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Diners enjoy meals at plastic tables on a busy street.
Diners at street vendors in Bangkok’s Chinatown.
Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

The 38 Essential Bangkok Restaurants

Fermented tofu noodles from a cantankerous street vendor, roe-encrusted crab leg lollipops at a Michelin-starred temple of gastronomy, and more great bites to try now in Thailand’s capital city

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Diners at street vendors in Bangkok’s Chinatown.
| Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

Many conversations in Bangkok invariably end up in debates over the merits of this or that noodle shop, where to get the best deep-fried pork rinds, and whether a good tom yum soup still really exists. This is because food — on par with music, dance, and art — is one of Thailand’s most celebrated cultural pursuits. Many Thais are fiercely protective of their cuisines and judge chefs and cooks by a high standard. To flourish in a city like Bangkok, a successful eatery must be truly very good.

The capital is undergoing a renaissance of sorts following the depths of the pandemic. Traditional hotspots in the central business district are starting to stir, while a renewed sense of life pervades some of the unlikeliest places: down the alleyways of Chinatown, in Thonburi across the Chao Phraya River from Bangkok, and on the eastward fringes of nonstop sprawl. From a cantankerous street vendor slinging traditional fermented tofu noodles to a Michelin-starred temple of gastronomy making fish roe-encrusted crab leg lollipops, an accurate blueprint to great dining covers every corner of the City of Angels.

Chawadee Nualkhair is a Bangkok-based food writer whose cookbook, Real Thai Cooking, will be out in 2023.

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Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Krua Khun Ein

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For a less rarefied taste of Southern Thailand than the impenetrable Sorn, look no further than this unassuming (air-conditioned) shack set on the outskirts of town. The menu is stuffed full of regional specialties like stir-fried malindjo leaves with egg, pork in shrimp paste with stink beans, and of course, gaeng tai pla (fermented fish organ curry). The kitchen presents as boldly flavored and ear-ringingly spicy a glimpse into Southern Thailand as is humanly possible without an actual plane ticket to Hat Yai. Note: The second branch, listed here, is superior to the first.

Or Tor Kor Market

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Think of this market as your go-to Thai food wonderland. Apart from a fresh produce section, the space also features cooked food and desserts you can try in the open-air food court. For central Thai cuisine, line up at the Samran Gaeng Thai stall, and follow up with a bowl of shaved ice. Other highlights include cooked seafood, pork satay, fresh durian, and mangoes. 

Sirin Wongpanit

Prik-Yuak

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A descendant of the now-defunct stall at the Chatuchak Weekend Market, Prik-Yuak now lives in comfy, air-conditioned digs on Pradipat Road, a part of town chock-full of under-the-radar cafes and bars. Despite the elevated setting, the kitchen has maintained its high standards when it comes to the food; the kanom jeen sao nam (rice vermicelli with fresh coconut milk), rice with shrimp paste, and even the simple kai pullo (five-spice pork belly and egg stew, a typical elementary school dish) are as good as ever.

Gaeng Pa Sriyan

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Gaeng pa (aka “jungle curry”), one of the spiciest dishes Thailand has to offer, has a deep, cult-like following, illustrated by the perpetually full tables at this culinary institution in the Dusit district that focuses intently on the delicacy. Here you get a whole roster of options for this fiery, coconut milk-free favorite; variations feature frog, snail, quail, and wild boar, alongside the more common chicken, beef, and fish meatball. Round out your meal with stir-fried catfish in chile paste and river snails stir-fried with green peppercorns and wild ginger. Finally, don’t miss out on the durian ice cream with sticky rice for dessert if you are a fan of the “king of fruits.”

Krua Apsorn

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Krua Apsorn has several locations around Bangkok’s more picturesque, old school neighborhoods, making it a great place to go for a hearty Thai meal while strolling around. The decadent crab omelet is an all-time favorite; round out an order with stir-fried crab with string beans and yellow chilies, river prawns with garlic, and a bowl of sour lotus stem and prawn soup. Do not skip the signature coconut sorbet for dessert. If you have a choice, try the Samsen Road location, where the chef herself, Pa Dang, spends the most time.

Kanom Beung Bang Mae Prapa

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Traditional Thai kanom bueang, or crispy crepes, look nothing like the typical street-stall crepes you will find in many areas of Bangkok. Mung bean flour creates a crispy shell, which complements a filling of sweet eggs, hand-grated young coconut, foi thong (egg floss), and candied persimmon. Savory filling options include dried shrimp, grated coconut, a pinch of makrut lime leaves, and shallot. Prepare for a wait because this is one of the few places that knows how to make its crepes perfectly crisp; fortunately, there’s a row of chairs for those who need to sit with their snack after standing in line.

