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A plate of fresh pasta with herbs and meat.
Fresh pasta at La Nonna.
La Nonna Ristorante Vail

The 18 Essential Restaurants in Vail, Colorado

An omakase prepped by Nobu Matsuhisa himself, après-ski cocktails at a sleek base camp, fresh pasta from a Dolomites native, wagyu carpaccio at the chill sibling of the most popular spot in town, and more of Vail’s best meals

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Fresh pasta at La Nonna.
| La Nonna Ristorante Vail

One of the world’s best-known ski towns, Vail looks like a storybook version of an alpine village. European-style cafes line charming, pedestrian-only pathways and vistas of the Rocky Mountains’ Gore Range rise in the distance. While most visitors come to ski the legendary back bowls, Vail is also a destination of choice for lovers of luxury hotels and spas, boutique shoppers, art gallery hoppers, and hungry diners.

Vail Village offers a mix of longstanding gourmet gems and laid-back local haunts. And don’t sleep on Beaver Creek, Vail’s sprawling sister ski resort about 20 minutes west on I-70. Collectively, Vail and Beaver Creek boast some of the best dining options anywhere at altitude. In 2023, Colorado finally gained a Michelin Guide, with “recommended” designations given to Osaki’s, Sweet Basil, Mirabelle, Splendido, and Wyld (all included below).

After you’ve secured your ski pass — Vail and Beaver Creek are accessible through Vail Resorts’ Epic Pass — it’s time to iron out your itinerary of hangouts, fine dining favorites, and enduring cheap eats. From dinner at a chef’s own home to an Alice in Wonderland-themed social club, here’s where to eat in Vail and Beaver Creek this season.

Katie Shapiro is a freelance journalist who covers food, wine, and weed from her home base in Colorado’s high country. Her work has appeared in Forbes, The Aspen Times, The Denver Post, Modern Luxury, Curbed, Thrillist, The Infatuation, and more.

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The luxurious Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch resort is tucked away in an exclusive enclave of Beaver Creek, and it’s worth a winding detour up the mountain road for a meal at the hotel’s signature restaurant. Executive chef Jasper Schneider — who also oversees in-house restaurants Sakaba and Buffalos — channels bold cooking techniques, local produce, and hyper-seasonal flavors for lunch and dinner. On weekends, there’s live music on the sprawling deck during lunch and inside during dinner.

A high-ceilinged dining room with white-upholstered chairs around wood tables set for a meal, large windows to one side, and a large artwork on the far wall.
The dining room at Wyld.
Wyld

Mirabelle

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Hidden behind the grand gatehouse of Beaver Creek lies a quaint farmhouse that’s home not only to a bustling French-style bistro but also to chef Daniel Joly, who lives upstairs with his family. A master chef from Belgium, Joly presents European classics with an alpine spin in a candlelit dining room. A special occasion calls for the four-course tasting menu, which features tuna sashimi, sauteed Maine lobster, roasted duck, and a symphony of desserts. A la carte menu standouts include the imported Ossetra caviar service, Alaska sablefish, North Sea dover sole menunière, Colorado farm-raised rack of lamb, and elk tenderloin. You can add seared foie gras to any entree for a fee.

A white-washed dining room decorated with farming and cooking equipment.
The dining room at Mirabelle.
Dominique Taylor/Mirabelle

This wine bar is the perfect pre-dinner pit stop, offering a daily happy hour with the best value on wines by the glass. But after a round of drinks, you may just want to stick around for some seasonal small plates. Items like Colorado bison tartare and crispy Berkshire pork ribs are great for groups, while pan-seared Colorado striped bass and Reminisce ranch beef tenderloin fill out the mains. For dessert, try the orange-thyme Grand Marnier creme brulee.

A dish covered in drizzles of sauce and chopped herbs.
A dish worth sticking around for at Vin 48.
Vin48

Splendido at the Chateau

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Crystal chandeliers, a piano bar, and an open kitchen make for a dramatic and romantic dinner setting inside the gorgeous Chateau Beaver Creek guest lodge. The elegant, white-tablecloth service starts with seafood towers, smoked ham consomme, and Petrossian caviar, followed by sophisticated specialties like swordfish au poivre, Colorado lamb rack, and Long Island duck. And don’t forget to save room for a pillowy lemon or chocolate souffle for dessert.

