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Boats sit in a harbor with a green dome in the distance
The harbor in Akko
Corinna Kern

The 16 Essential Restaurants in Akko, Israel

Where to find endless variations of hummus, a perfect old-fashioned spice shop, and crunchy kanafeh in Israel’s ancient port city

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The harbor in Akko
| Corinna Kern

Skirting the Mediterranean coast just over an hour northwest of Tel Aviv, this ancient Israeli port city goes by many names — Akko (Hebrew), Acre (English), or Akka (Arabic). Winding streets of cobblestone weave through a majestic old city that earned UNESCO World Heritage Site status in 2001 thanks to its millennia-old walls, fortresses, castles, mosques, and synagogues.

The culture of Akko is a complex tapestry of Jewish and Arabic, Muslim, Christian, and Bahá’í influences, and unique to Israel. Unlike much of the country, where divergent ethnic and religious groups exist alongside — but still largely separate from — one another, the lives of those in Akko, with their varied backgrounds and faiths, are more peacefully intertwined. One clear beneficiary of this convergence is the food scene, which erupts on seemingly every corner.

Here, find coffee spiked with cardamom and the Yemenite mixed hawaij spice blend, endless international variations on hummus, and seafood dropped on your plate direct from the sea. Peerless eating takes place on every level, from walk-up bakeries selling sweet kanafeh pastries dripping with syrup, to one of Israel’s most acclaimed restaurants, Uri Buri, whose famed bearded chef shows off his lifelong obsession with the ocean. Olives, dates, tahini, za’atar, fresh fish, and rare herbs all come together in this endlessly walkable city, where past meets present, and sea meets earth. One tip: Call to ensure restaurants are open on Friday nights and Saturdays, and which if any dietary traditions they observe.

Editor’s Note: Eater is not updating international maps at this time given disruptions to global travel during the COVID-19 crisis.

Prices per person, excluding alcohol:
$ = Less than 55 shekels (Less than $15 USD)
$$ = 55 - 139 shekels ($16 - $39 USD)
$$$ = 140 - 230 shekels ($40 - $66 USD)
$$$$ = 231 shekels ($66 USD and up)

Keren Brown has been writing about food for the last 15 years. She is the author of the Food Lovers’ Guide to Seattle and is currently based in Tel Aviv, where she writes for local and international publications.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Hummus Al-Abed Abu Hamid

Copy Link
Acre, under Lighthouse in old city
Akko, Israel
050-659-3985

It wouldn’t be fair to call this a mere hummus place. Chef-owner Arin Abu-Hamid Kurdi was raised in Akko, and in her cozy restaurant she shares the food she grew up on. That includes a particularly light and airy hummus, the result of using less tahini than most, and less baking soda when cooking the chickpeas. Ask the chef to guide you or opt for any of the home-cooked dishes. Just be sure not to miss the treedi, a dish of crusty pita slices covered with hot chickpeas, garlic, fresh yogurt, slivered almonds, and parsley. According to legend, this was Muhammad’s favorite food, and it continues to be a classic dish in Akko homes to eat during Iftar, the sunset meal that breaks the fast after Ramadan. While you are there, peruse On the Hummus Route, a book the chef is featured in, which showcases the best hummus from nine Middle Eastern cities. [$]

A wooden bowl full of yogurt chock full of pita strips, parsley, and other fixings on a deep blue background
Treedi (pita slices and chickpeas in yogurt)
Keren Brown

2. Uri Buri

Copy Link
Ha-Hagana St
Acre, Israel
04-955-2212

The whole country has heard of Uri Buri and Uri Jeremias, the legendary white-bearded chef who has become synonymous with his famous restaurant; fans know him simply as Uri Buri. He opened this unpretentious fine-dining restaurant back in 1989, providing possibly the best seafood in Israel right in front of the ocean. The chef’s curiosity, which rivals that of Le Petit Prince, makes the food stand out. He is always questioning guests’ palates while using top-notch ingredients without unnecessary adornment, letting diners focus on the balance of flavors. Locals love dishes like sashimi salmon with wasabi sorbet or the mix of seafood atop ptitim, Israeli couscous. Vegan options are available as well. The tasting menu, priced at 220 shekels ($63), gives you course after course of surprisingly creative plates, quickly revealing why this restaurant is on every best Israeli restaurant list. [$$$]