Sirin Wongpanit

Hia Tai Kee 

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A charming old-school cafe that has been around for more than 60 years, the original Hia Tai Kee retains its vintage ambience, even after opening in multiple locations. Sip freshly brewed Thai-style coffees (served with condensed milk and complimentary Chinese tea) at round marble-top tables, or try one of the newer drinks like an iced latte. If you’re hungry, try the delightfully greasy Chinese Western breakfast of fried eggs and Chinese sausages cooked and served in a pan, which comes with kanom pang yad sai (stuffed bread) filled with Chinese sausage and butter.

Sirin Wongpanit

Likhit Kai Yang

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Located behind one of Bangkok’s former Thai boxing stadiums, Likhit specializes in grilled chicken. The deliciously scrawny birds are grilled until smoky and just short of dry (in a good way), and served with two dips that the owner, Boonkhem Silathulee, will encourage you to mix. A full menu featuring dishes such as papaya salad, laap, and sticky rice lends this place its northeastern accent.

Grilled chicken at Likhit Kai Yang
Austin Bush

Jib Kee

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Roast pork and duck are available just about everywhere in Bangkok. But once you’ve tried the versions at the century-old Jib Kee, you won’t want to go anywhere else. The pork is crispy and rich, the duck fragrant and meaty. Delicious food aside, eating at this open-air shophouse feels like living out a part of Bangkok history, replete with octogenarian servers and a similarly aged crowd of diners. Don’t forget to order the side of stewed duck soup to go with your rice.

Roast duck at Jib Kee
Austin Bush

Nai Hong Pan Fried Chicken Noodle

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Nai Hong is just a couple of woks set up in a decrepit, hard-to-find alleyway, but it does only one thing really, really well: kuaytiaw khua kai, a dish of wide rice noodles fried in lard over coals with chicken and egg. Ask the staff to score you a bottle of beer from the mini-mart nearby, and you’ve got yourself the classic Bangkok Chinatown meal.

The noodles at Nai Hong
Austin Bush

Nang Loeng Market

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This charming, buzzy, antiquated market is a time capsule of Bangkok 80 years ago. It’s also a great place for lunch. Inside, a loosely linked community of vendors and restaurants sell the kind of dishes — jewel-like desserts, rich curries, slightly sweet snacks, rare noodle dishes — that are getting harder and harder to find in the Bangkok of today.

Nang Loeng Market
Austin Bush

Kim Leng

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Don’t let the Chinese name fool you; Kim Leng is, in fact, a great place for homestyle Thai cooking. At the front, find ready-cooked food like chile pastes and crispy fried fish. But really, people come here for mee krob (crispy Thai vermicelli) plus the tom som with fish filets, hor mok (steamed fish cakes with curry), and winged bean salad with toasted coconut.

Sirin Wongpanit

Thipsamai

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If you’re willing to brave the lines, this long-standing eatery is the most famous — if not necessarily the best — place in Bangkok for phat Thai. Assert your Bangkok cred by ordering the version with “shrimp oil,” which is actually the rich fat from the shrimp’s head, and cut the richness with a bottle of fresh-squeezed orange juice.

Phat Thai at Thipsamai
Austin Bush

Jay Fai

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A one-star nod by the Michelin organization has made this once relatively quiet shophouse restaurant into one of the most famous eateries in Bangkok. It’s all about decadence here, with the seafood-packed stir-fries; immense, crab-stuffed omelets; and rich soups still prepared by owner Supinya Junsuta (nicknamed Jay Fai). These days, a visit requires waiting hours. Come as early as 10 a.m. to cut down on time spent glaring angrily at diners lingering over their meals.

A stir-fry at Jay Fai
Austin Bush

Kor Panich

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Kor Panich was once the go-to for the best sticky rice with ripe, sweet mangoes. Several decades later, there are now tons of choices in Bangkok, but the small shop remains an institution. Kor Panich at Prang Phuthorn mostly offers staples to go, but visitors can pop in just to enjoy the iconic mango sticky rice at the one and only table inside.