Two lamb chops on a plate with swirls of greens.
Lamb at Splendido.
Dominique Taylor

Minturn Saloon

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Now under new ownership and fresh off an 18-month restoration project, Vail Valley’s oldest restaurant (built in 1901) is back and better than ever. It’s set in the historic mining town of Minturn, making it a perfect pitstop for anyone traveling between Vail and Beaver Creek, or a great place for a celebratory meal for off-piste skiers who’ve just completed the backcountry Minturn Mile run. The bar, once a secret gambling room, is still chock-full of memorabilia. It’s known for its award-winning margaritas, and musts on the food menu include a cup of posole or bison chili to start, followed by sizzling fajitas, birria tacos, and a pork cheek tostada for the table.

A close-up on saucy ribs with rice and a cheesy side dish blurred on the plate in the background.
Ribs with sides.
Minturn Saloon/Facebook

The Little Diner

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Vail’s only all-day breakfast joint (if your day runs from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.) lives in Lionshead Village, where solo diners can snag a counter seat to try the caramelized onion, tomato, and Swiss crepe, a cottage cheese-filled blintz, or the Dutch-style pancakes. Family-owned and operated by Brian and Peggy Little, the place makes everything from scratch. A lunch menu is also available.

A restaurant exterior with a hanging sign advertising the Little Diner.
Outside the Little Diner.
Little Diner/Facebook

Annapurna

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Nepali and Indian cuisine are Himalayan highlights at this Mount Everest-inspired canteen inside the Evergreen Lodge at Vail. Naan fresh from the clay oven and steaming plates of paneer, masala, and curry go best with a cup of cheeya (black tea brewed with milk and Nepali spices) after a long day on the slopes.

Chasing Rabbits

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What was once a movie theater and restaurant that anchored the Solaris complex (RIP CineBistro’s Colorado locations) is now home to a massive social club with multisensory experiences. There’s a speakeasy, screening room, nightclub, arcade, and restaurant — all decked out in an Alice in Wonderland theme. While members do get access to VIP events, secret menus, liquor lockers, and reservations, this swanky social club welcomes the public, too. Build an entire evening around dinner, which consists of modern Mediterranean cuisine like salmon crudo, whole grilled branzino, and braised rabbit bolognese.

A trio of dishes, including some sort of chicken, a pilaf, and a green soup.
Dishes at Chasing Rabbits.
Chasing Rabbits

Vintage

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You can momentarily escape Vail Village for a quick jaunt to Paris inside this French cafe, which serves traditional brasserie fare, including baked brie, escargot, beef bourguignon, and steak frites. The walls, adorned with posters and antiques, make a perfect backdrop for the food, especially if you go for the decadent Champagne brunch on the weekend.

A stack of two thick French toast slices topped with mascarpone cream, a bacon slice, and berry compote, surrounded by table settings and brunch cocktails.
Huckleberry bacon French toast.
David Gillette Photography

Osaki’s

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The valley’s fresh sushi options range from the splurge-worthy Matsuhisa to the solid, affordable Joy, but for something especially intimate, head to Osaki’s. Chef Takeshi Osaki learned the skill of sushi-making from his grandfather in Osaka, and he trained at Nobu’s Aspen outpost before opening his own spot in the heart of Vail Village. Opt for the Omakase Nigiri (eight pieces) or the Omakase Anything, a fuller spread of sushi and signature dishes.

Alpenrose

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This family-owned European restaurant and patisserie has been a charmer since 1974 (though in 2018, the proprietors of the neighboring German restaurant, Almresi, took over the Vail favorite). Alpenrose’s menu of elevated Old World staples — like raclette, schnitzel, spätzle, and zwiebelkuchen (onion pie) — is best washed down with a big mug of Bavarian beer.

A bright dining room with plain wood tables and chairs (lined with furs) and decorative pendant lights.
The dining room at Alpenrose.
Alpenrose

La Nonna Ristorante Vail

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When La Nonna Ristorante replaced Campo de Fiori, longtime chef Simone Reatti remained through the overhaul, eventually becoming a co-owner. Growing up in Cortina d’Ampezzo, he learned to cook from his nonna, whom he honors through a menu of rustic Italian cuisine. Dinner features Reatti’s favorites from his native village in the Dolomites, including fresh pasta made daily (using Molini Pivetti flour from Italy).

A plate of fresh pasta with herbs and meat.
Fresh pasta at La Nonna.
La Nonna Ristorante Vail

Matsuhisa

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One of three Colorado locations (along with Aspen and Denver) of the famed LA-based Matsuhisa empire shows off sushi at its finest from renowned Japanese chef Nobu Matsuhisa. The high-ceilinged hot spot offers a panoramic view of Vail Mountain and a patio (if it’s warm enough) inside the Solaris complex. For the ultimate dining experience, let the chef be your guide through the omakase menu — especially if that chef is Matushisa himself on one of the coveted “Nobu in Town” nights during the high season, when the master himself is behind the bar crafting signature dishes, schmoozing with guests, and signing cookbooks.