A man with a long white beard in a short-sleeved button down sits at a set table in front of an exposed brick wall
Chef Uri Jeremias
Sarit Goffen

3. El Marsa

Copy Link
Talmi St
Acre, Israel

El Marsa is in an ancient Ottoman customs house dating back to 1210 located in the stunning Old Port. No matter where you sit, the turquoise water sparkles through the window. Along with partner Marwan Sawaed, chef Alaa Musa, who grew up in Akko before working at several Michelin-starred restaurants in Sweden, offers a nuanced cuisine of homey Arab food mixed with modern twists. Discover dishes such as kibbeh stuffed with a medley of seafood in lieu of meat. You can also enjoy mejadra rice with a heap of goat yogurt, or ceviche straight from the sea with a side of shanklish cheese, which resembles labneh. [$$$]

From above, a plate of kubbeh (croquettes) and salad on a white plate over a tablecloth
Kubbeh
Keren Brown

4. The Kurdi Spice Shop

Copy Link

Heaps of spices are common in the market of Akko, but this old-fashioned shop is one of the more atmospheric places to stock up. The interior is decorated with seashells and oceanic treasures, which hang alongside sealed glass bottles of vigorous spice blends. Marwan Kurdi, the half-Kurdish, half-Danish owner, seems to be a poet of spices, effortlessly reciting every mix and what to do with it. Locals know to get the ras el hanout, a combination of 12 “secret” spices including whiffs of cumin and coriander, or baharat, the local allspice, which is perfect for rice, chicken, kibbeh, and meats. Of course, locals flock here for the hard-to-find Madagascar cinnamon. Just don’t miss out on the sweet paprika with sun-dried tomatoes or the potent chai spiced with ginseng. [$]

A man weighs a plastic bag of spices on an old-fashioned scale with a scooper in his other hand as he stands in a shop full of bric-a-brac
Spices being weighed at the Kurdi Spice Shop
Hamudi Kurdi’s Spice Shop / Facebook

5. Kashash

Copy Link
The Old City
Akko, Israel
04-991-6125

Any visitor to Akko must indulge in some kanafeh, a crunchy, stringy pastry mixed with cheese and dripping with sweet syrup. Locals (nearly) unanimously agree that this old-school shop is the best place for pastries like baklava, date-filled maamoul cookies, circular tangles of kanafeh called bird’s nests, and the must-try Istanbul, a dense, sticky ball of nuts. Everything is made fresh in-house, so sneak a peek through the kitchen door in the back before picking up some treats to take home for your friends. [$]

Round stuffed pastries stack high in a pyramid in a display case with other sweets blurred in the background
A stack of sweet pastries
Keren Brown

6. Maadali

Copy Link
The Turkish Bazaar
עכו, Israel

Located in the whimsical Turkish Bazaar, a little art market packed with artisan shops and eateries, Maadali (which refers to a beloved matron in Arabic) is a tiny eatery with a few tables that serves home-cooked Arab food, including top-notch seafood and stellar vegetable dishes. Rising chef Adnan Daher sources all the ingredients from the surrounding market. With the young, creative talent heading the show, all you have to do is sit back and take in the incredible tastes from his childhood kitchen. The waraq dwali (stuffed grape leaves) are a must. [$$]

From above, a metal dish of knafeh (pastry made of crunchy noodles), with a brown crust on top broken by a spoon laying in the dish, with two cherries on top, sitting on a table beside a small glass of wine
Knafeh
Afik Gabay