Sirin Wongpanit

Chote Chitr 

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A classic inside and out, Chote Chitr is a small eatery that has been around for almost a century among the preserved historic architecture of Prang Phuthorn. Run by the same family for three generations, it’s known for classic mee krob (crispy vermicelli) served with chicken and shrimp. Other popular dishes include the signature banana flower salad with coconut milk and toasted chilies, and the deep-fried grouper served with spicy mango salad. Chote Chitr is a fantastic place to enjoy the Rattanakosin-era wooden shophouse ambiance.

Sirin Wongpanit

Nataporn Ice Cream 

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Thai tropical fruits have been reborn in this small, vintage, and very charming ice cream parlor in the historic Prang Phuthorn area of old Bangkok. Nataporn Ice Cream serves flavors like durian, mango, coconut juice granita, combined with Thai-style toppings like candied palm seeds, candied yam, toasted peanuts, corn, red beans, and millet. Take a seat among the wooden furniture and enjoy the view of the historic community’s common courtyard.

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On Lok Yun

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Located on the outskirts of Bangkok’s Chinatown, On Lok Yun has become a famous backdrop for selfies with its wooden booths, cracking floor tiles, and stained walls. Visitors also snap plenty of pictures of the all-day old-style Western breakfast (think greasy plates of fried eggs, ham, and Chinese sausages). Another big draw is the restaurant’s signature fat-loaded, pillowy white bread, which can be ordered on the side with chunks of butter, condensed milk, and gaya, a sweet, egg-based spread.

Sirin Wongpanit

Ahmad Rosdee

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Although a handful of long-standing Muslim Thai restaurants have fallen by the wayside in the wake of COVID, this quiet restaurant on the side of a busy thoroughfare has continued to flourish. Well-regarded for its extensive halal menu and friendly service, Ahmad is particularly known for its goat biryani, spicy oxtail soup, and beef satay; however, a little-mentioned sleeper hit here is the mango sticky rice. To avoid the lunch rush, get here before noon.

Eathai delivers Bangkok’s best street food without the outdoor heat. This themed food court in the basement of the posh Central Embassy has become a favorite for its delicious variety, as well as its more affordable prices, air conditioning, and comfortable ambiance. Try the fish-ball noodles and the Vietnamese rice vermicelli with grilled pork, as well as the desserts and iced tea. Bangkok Bold Kitchen, recent recipient of a Michelin Bib Gourmand award and an offshoot from the Bangkok Bold Cooking School, holds court in the same space. 

Sirin Wongpanit

Nai Mong Hoi Thod

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Nothing epitomizes Thai Chinese cuisine like the eponymous specialty at this semi-outdoor, shophouse restaurant in Bangkok’s Chinatown: hoi thod, an eggy batter fried until crispy and topped with mussels. More experienced eaters will go with or suan, in which the batter is just barely set and topped with oysters, or maybe the or lua, which boasts a batter fried to crispy shards.

Hoi thod at Nai Mong Hoi Thod
Austin Bush

The Originals Mae On's Curry Over Rice at Saphan Han

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The somewhat unwieldy name belies this petite 50-year-old khao gaeng (curry rice) stall with a well-edited menu. There’s a section of stir-fries, including the popular catfish in chile paste, a section of curries, including the hard-to-find gaeng kii lek (cassia leaf curry), and a selection of chile dips. All are on offer by 7:30 a.m. in time for workers to drop by on their way to the office. While the deep-fried son-in-law eggs and salted egg yolk in pork-and-crab mince dazzle, the most popular dishes hands down are the simple salted pork and sweet pork.

A pile of saucy pork chunks.
Tons of pork at The Originals Mae On’s.
The Originals Mae On’s Curry Over Rice at Saphan Han

Sa-nguan Sri

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It’s not fancy and it doesn’t appear on international must-eat lists, but Sa-nguan Sri has been a local favorite for over four decades. Small, crowded, and a bit run down, this was the place where many of today’s celebrity chefs learned modern and traditional Thai recipes. Diners can reminisce about the old no-frills Thai way of eating while enjoying green curry with fish balls, kai palo (braised eggs and pork belly), and crispy fish preserves. From March until May, be sure to drop by for the gorgeous khao chae (Thai summertime rice).

Sirin Wongpanit

Tep Bar

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Tep Bar focuses on traditional Thai elements: There are live bands, drink lists composed of ya dong (Thai herbal-infused whiskeys) and cocktails with iconic Thai flavors, local craft beers, dishes, and snacks. And because it focuses so much on traditional Thai vibes and ingredients, the bar has become a favorite of residents and tourists.

