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Two people pull slices from a large pizza topped with greens and cheese.
Pizza from Seu Pizza Illuminati.
Andrea Di Lorenzo/Eater

The 20 Best Pizzerias in Rome

From the world-famous pizza pockets at Trapizzino to third-wave pizza in teglia at Pizzarium to thick-rimmed, to Naples-style pies at Sforno, here’s where to eat pizza in Rome

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Pizza from Seu Pizza Illuminati.
| Andrea Di Lorenzo/Eater

Rome flies under the radar as Italy’s most exciting pizza destination. Sure, Naples has the clout and centuries-old pizza traditions, but what Rome lacks in history it more than makes up for in variety, quality, and flavor.

There are a few native styles in the Italian capital, all of which emerged in the 20th century. There are two notable varieties of pizza al taglio (by the slice), sold by weight to customers perched at high-top tables or standing in the street: pizza in teglia, which is baked in a pan and common in takeaway joints, and pizza alla pala, baked directly on the oven hearth and typically sold from bread bakeries. The city is also home to pizza tonda, an unsliced round with a crispy, chewy texture with barely any rim, which is typically served to seated customers with silverware. There are also Naples-inspired pizzerias serving soft, chewy, thick-rimmed pizza, plus a handful of pizzerias blending the styles of Naples and Rome, delivering crust with a little more crunch. Then there are all the other pizzerias where chefs are just serving whatever they want.

Regardless of where you enjoy your next slice, be sure to start your pizza meal as a Roman would, with lots of fried starters like supplì (rice croquettes), crocchette di patate (potato croquettes), fiori di zucca (squash blossoms filled with mozzarella and salted anchovies), and so many more crispy treats.

Katie Parla is a Rome-based food and beverage journalist, culinary guide, and award-winning cookbook author. She is the host of Katie Parla’s Rome and Katie Parla’s Roman Kitchen on Recipe.TV, and the co-host of the GOLA podcast about Italian food and drinks culture.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Pizzarium

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Via della Meloria, 43
00136 Roma RM, Italy

About 20 years ago, Pizzarium founder Gabriele Bonci launched Rome’s third-wave pizza in teglia style, embracing bread-making techniques, fanatical sourcing, and creative topping combinations — inspiring many other pizzerias to do the same. The high-hydration dough, which is subjected to a long, cold fermentation, is stretched into pans and topped with delectable combinations like braised artichokes, ribbons of guanciale, and a flurry of pecorino. It’s also tough to beat their classic flavors like rossa (tomato and oregano) or patate (buttery potatoes and mozzarella). Kick off your order with Pizzarium’s extraordinary fried items like polpette di bollito (croquettes made from tender beef), supplì alla carbonara (deep-fried spaghetti with guanciale, pecorino, and egg), and lasagna fritta (a cube of meat and bechamel-laced pasta layers). Prepare to queue; Pizzarium draws seemingly as many visitors as the Vatican nearby.

2. La Gatta Mangiona

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Via Federico Ozanam, 30-32
00152 Roma RM, Italy

At his pizzeria and trattoria in Monteverde, Giancarlo Casa blends the textures of Roman and Neapolitan styles to make thick-rimmed pizzas with crusts that are tender, chewy, and crispy all at once. Go for the southern-inspired broccoli rabe and sausage with smoked provolone, or the Roman classic capricciosa, a margherita with artichokes, olives, prosciutto, and a hard-boiled egg. There’s an extensive craft beer list and a nice selection of wine, whiskey, and grappa. And always start with fried starters like carciofi infarinati (artichokes, in season) and creatively seasoned supplì.

A chef stands by several full pizzas, including two prominent margheritas.
Pizzas from La Gatta Mangiona.
La Gatta Mangiona

3. Panificio Bonci

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Via Trionfale, 36
00195 Roma RM, Italy
06 3973 4457

A ten-minute walk from Gabriele Bonci’s landmark pizza al taglio shop, Pizzarium, this 10-year-old bakery serves pizzas in various forms alongside spectacular breads and pastries. Their alla pala style is joined by pizzette (small pizzas) made either from puff pastry (a perfect savory aperitivo snack) or leavened dough disks. The real standouts are the sandwiches filled with glorious mortadella or house-made porchetta between fragrant slices of spongy pizza bianca.

From above, hands grabbing slices of dough-topped pizza served on an illustrated menu.
Breaking up slices from Panificio Bonci.
Irene Mattacchioni

4. Seu Pizza Illuminati

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Via Angelo Bargoni, 10 - 18
00153 Roma RM, Italy

The 4-year-old Illuminati occupies a contemporary space in a 1970s apartment block near the edge of Trastevere, where the decor mirrors the modern approach to pizza embraced by pizzaiolo Pier Daniele Seu and his partner in business and in life Valeria Zuppardo. It’s one of the few places in town where tweezers and piping bags are used to finish pies, but the result is fresh, fun, and not at all precious. The twists on the classics are satisfying, like margherita arrosto featuring roasted tomatoes alongside tangy tomato sauce for a sweet and acidic contrast. Seasonal pies, like the maialino al bosco with porcini and sausage, look and feel more like composed dishes than pizza toppings, but are thoughtful and delicious nonetheless.