7. Mercato Restaurant

Copy Link
The turkish Bazaar, וייצמן 1
עכו, Israel

An Italian restaurant would typically stick out like a sore thumb in Akko, but Mercato seems to fit perfectly in the Turkish Bazaar, which dates back to the late 1700s. Cozy, warm, and intimate, this Italian-Israeli restaurant serves creative dishes from the tabun (clay oven). Mercato is run by a brotherly duo, chef Omri Shahar and Noam Shahar, who really know how to orchestrate a meal packed with calamari, shrimp, handmade pasta, wood-fired pizza, and Italian comfort food made with local ingredients. [$$]

A long wooden table filled with diners sits in a vaulted hallway with heavy wooden doors along the corridor
The communal table in the halls of the Turkish Bazaar
Mercato / Facebook

8. Breakfast at the Efendi Hotel

Copy Link
Louis HaTshi'i St
Acre, Israel

This boutique hotel, founded by the legendary Uri Buri, sits inside two ancient houses, which were combined over the course of an eight-year restoration. Since completion, it has breathed new life into the hotel scene in the area. Even if you are not staying at the hotel, it’s worth taking a tour and to try a diverse Akko breakfast at the hotel restaurant. The family-style feast brings all the guests together for a spread that changes according to the season. It features salads, homemade jams, fresh cheese, home-baked pita with za’atar, pastries, and various omelets (including a vegan option that swaps eggs for chickpea flour). The hotel includes an amazing terrace overlooking the city, a wine cellar for special events, and a stunning hammam. For the ultimate foodie escape, book a package including a room, massage, breakfast, and dinner at Uri Buri. [$$]

Inside a large hotel lounge with high vaulted, exposed brick ceilings, a large round chandelier, couches and chairs, and rooms visible through an open cut-out doorway and interior window
The historic vaulted ceiling of the Efendi Hotel
Assaf Pinchuk

9. Doniana

Copy Link
סאלח אלבסרי
עכו, Israel
04-991-0001

This restaurant has one of the best views in Israel. From the dining room or the outdoor terrace, you can really appreciate the sea, with the sunlight highlighting the dock where boats shift gently in the surf. Food is traditional and local. The menu features dishes like fried calamari, many different renditions of shrimp, meat dishes, and bountiful mezze that take up the whole table. [$$]

The facade of Doniana with large raised letter sign of the restaurant’s name, hanging above the restaurant patio with tables and closed umbrellas, and the sea just beyond the end of the patio
The patio of Doniana
Keren Brown

10. Humus Said

Copy Link
04-991-3945

If you want to start a conversation with anyone in Israel, ask about the best place to eat hummus. Many will tell you about Said, one of the oldest restaurants in the ancient quarter of Akko. As early as 6 a.m., the restaurant is already buzzing, with people eager to swirl onions in Said’s thick, warm hummus, which is rich but not too heavy. The local custom for eating hummus is lenagev, to wipe the hummus in a circular motion with an onion petal or pita. Just be ready to wait in line to do so. [$]

11. Hummus Abu-Souheil

Copy Link
Salah ad Din St. 14
עכו, Israel
04-981-7318

This is one of the most-loved hummus shops in town. Spearheaded by Souhila al-Hindi, whose father opened the restaurant in the 1960s, the kitchen cooks up the best meats and hummus toppings. But what really stands out here are the freshness and caliber of the ingredients. With the kitchen drumming out endless plates, you might think that al-Hindi would skimp on olive oil, but only the best touches her plates. [$]

12. Alto Dairy Farm

Copy Link
Shomrat
25218, Israel

This adorable kosher cafe and shop is located on a fruit orchard at Kibbutz Shomrat, roughly 2 miles from Akko. The family-owned operation is led by Ariel Mazan, a dairy farmer who is passionate about the health benefits and taste of goat cheese. Alto offers a comforting daily breakfast, plus sandwiches, quiche, and a huge variety of cheeses and yogurts to take home. Call to schedule a tour and get to know the cheese-making process from the inside. [$]

A lump of fresh gooey cheese sits in a sliced croissant on a bed of cooked greens with a small dish of sliced vegetables beyond it on a plate
Fresh gooey cheese on a croissant
Alto Dairy [Official Photo]