Sri Trat

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Most Bangkok Thai restaurants excel in one or two dishes, so you rarely encounter a menu where every dish is a star. But good luck finding a single dud at this stylish place, which specializes in the herb-forward, seafood-focused cuisine of Bangkok’s eastern seaboard. Don’t miss the deep-fried fish, piled high with garlic and turmeric, or the assertively herbaceous stir-fry of chicken thighs and Siamese cardamom.

Crab curry at Sri Trat
Sri Trat Restaurant/Facebook

Nakorn Phochana

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The area around Sam Yan Market – known today for catering to nearby university students – used to be famous for its seafood restaurants. These grandes dames of cuisine were often helmed by Thai Chinese cooks with a talent for melding fresh Thai ingredients with Chinese cooking methods such as steaming and stir-frying. Most of the big names have since moved on to more glamorous neighborhoods, but Nakorn Phochana remains, churning out the same stir-fried curried crab, tom yum (spicy lemongrass) soup, and langoustine tails that first charmed diners 50 years ago. Look out for the restaurant’s version of fried rice with Chinese olives, studded with fresh chilies, cashews, and slivers of lime.

Nom Jit Kai Yang

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With great original recipes and a well-managed kitchen, Nom Jit Kai Yang is still the best place to go for a decent Isan meal. The selection of som tam (the famous papaya salad) represent the best of the classic preparations, from basic takes to more involved versions with Isaan’s famous pla ra (preserved fish).

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Charmgang Curry Shop

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In spite of its location in a dimly lit back alley, Charmgang (loosely translatable to “curry bowl”) has quietly gained a loyal following based on word of mouth over the past three years. Run by a trio of chefs who once worked under David Thompson at Michelin-starred Nahm, the menu — which changes every month — features Thai dishes that have been tweaked to evolve with the times. As a result, you get inventive appetizers like grilled scallop salad on rice crackers and an ever-evolving array of chile dips. Of course, the curries are reliably delicious.

A bowl of duck larb beneath a pile of crispy fixings, presented on a long tray with greens.
Duck larb.
Charmgang Curry Shop

Took Lae Dee 

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Took Lae Dee (literally “Cheap and Good”) is like Bangkok’s all-day diner. People come here to tuck into Thai, Asian, and Western food at all hours. It’s great after a night out or when jet lag leaves you craving something substantial, like a burger, fried rice with deep-fried chicken drumstick and egg, or pad kra praw (rice stir-fried with spicy meat and basil). Try to snag a seat at the counter with a view of the bustling open kitchen.

Sirin Wongpanit

Sam Lor

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Named after a traditional three-wheeled rickshaw, this tiny shophouse on Charoen Krung Road, run by husband-and-wife team Napol (Joe) Jantraget and Saki Hoshino, has made a big splash in the dining scene. Boasting a menu of kap klaem, Thai drinking favorites, Samlor offers both seasonal tasting menus and a la carte options featuring whatever is good in the market that day (chef Jantraget’s Thai-style omelet is a particular standout). Even better, chef Hoshino’s inventive dessert concoctions blur the edges between Thai, Japanese, and Western flavors (think matcha and sweet potato mille-feuille, or pink guava cake). Note: If you prefer the set menu, book ahead.

A mix of seafood presented in a shell on a bed of ice.
Seafood salad.
Sam Lor

Yen Ta Fo JC

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One of Bangkok’s most popular noodle dishes is yen ta fo, noodles in a slightly sweet broth, stained pink from the addition of fermented tofu and studded with fish balls. It’s available just about everywhere, but noodle aficionados know that the best version is at this streetside stall, where the cantankerous owner will tell you exactly where and how to sit (couples must not face each other).

Yen Ta Fo at the similarly named street stall
Austin Bush

Samrub for Thai

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Chef Prin Polsuk, formerly of Michelin-starred Nahm, has brought his encyclopedic knowledge of Thai food to this intimate chef’s table tucked away in a quiet neighborhood off of one of the city’s busiest streets. Styled after a Japanese kappo, chef Polsuk doles out creations based on whatever is fresh and local, while his wife Thanyaporn “Mint” Jarukittikun handles front-of-house duties and helps with menus. Also like a kappo, space is limited to a handful of counter seats, so reservations can be hard to get. There is no phone number, so make sure to message the team via its Facebook page for a prompt reply.