A high-ceilinged dining room with long tables set with red chairs and a bar bearing sake bottles.
The grand interior of Matsuhisa.
Matsuhisa

La Tour Restaurant & Bar

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This French-influenced bistro brings inventive dishes to guests, and the team prides itself on first-class hospitality and a fabulous wine list. The highlights are the truffle French onion soup, wild Burgundy escargot, imported Hokkaido jumbo sea scallops, and crispy panko chicken paillard.

Mountain Standard

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While this restaurant’s 40-year-old sister spot, Sweet Basil, is still the toughest reservation in Vail, try downstairs sibling Mountain Standard for its unfussy gastropub atmosphere. Bone marrow and wagyu carpaccio, wedge salad, and rotisserie chicken are among the comforting and hearty menu options, with fresh raw bar items available as well.

A towering pork shank beside a heap of slaw on a curved ceramic plate on a wooden table
Corned pork shank with gruyere potato puree, cabbage, apple, and puffed farro
Mountain Standard [Facebook]

Sweet Basil

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Opened in 1977, Sweet Basil is a fine dining institution that’s endured Vail’s evolution for a reason. Lunch and dinner focus on refined regional ingredients; first bites might include a winter mushroom salad and rabbit steamed bun, while larger plates might feature juniper-rubbed venison loin, wagyu from Snake River Farms, and Iberian duroc pork chop with honey bourbon glaze. Reservations are required for evenings and are often booked out a month in advance, but you can always try to score a seat at the bar, which is first-come, first-serve.

A cut of meat topped with mustard seeds, presented with a rectangular puck of potato.
Venison loin with butternut squash pave, pickled mustard seeds, and huckleberry glace.
Sara Rebeka LTD

Root & Flower

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This cozy, chic spot is worth seeking out for a drink before or after dinner — although the veteran kitchen crew does prepare tasty small plates that make an excellent après-ski meal. In addition to a superb wine list (50 pours by the glass), Root & Flower has an extensive menu of draft beers and craft cocktails. Drinkers should work their way through the menus, divvied up into four categories: underappreciated & misunderstood, pretty & pink, slow & serious, and rustic & complex.

A plate of grilled calamari and grilled bread, with charred lemon halves, with bright flowers in the background
Grilled calamari
Root & Flower [Facebook]

Slope Room

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As the in-house restaurant and bar of Gravity Haus — an uber-cool collection of community-forward base camps in multiple mountain towns — the Slope Room offers breakfast, lunch, après ski, and dinner, focused on sustainable protein and produce sourced from Rocky Mountain farmers and ranchers. The sleek, modern steakhouse, just off the lobby, celebrates the spirit of the Old West, including a lively bar that mixes up killer cocktails.

A fancy charred bratwurst with bright toppings in a toasted bun on a clean white plate
Elk bratwurst in a pretzel bun with onion mostarda, bacon braised cabbage, and beer cheese 
Slope Room [Facebook]

Wyld

The luxurious Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch resort is tucked away in an exclusive enclave of Beaver Creek, and it’s worth a winding detour up the mountain road for a meal at the hotel’s signature restaurant. Executive chef Jasper Schneider — who also oversees in-house restaurants Sakaba and Buffalos — channels bold cooking techniques, local produce, and hyper-seasonal flavors for lunch and dinner. On weekends, there’s live music on the sprawling deck during lunch and inside during dinner.

A high-ceilinged dining room with white-upholstered chairs around wood tables set for a meal, large windows to one side, and a large artwork on the far wall.
The dining room at Wyld.
Wyld

Mirabelle

Hidden behind the grand gatehouse of Beaver Creek lies a quaint farmhouse that’s home not only to a bustling French-style bistro but also to chef Daniel Joly, who lives upstairs with his family. A master chef from Belgium, Joly presents European classics with an alpine spin in a candlelit dining room. A special occasion calls for the four-course tasting menu, which features tuna sashimi, sauteed Maine lobster, roasted duck, and a symphony of desserts. A la carte menu standouts include the imported Ossetra caviar service, Alaska sablefish, North Sea dover sole menunière, Colorado farm-raised rack of lamb, and elk tenderloin. You can add seared foie gras to any entree for a fee.