13. Michael Bistro

Copy Link
Ha-Gefen St 43
Liman, Israel

Chef Michael Gertofsky left the non-stop pace of Tel Aviv to open a bistro where he could cook from the fruits of the Galilee. The result is Michael Bistro in Liman, a moshav (cooperative farming community) about 20 minutes from Akko. This is one of Israel’s destination restaurants, a place that food lovers know will always live up to expectations. The pastoral vibe and the seasonal Galilean menu give you a true taste of Northern Israel, with lots of baladi (local and authentic) dishes. Discover lamb sweetbreads with sunchoke puree from the Josper (a Spanish charcoal grill), handmade pasta, or fresh calamari a la plancha, all presented with charm. [$$$$]

A broad bowl of slices of ceviche in oil with slices of vegetables and a slice of bread sitting on the rim
Ceviche with Turkish hearts of palm
Michael Bistro [Official Photo]

14. Hummus Shamsia

Copy Link
052-354-5829

There’s no reason to get into a dispute over the best place to eat in the market because every spot has its own unique charm. For falafel, try this compact hut, which serves what the locals call “balls of gold.” Known for its amber hue, the deep-fried specialty is crunchy and mild in flavor, with a more textured bite than most. Grab some falafel to go and eat as you browse the stunning Armenian ceramics at Paul Elias across the way. [$]

Six balls of falafel sit on a small plate on a bed of greens
Falafel, aka “balls of gold”
Hummus Shamsia / Facebook

15. Roots

Copy Link
Weizman St 1
Acre, Israel

Make your way to this enchanted garden in a gorgeous courtyard to find an ancient fortress-turned-restaurant. Born out of a collaboration between a Jew, a Muslim, and a Christian, Roots serves up kosher and modern Levantine food using hyper-local ingredients and high-quality meat, surrounded by green foliage, huge arches, exposed brick walls, and majestic vibes. Opt for the mini arais (fried pita triangles filled with lamb); beef carpaccio with greens, balsamic, and non-dairy Parmesan; mini kibbeh; and a colorful mezze spread of dips and salads. [$$$]

A long bright plate spread with beef carpaccio drizzled with sauce and a salad of greens, radishes and seeds
Beef carpaccio with greens
Keren Brown

16. Bader's Coffee World

Copy Link
Marco Polo St 25
Acre, Israel
97-972-52-664-2833

This coffee and spice market stall is run by Deeb Bader, a coffee roaster whose specialty is his riff on the traditional black version with cardamom or hawaij, a Yemenite mix of ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, and cloves. He roasts coffee from all over the world, giving you plenty of choices. Take your morning coffee as you peruse the market, or bring home some beans. And don’t leave without a huge bag of his za’atar, well worth its weight in gold. [$]

Woven baskets full of coffee beans with hand written signs stuck in each one listing where the beans come from as a man reaches in from the side of the picture
Coffee beans from all over the world
Keren Brown

1. Hummus Al-Abed Abu Hamid

Acre, under Lighthouse in old city, Akko, Israel
A wooden bowl full of yogurt chock full of pita strips, parsley, and other fixings on a deep blue background
Treedi (pita slices and chickpeas in yogurt)
Keren Brown

It wouldn’t be fair to call this a mere hummus place. Chef-owner Arin Abu-Hamid Kurdi was raised in Akko, and in her cozy restaurant she shares the food she grew up on. That includes a particularly light and airy hummus, the result of using less tahini than most, and less baking soda when cooking the chickpeas. Ask the chef to guide you or opt for any of the home-cooked dishes. Just be sure not to miss the treedi, a dish of crusty pita slices covered with hot chickpeas, garlic, fresh yogurt, slivered almonds, and parsley. According to legend, this was Muhammad’s favorite food, and it continues to be a classic dish in Akko homes to eat during Iftar, the sunset meal that breaks the fast after Ramadan. While you are there, peruse On the Hummus Route, a book the chef is featured in, which showcases the best hummus from nine Middle Eastern cities. [$]