A handful of skewers on a plate with a wedge of lime.
Skewers at Samrub.
Samrub

Err Urban Rustic Thai

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Set up in the former location for the now-closed (and much-lamented) Soul Food Mahanakorn, culinary standby Err continues in the tradition of top-quality casual Thai drinking food spots. Helmed by Dylan Jones and Duangporn “Bo” Songvisava of the Food Trust (and formerly Bo.lan), Err churns out crowd-pleasing favorites like its Chicken Movie (chicken skin served with house-made Sriracha sauce) and Isan-style sausages, as well as traditional Thai tipples such as ya dong (an herbal Thai spirit) and sato (rice beer).

Skewers of grilled meat presented on a grate beside sauces and chopped fixings.
Skewered meats at Err.
Err Urban Rustic Thai

Taling Pling 

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Run by descendants of Thailand’s most famous cartoonist and columnist, the late Prayoon Chanyavongs, Taling Pling serves time-honored Thai family recipes in a modern, colorful house. While the restaurant has a few other locations in Bangkok, local connoisseurs prefer the original for namprik rong reur (chile paste with salted egg), stir-fried dok kajorn with eggs, lemongrass salad with crispy fish, rice vermicelli with coconut milk, and custard apple ice cream.

Sirin Wongpanit

Chef David Thompson’s latest venture takes his obsession with heritage Thai recipes of the 1900s to a new level. At Aksorn (meaning “alphabet”), he draws recipes from funeral books (printed to commemorate the deceased, detailing their lives and favorite dishes), with a particular focus on books memorializing well-known society ladies of the 1940s to 1970s. The restaurant seeks to capture a historical moment when Thai society — and its food — underwent a series of seismic shifts, as quality food spread from the kitchens of wealthy families to the masses. The setting is right on theme, on the top floor of the original Central Department Store, which opened in 1950 and has since become a mixed-use behemoth.

A closeup on a bowl of curry dotted with peas.
Curry at Aksorn.
Aksorn

Mae Waree Mango Sticky Rice

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Probably the only place in Bangkok that can satisfy a craving for mango and sticky rice 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, Mae Waree is the first thing you see when you turn the corner into the busy Soi Thonglor area. For convenience, buy a ready-to-eat set (peeled whole mango and a small serving of sticky rice, plus coconut cream) for 130 baht (about $3.40). There are a handful of other Thai desserts — kanom chan, egg flosses, sticky rice with banana — on the shelves as well.

Sirin Wongpanit

Authors' Lounge

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If you are looking for an unmatched teatime experience, book a table on the covered veranda of the historic Authors’ Lounge at the Mandarin Oriental Bangkok. Visiting writers who have stayed at the hotel over the decades — Somerset Maugham, Joseph Conrad, James Michener, Noel Coward — are immortalized with memorabilia in this frequently photographed space. Three sets of afternoon teas, served with tiers of finger foods, are available. Be sure to try the homemade scones served with clotted cream and rose petal jam.

Sirin Wongpanit

Out of all of the high-end Thai restaurants in Bangkok, Sorn may be the buzziest, thanks to its two Michelin stars and place on the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list. But even before the restaurant won international plaudits, chef Supaksorn “Ice” Jongsiri had been packing his 20-seat restaurant daily, luring Thais with innovative five-course sharing menus centered on the cuisine of his native Southern Thailand. Although the menus change on a seasonal basis, the Gems on Crab Stick — a steamed jumbo crab leg dipped in crab roe and chile paste – remains a perennial favorite. International travelers need to email the restaurant to make a reservation; after Sorn began receiving reservations months out, the team limited bookings to one month in advance, adding to the restaurant’s reputation as one of Bangkok’s toughest tables to land.

Krua Khun Ein

For a less rarefied taste of Southern Thailand than the impenetrable Sorn, look no further than this unassuming (air-conditioned) shack set on the outskirts of town. The menu is stuffed full of regional specialties like stir-fried malindjo leaves with egg, pork in shrimp paste with stink beans, and of course, gaeng tai pla (fermented fish organ curry). The kitchen presents as boldly flavored and ear-ringingly spicy a glimpse into Southern Thailand as is humanly possible without an actual plane ticket to Hat Yai. Note: The second branch, listed here, is superior to the first.

Or Tor Kor Market

Think of this market as your go-to Thai food wonderland. Apart from a fresh produce section, the space also features cooked food and desserts you can try in the open-air food court. For central Thai cuisine, line up at the Samran Gaeng Thai stall, and follow up with a bowl of shaved ice. Other highlights include cooked seafood, pork satay, fresh durian, and mangoes. 