A white-washed dining room decorated with farming and cooking equipment.
The dining room at Mirabelle.
Dominique Taylor/Mirabelle

Vin 48

This wine bar is the perfect pre-dinner pit stop, offering a daily happy hour with the best value on wines by the glass. But after a round of drinks, you may just want to stick around for some seasonal small plates. Items like Colorado bison tartare and crispy Berkshire pork ribs are great for groups, while pan-seared Colorado striped bass and Reminisce ranch beef tenderloin fill out the mains. For dessert, try the orange-thyme Grand Marnier creme brulee.

A dish covered in drizzles of sauce and chopped herbs.
A dish worth sticking around for at Vin 48.
Vin48

Splendido at the Chateau

Crystal chandeliers, a piano bar, and an open kitchen make for a dramatic and romantic dinner setting inside the gorgeous Chateau Beaver Creek guest lodge. The elegant, white-tablecloth service starts with seafood towers, smoked ham consomme, and Petrossian caviar, followed by sophisticated specialties like swordfish au poivre, Colorado lamb rack, and Long Island duck. And don’t forget to save room for a pillowy lemon or chocolate souffle for dessert.

Two lamb chops on a plate with swirls of greens.
Lamb at Splendido.
Dominique Taylor

Minturn Saloon

Now under new ownership and fresh off an 18-month restoration project, Vail Valley’s oldest restaurant (built in 1901) is back and better than ever. It’s set in the historic mining town of Minturn, making it a perfect pitstop for anyone traveling between Vail and Beaver Creek, or a great place for a celebratory meal for off-piste skiers who’ve just completed the backcountry Minturn Mile run. The bar, once a secret gambling room, is still chock-full of memorabilia. It’s known for its award-winning margaritas, and musts on the food menu include a cup of posole or bison chili to start, followed by sizzling fajitas, birria tacos, and a pork cheek tostada for the table.

A close-up on saucy ribs with rice and a cheesy side dish blurred on the plate in the background.
Ribs with sides.
Minturn Saloon/Facebook

The Little Diner

Vail’s only all-day breakfast joint (if your day runs from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.) lives in Lionshead Village, where solo diners can snag a counter seat to try the caramelized onion, tomato, and Swiss crepe, a cottage cheese-filled blintz, or the Dutch-style pancakes. Family-owned and operated by Brian and Peggy Little, the place makes everything from scratch. A lunch menu is also available.

A restaurant exterior with a hanging sign advertising the Little Diner.
Outside the Little Diner.
Little Diner/Facebook

Annapurna

Nepali and Indian cuisine are Himalayan highlights at this Mount Everest-inspired canteen inside the Evergreen Lodge at Vail. Naan fresh from the clay oven and steaming plates of paneer, masala, and curry go best with a cup of cheeya (black tea brewed with milk and Nepali spices) after a long day on the slopes.

Chasing Rabbits

What was once a movie theater and restaurant that anchored the Solaris complex (RIP CineBistro’s Colorado locations) is now home to a massive social club with multisensory experiences. There’s a speakeasy, screening room, nightclub, arcade, and restaurant — all decked out in an Alice in Wonderland theme. While members do get access to VIP events, secret menus, liquor lockers, and reservations, this swanky social club welcomes the public, too. Build an entire evening around dinner, which consists of modern Mediterranean cuisine like salmon crudo, whole grilled branzino, and braised rabbit bolognese.

A trio of dishes, including some sort of chicken, a pilaf, and a green soup.
Dishes at Chasing Rabbits.
Chasing Rabbits

Vintage

You can momentarily escape Vail Village for a quick jaunt to Paris inside this French cafe, which serves traditional brasserie fare, including baked brie, escargot, beef bourguignon, and steak frites. The walls, adorned with posters and antiques, make a perfect backdrop for the food, especially if you go for the decadent Champagne brunch on the weekend.

A stack of two thick French toast slices topped with mascarpone cream, a bacon slice, and berry compote, surrounded by table settings and brunch cocktails.
Huckleberry bacon French toast.
David Gillette Photography

Osaki’s

The valley’s fresh sushi options range from the splurge-worthy Matsuhisa to the solid, affordable Joy, but for something especially intimate, head to Osaki’s. Chef Takeshi Osaki learned the skill of sushi-making from his grandfather in Osaka, and he trained at Nobu’s Aspen outpost before opening his own spot in the heart of Vail Village. Opt for the Omakase Nigiri (eight pieces) or the Omakase Anything, a fuller spread of sushi and signature dishes.