Acre, under Lighthouse in old city
Akko, Israel

2. Uri Buri

Ha-Hagana St, Acre, Israel
A man with a long white beard in a short-sleeved button down sits at a set table in front of an exposed brick wall
Chef Uri Jeremias
Sarit Goffen

The whole country has heard of Uri Buri and Uri Jeremias, the legendary white-bearded chef who has become synonymous with his famous restaurant; fans know him simply as Uri Buri. He opened this unpretentious fine-dining restaurant back in 1989, providing possibly the best seafood in Israel right in front of the ocean. The chef’s curiosity, which rivals that of Le Petit Prince, makes the food stand out. He is always questioning guests’ palates while using top-notch ingredients without unnecessary adornment, letting diners focus on the balance of flavors. Locals love dishes like sashimi salmon with wasabi sorbet or the mix of seafood atop ptitim, Israeli couscous. Vegan options are available as well. The tasting menu, priced at 220 shekels ($63), gives you course after course of surprisingly creative plates, quickly revealing why this restaurant is on every best Israeli restaurant list. [$$$]

Ha-Hagana St
Acre, Israel

3. El Marsa

Talmi St, Acre, Israel
From above, a plate of kubbeh (croquettes) and salad on a white plate over a tablecloth
Kubbeh
Keren Brown

El Marsa is in an ancient Ottoman customs house dating back to 1210 located in the stunning Old Port. No matter where you sit, the turquoise water sparkles through the window. Along with partner Marwan Sawaed, chef Alaa Musa, who grew up in Akko before working at several Michelin-starred restaurants in Sweden, offers a nuanced cuisine of homey Arab food mixed with modern twists. Discover dishes such as kibbeh stuffed with a medley of seafood in lieu of meat. You can also enjoy mejadra rice with a heap of goat yogurt, or ceviche straight from the sea with a side of shanklish cheese, which resembles labneh. [$$$]

Talmi St
Acre, Israel

4. The Kurdi Spice Shop

Acre, Israel
A man weighs a plastic bag of spices on an old-fashioned scale with a scooper in his other hand as he stands in a shop full of bric-a-brac
Spices being weighed at the Kurdi Spice Shop
Hamudi Kurdi’s Spice Shop / Facebook

Heaps of spices are common in the market of Akko, but this old-fashioned shop is one of the more atmospheric places to stock up. The interior is decorated with seashells and oceanic treasures, which hang alongside sealed glass bottles of vigorous spice blends. Marwan Kurdi, the half-Kurdish, half-Danish owner, seems to be a poet of spices, effortlessly reciting every mix and what to do with it. Locals know to get the ras el hanout, a combination of 12 “secret” spices including whiffs of cumin and coriander, or baharat, the local allspice, which is perfect for rice, chicken, kibbeh, and meats. Of course, locals flock here for the hard-to-find Madagascar cinnamon. Just don’t miss out on the sweet paprika with sun-dried tomatoes or the potent chai spiced with ginseng. [$]

5. Kashash

The Old City, Akko, Israel
Round stuffed pastries stack high in a pyramid in a display case with other sweets blurred in the background
A stack of sweet pastries
Keren Brown

Any visitor to Akko must indulge in some kanafeh, a crunchy, stringy pastry mixed with cheese and dripping with sweet syrup. Locals (nearly) unanimously agree that this old-school shop is the best place for pastries like baklava, date-filled maamoul cookies, circular tangles of kanafeh called bird’s nests, and the must-try Istanbul, a dense, sticky ball of nuts. Everything is made fresh in-house, so sneak a peek through the kitchen door in the back before picking up some treats to take home for your friends. [$]

The Old City
Akko, Israel

6. Maadali

The Turkish Bazaar, עכו, Israel
From above, a metal dish of knafeh (pastry made of crunchy noodles), with a brown crust on top broken by a spoon laying in the dish, with two cherries on top, sitting on a table beside a small glass of wine
Knafeh
Afik Gabay