Sirin Wongpanit

Prik-Yuak

A descendant of the now-defunct stall at the Chatuchak Weekend Market, Prik-Yuak now lives in comfy, air-conditioned digs on Pradipat Road, a part of town chock-full of under-the-radar cafes and bars. Despite the elevated setting, the kitchen has maintained its high standards when it comes to the food; the kanom jeen sao nam (rice vermicelli with fresh coconut milk), rice with shrimp paste, and even the simple kai pullo (five-spice pork belly and egg stew, a typical elementary school dish) are as good as ever.

Gaeng Pa Sriyan

Gaeng pa (aka “jungle curry”), one of the spiciest dishes Thailand has to offer, has a deep, cult-like following, illustrated by the perpetually full tables at this culinary institution in the Dusit district that focuses intently on the delicacy. Here you get a whole roster of options for this fiery, coconut milk-free favorite; variations feature frog, snail, quail, and wild boar, alongside the more common chicken, beef, and fish meatball. Round out your meal with stir-fried catfish in chile paste and river snails stir-fried with green peppercorns and wild ginger. Finally, don’t miss out on the durian ice cream with sticky rice for dessert if you are a fan of the “king of fruits.”

Krua Apsorn

Krua Apsorn has several locations around Bangkok’s more picturesque, old school neighborhoods, making it a great place to go for a hearty Thai meal while strolling around. The decadent crab omelet is an all-time favorite; round out an order with stir-fried crab with string beans and yellow chilies, river prawns with garlic, and a bowl of sour lotus stem and prawn soup. Do not skip the signature coconut sorbet for dessert. If you have a choice, try the Samsen Road location, where the chef herself, Pa Dang, spends the most time.

Kanom Beung Bang Mae Prapa

Traditional Thai kanom bueang, or crispy crepes, look nothing like the typical street-stall crepes you will find in many areas of Bangkok. Mung bean flour creates a crispy shell, which complements a filling of sweet eggs, hand-grated young coconut, foi thong (egg floss), and candied persimmon. Savory filling options include dried shrimp, grated coconut, a pinch of makrut lime leaves, and shallot. Prepare for a wait because this is one of the few places that knows how to make its crepes perfectly crisp; fortunately, there’s a row of chairs for those who need to sit with their snack after standing in line.

Sirin Wongpanit

Hia Tai Kee 

A charming old-school cafe that has been around for more than 60 years, the original Hia Tai Kee retains its vintage ambience, even after opening in multiple locations. Sip freshly brewed Thai-style coffees (served with condensed milk and complimentary Chinese tea) at round marble-top tables, or try one of the newer drinks like an iced latte. If you’re hungry, try the delightfully greasy Chinese Western breakfast of fried eggs and Chinese sausages cooked and served in a pan, which comes with kanom pang yad sai (stuffed bread) filled with Chinese sausage and butter.

Sirin Wongpanit

Likhit Kai Yang

Located behind one of Bangkok’s former Thai boxing stadiums, Likhit specializes in grilled chicken. The deliciously scrawny birds are grilled until smoky and just short of dry (in a good way), and served with two dips that the owner, Boonkhem Silathulee, will encourage you to mix. A full menu featuring dishes such as papaya salad, laap, and sticky rice lends this place its northeastern accent.

Grilled chicken at Likhit Kai Yang
Austin Bush

Jib Kee

Roast pork and duck are available just about everywhere in Bangkok. But once you’ve tried the versions at the century-old Jib Kee, you won’t want to go anywhere else. The pork is crispy and rich, the duck fragrant and meaty. Delicious food aside, eating at this open-air shophouse feels like living out a part of Bangkok history, replete with octogenarian servers and a similarly aged crowd of diners. Don’t forget to order the side of stewed duck soup to go with your rice.

Roast duck at Jib Kee
Austin Bush

Nai Hong Pan Fried Chicken Noodle

Nai Hong is just a couple of woks set up in a decrepit, hard-to-find alleyway, but it does only one thing really, really well: kuaytiaw khua kai, a dish of wide rice noodles fried in lard over coals with chicken and egg. Ask the staff to score you a bottle of beer from the mini-mart nearby, and you’ve got yourself the classic Bangkok Chinatown meal.

The noodles at Nai Hong
Austin Bush

Nang Loeng Market

This charming, buzzy, antiquated market is a time capsule of Bangkok 80 years ago. It’s also a great place for lunch. Inside, a loosely linked community of vendors and restaurants sell the kind of dishes — jewel-like desserts, rich curries, slightly sweet snacks, rare noodle dishes — that are getting harder and harder to find in the Bangkok of today.

Nang Loeng Market
Austin Bush