head chef and owner of Michelin-starred Volt in Stockholm (now closed). Try the signature falafel made from Swedish heirloom yellow peas, pureed lemons, and quince juice.

A worker in carnival garb stands beside a popcorn maker, in a space overflowing with tchotchkes.
Inside Tivolikiosk’s carnivalesque space.
Per Styregård

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Feldts Bröd & Konfekt

Halmstad baker My Feldt has been running the city’s most well-visited bakery and cafe, Feldt’s Bröd & Konfekt, together with her brother, Patrick Oscarsson, since 2012. All ingredients are organic, the flour is primarily sourced from local mills, and local farms and forests supply many of the seasonal ingredients in the wide selection of bread, cakes, pastries, toffees, and confections on the counter. Look out for raspberry mazarin, lemon tartlets, chocolate cookies, spelt brownies, rhubarb pie, French nougat, raspberry and licorice toffee, and apple doughnuts with vanilla cream. The bakery offers a few cozy seats indoors and seasonal outdoor seating.

From above, several patterned loaves dusted with flour.
Loaves at Feldts Bröd & Konfekt.
Per Styregård

Related Maps