Located in the whimsical Turkish Bazaar, a little art market packed with artisan shops and eateries, Maadali (which refers to a beloved matron in Arabic) is a tiny eatery with a few tables that serves home-cooked Arab food, including top-notch seafood and stellar vegetable dishes. Rising chef Adnan Daher sources all the ingredients from the surrounding market. With the young, creative talent heading the show, all you have to do is sit back and take in the incredible tastes from his childhood kitchen. The waraq dwali (stuffed grape leaves) are a must. [$$]

The Turkish Bazaar
עכו, Israel

7. Mercato Restaurant

The turkish Bazaar, וייצמן 1, עכו, Israel
A long wooden table filled with diners sits in a vaulted hallway with heavy wooden doors along the corridor
The communal table in the halls of the Turkish Bazaar
Mercato / Facebook

An Italian restaurant would typically stick out like a sore thumb in Akko, but Mercato seems to fit perfectly in the Turkish Bazaar, which dates back to the late 1700s. Cozy, warm, and intimate, this Italian-Israeli restaurant serves creative dishes from the tabun (clay oven). Mercato is run by a brotherly duo, chef Omri Shahar and Noam Shahar, who really know how to orchestrate a meal packed with calamari, shrimp, handmade pasta, wood-fired pizza, and Italian comfort food made with local ingredients. [$$]

The turkish Bazaar, וייצמן 1
עכו, Israel

8. Breakfast at the Efendi Hotel

Louis HaTshi'i St, Acre, Israel
Inside a large hotel lounge with high vaulted, exposed brick ceilings, a large round chandelier, couches and chairs, and rooms visible through an open cut-out doorway and interior window
The historic vaulted ceiling of the Efendi Hotel
Assaf Pinchuk

This boutique hotel, founded by the legendary Uri Buri, sits inside two ancient houses, which were combined over the course of an eight-year restoration. Since completion, it has breathed new life into the hotel scene in the area. Even if you are not staying at the hotel, it’s worth taking a tour and to try a diverse Akko breakfast at the hotel restaurant. The family-style feast brings all the guests together for a spread that changes according to the season. It features salads, homemade jams, fresh cheese, home-baked pita with za’atar, pastries, and various omelets (including a vegan option that swaps eggs for chickpea flour). The hotel includes an amazing terrace overlooking the city, a wine cellar for special events, and a stunning hammam. For the ultimate foodie escape, book a package including a room, massage, breakfast, and dinner at Uri Buri. [$$]

Louis HaTshi'i St
Acre, Israel

9. Doniana

סאלח אלבסרי, עכו, Israel
The facade of Doniana with large raised letter sign of the restaurant’s name, hanging above the restaurant patio with tables and closed umbrellas, and the sea just beyond the end of the patio
The patio of Doniana
Keren Brown

This restaurant has one of the best views in Israel. From the dining room or the outdoor terrace, you can really appreciate the sea, with the sunlight highlighting the dock where boats shift gently in the surf. Food is traditional and local. The menu features dishes like fried calamari, many different renditions of shrimp, meat dishes, and bountiful mezze that take up the whole table. [$$]

סאלח אלבסרי
עכו, Israel

10. Humus Said

Acre, Israel

If you want to start a conversation with anyone in Israel, ask about the best place to eat hummus. Many will tell you about Said, one of the oldest restaurants in the ancient quarter of Akko. As early as 6 a.m., the restaurant is already buzzing, with people eager to swirl onions in Said’s thick, warm hummus, which is rich but not too heavy. The local custom for eating hummus is lenagev, to wipe the hummus in a circular motion with an onion petal or pita. Just be ready to wait in line to do so. [$]

11. Hummus Abu-Souheil

Salah ad Din St. 14, עכו, Israel

This is one of the most-loved hummus shops in town. Spearheaded by Souhila al-Hindi, whose father opened the restaurant in the 1960s, the kitchen cooks up the best meats and hummus toppings. But what really stands out here are the freshness and caliber of the ingredients. With the kitchen drumming out endless plates, you might think that al-Hindi would skimp on olive oil, but only the best touches her plates. [$]