Alpenrose

This family-owned European restaurant and patisserie has been a charmer since 1974 (though in 2018, the proprietors of the neighboring German restaurant, Almresi, took over the Vail favorite). Alpenrose’s menu of elevated Old World staples — like raclette, schnitzel, spätzle, and zwiebelkuchen (onion pie) — is best washed down with a big mug of Bavarian beer.

A bright dining room with plain wood tables and chairs (lined with furs) and decorative pendant lights.
The dining room at Alpenrose.
Alpenrose

La Nonna Ristorante Vail

When La Nonna Ristorante replaced Campo de Fiori, longtime chef Simone Reatti remained through the overhaul, eventually becoming a co-owner. Growing up in Cortina d’Ampezzo, he learned to cook from his nonna, whom he honors through a menu of rustic Italian cuisine. Dinner features Reatti’s favorites from his native village in the Dolomites, including fresh pasta made daily (using Molini Pivetti flour from Italy).

A plate of fresh pasta with herbs and meat.
Fresh pasta at La Nonna.
La Nonna Ristorante Vail

Matsuhisa

One of three Colorado locations (along with Aspen and Denver) of the famed LA-based Matsuhisa empire shows off sushi at its finest from renowned Japanese chef Nobu Matsuhisa. The high-ceilinged hot spot offers a panoramic view of Vail Mountain and a patio (if it’s warm enough) inside the Solaris complex. For the ultimate dining experience, let the chef be your guide through the omakase menu — especially if that chef is Matushisa himself on one of the coveted “Nobu in Town” nights during the high season, when the master himself is behind the bar crafting signature dishes, schmoozing with guests, and signing cookbooks.

A high-ceilinged dining room with long tables set with red chairs and a bar bearing sake bottles.
The grand interior of Matsuhisa.
Matsuhisa

La Tour Restaurant & Bar

This French-influenced bistro brings inventive dishes to guests, and the team prides itself on first-class hospitality and a fabulous wine list. The highlights are the truffle French onion soup, wild Burgundy escargot, imported Hokkaido jumbo sea scallops, and crispy panko chicken paillard.

Mountain Standard

While this restaurant’s 40-year-old sister spot, Sweet Basil, is still the toughest reservation in Vail, try downstairs sibling Mountain Standard for its unfussy gastropub atmosphere. Bone marrow and wagyu carpaccio, wedge salad, and rotisserie chicken are among the comforting and hearty menu options, with fresh raw bar items available as well.

A towering pork shank beside a heap of slaw on a curved ceramic plate on a wooden table
Corned pork shank with gruyere potato puree, cabbage, apple, and puffed farro
Mountain Standard [Facebook]

Related Maps

Sweet Basil

Opened in 1977, Sweet Basil is a fine dining institution that’s endured Vail’s evolution for a reason. Lunch and dinner focus on refined regional ingredients; first bites might include a winter mushroom salad and rabbit steamed bun, while larger plates might feature juniper-rubbed venison loin, wagyu from Snake River Farms, and Iberian duroc pork chop with honey bourbon glaze. Reservations are required for evenings and are often booked out a month in advance, but you can always try to score a seat at the bar, which is first-come, first-serve.

A cut of meat topped with mustard seeds, presented with a rectangular puck of potato.
Venison loin with butternut squash pave, pickled mustard seeds, and huckleberry glace.
Sara Rebeka LTD

Root & Flower

This cozy, chic spot is worth seeking out for a drink before or after dinner — although the veteran kitchen crew does prepare tasty small plates that make an excellent après-ski meal. In addition to a superb wine list (50 pours by the glass), Root & Flower has an extensive menu of draft beers and craft cocktails. Drinkers should work their way through the menus, divvied up into four categories: underappreciated & misunderstood, pretty & pink, slow & serious, and rustic & complex.

A plate of grilled calamari and grilled bread, with charred lemon halves, with bright flowers in the background
Grilled calamari
Root & Flower [Facebook]

Slope Room

As the in-house restaurant and bar of Gravity Haus — an uber-cool collection of community-forward base camps in multiple mountain towns — the Slope Room offers breakfast, lunch, après ski, and dinner, focused on sustainable protein and produce sourced from Rocky Mountain farmers and ranchers. The sleek, modern steakhouse, just off the lobby, celebrates the spirit of the Old West, including a lively bar that mixes up killer cocktails.

A fancy charred bratwurst with bright toppings in a toasted bun on a clean white plate
Elk bratwurst in a pretzel bun with onion mostarda, bacon braised cabbage, and beer cheese 
Slope Room [Facebook]

Related Maps