Salah ad Din St. 14
עכו, Israel

12. Alto Dairy Farm

Shomrat, 25218, Israel
A lump of fresh gooey cheese sits in a sliced croissant on a bed of cooked greens with a small dish of sliced vegetables beyond it on a plate
Fresh gooey cheese on a croissant
Alto Dairy [Official Photo]

This adorable kosher cafe and shop is located on a fruit orchard at Kibbutz Shomrat, roughly 2 miles from Akko. The family-owned operation is led by Ariel Mazan, a dairy farmer who is passionate about the health benefits and taste of goat cheese. Alto offers a comforting daily breakfast, plus sandwiches, quiche, and a huge variety of cheeses and yogurts to take home. Call to schedule a tour and get to know the cheese-making process from the inside. [$]

Shomrat
25218, Israel

13. Michael Bistro

Ha-Gefen St 43, Liman, Israel
A broad bowl of slices of ceviche in oil with slices of vegetables and a slice of bread sitting on the rim
Ceviche with Turkish hearts of palm
Michael Bistro [Official Photo]

Chef Michael Gertofsky left the non-stop pace of Tel Aviv to open a bistro where he could cook from the fruits of the Galilee. The result is Michael Bistro in Liman, a moshav (cooperative farming community) about 20 minutes from Akko. This is one of Israel’s destination restaurants, a place that food lovers know will always live up to expectations. The pastoral vibe and the seasonal Galilean menu give you a true taste of Northern Israel, with lots of baladi (local and authentic) dishes. Discover lamb sweetbreads with sunchoke puree from the Josper (a Spanish charcoal grill), handmade pasta, or fresh calamari a la plancha, all presented with charm. [$$$$]

Ha-Gefen St 43
Liman, Israel

14. Hummus Shamsia

Acre, Israel
Six balls of falafel sit on a small plate on a bed of greens
Falafel, aka “balls of gold”
Hummus Shamsia / Facebook

There’s no reason to get into a dispute over the best place to eat in the market because every spot has its own unique charm. For falafel, try this compact hut, which serves what the locals call “balls of gold.” Known for its amber hue, the deep-fried specialty is crunchy and mild in flavor, with a more textured bite than most. Grab some falafel to go and eat as you browse the stunning Armenian ceramics at Paul Elias across the way. [$]

15. Roots

Weizman St 1, Acre, Israel
A long bright plate spread with beef carpaccio drizzled with sauce and a salad of greens, radishes and seeds
Beef carpaccio with greens
Keren Brown

Make your way to this enchanted garden in a gorgeous courtyard to find an ancient fortress-turned-restaurant. Born out of a collaboration between a Jew, a Muslim, and a Christian, Roots serves up kosher and modern Levantine food using hyper-local ingredients and high-quality meat, surrounded by green foliage, huge arches, exposed brick walls, and majestic vibes. Opt for the mini arais (fried pita triangles filled with lamb); beef carpaccio with greens, balsamic, and non-dairy Parmesan; mini kibbeh; and a colorful mezze spread of dips and salads. [$$$]

Weizman St 1
Acre, Israel

Related Maps

16. Bader's Coffee World

Marco Polo St 25, Acre, Israel
Woven baskets full of coffee beans with hand written signs stuck in each one listing where the beans come from as a man reaches in from the side of the picture
Coffee beans from all over the world
Keren Brown

This coffee and spice market stall is run by Deeb Bader, a coffee roaster whose specialty is his riff on the traditional black version with cardamom or hawaij, a Yemenite mix of ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, and cloves. He roasts coffee from all over the world, giving you plenty of choices. Take your morning coffee as you peruse the market, or bring home some beans. And don’t leave without a huge bag of his za’atar, well worth its weight in gold. [$]

Marco Polo St 25
Acre, Israel

Related Maps