A pizza on a wooden paddle at the mouth of an oven where a fire burns brightly.
Pizza going into the oven at Seu Pizza illuminati.
Andrea Di Lorenzo/Eater

5. L’Elementare – Trastevere

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Via Benedetta, 23
00153 Roma RM, Italy

Mirko Rizzo has proven himself to be a Renaissance man of sorts in the pizza department. He first made his name at his excellent pizza in teglia shop Pommidoro in Centocelle and now has waded into pizza tonda territory at his newest venture, L’Elementare, in Trastevere. Rizzo’s style has always leaned heavily decadent, as demonstrated by pizza toppings like Porco Blu (chicory, capocollo, and blue cheese cream), but especially by his fried starters like cream-drenched, deep-fried tortellini and fried bricks of lasagna. Wash it all down with a palate-cleansing beer from the formidable list.

6. Forno Campo dè Fiori

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Campo de' Fiori, 22
00186 Roma RM, Italy

Like its nearby competitor Antico Forno Roscioli, Forno Campo dè Fiori is a classic bread bakery selling loaves, cookies, and jam tarts, though you should go for pizza alla pala. Staff chop slices from long slabs before weighing them and wrapping them up in brown paper to take away. There are few joys in Rome as pure as eating a slice of Forno Campo de Fiori’s fiori di zucca pizza on the cobblestones outside the shop while peering through the adjacent window, through which you can see jiggly lumps of dough being coaxed into five-foot long pizzas by the skilled pizzaiolo. If you show up mid-afternoon when the bakery closes temporarily, pop into Forno Campo dè Fiori’s annex across the alley for pizza con la mortazza (a mortadella sandwich made with their intensely and perfectly salty pizza bianca).

7. Trapizzino | Testaccio

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Via Giovanni Branca, 88
00153 Roma RM, Italy

Stefano Callegari invented the trapizzino at his pizza al taglio joint in Testaccio more than a decade ago. The triangular pizza pocket, filled with savory Roman secondi, proved so successful that he ultimately shuttered the pizzeria to open a dedicated Trapizzino shop in its place. There are now locations across Rome and the world. The name trapizzino is a play on words, joining tramezzino (a triangular white bread sandwich with the crusts removed) and pizza (the dough for the snack is naturally fermented pizza dough). Fillings range from central Italian classics like pollo alla cacciatora (vinegar-spiked dark meat chicken braised with herbs and garlic) to Roman staples such as picchiapò (beef simmered in a mildly spicy tomato sauce). The neighboring annex, seemingly open based on the staff’s whims, stocks a nice selection of wines from Lazio.

Two triangular trapizzino, one stuffed with saucy chicken, the other with a tomato-based sauce, in a metal stand.
Trapizzino with various fillings.
Andrea Di Lorenzo/Eater

8. Casa Manco

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Via Aldo Manuzio 66C Nuovo Mercato di Testaccio Box, 22
00153 Roma RM, Italy

Testaccio has one of the few markets in Rome where you can graze on prepared food (the others focus on selling ingredients rather than meals). Husband-and-wife team Paola Manco and Andrea Salabè opened Casa Manco there in 2017, and it quickly became one of the most appealing spots in a growing sea of dining options. The couple sells pizza alla pala, naturally fermenting their dough and proofing it for four days before stretching it into oblong discs. The substantial toppings are suited for the structurally sound base: zucchini flowers, salted anchovies, and stracciatella; guanciale, pecorino Romano, and black pepper; potato and mozzarella. The simplest offering, dough rolled in sesame seeds and then baked, has an ethereal texture and toasted flavor that is incredibly complex, in spite of its seeming simplicity. There is a second location on Via di San Cosimato in Trastevere.

A worker in gloves slices into a pizza on a wooden counter near a sunny window.
Slicing into the pizza alla pala.
Alessandro Felici

9. Ai Marmi

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Viale di Trastevere, 53-59
00153 Roma RM, Italy

Locals endearingly call Ai Marmi l’obitorio (“the morgue”) for its marble tables and walls, but the nearly century-old shop on Trastevere’s main drag remains an institution for wood-fired pizza tonda (you can just ignore the signage on the oven in 1960s typography declaring “pizza napoletana”). The flimsy, thin-crust pizzas are quintessential for the tonda style, generously overhanging their plates. Be sure to check out the lightbox above the bar that lists starters such as fagioli (beans), filetti di baccalà (battered cod filets), and supplì al telefono (rice croquettes promising a satisfying cheese pull).

10. Antico Forno Roscioli

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Via dei Chiavari, 34
00186 Roma RM, Italy

The super-central Antico Forno Roscioli isn’t actually as ancient as the name might suggest; the Roscioli family opened it in the 1970s. They dutifully make classic Roman baked goods, but the breads and cookies at the counter (however excellent) aren’t what draw thousands of customers daily. Queue up at the counter below the neon Roscioli sign to order the real draw, pizza alla pala, from the brusque staff. In the morning, there are a few simple choices like pizza rossa (bright and tangy tomato sauce), bianca (olive oil and salt), and patate (potato, with or without cheese), while the place transforms into a hectic cafeteria at lunchtime when more elaborate pizzas fill the counter. The classics are always the best, with a sturdy structure and a crispy, chewy texture that embodies the style’s platonic ideal.

Long slabs of uncut pizza, including one that’s all red sauce and another featuring cherry tomatoes.
Pizza alla pala from Antico Forno Roscioli.
Antico Forno Roscioli

11. Da Remo

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Piazza di S Maria Liberatrice, 44
00153 Roma RM, Italy

Don’t show up to this dinner-only Roman pizzeria between 8 and 10:30 p.m., or else be prepared to queue. Start with a few fritti and a plate of beans, followed by thin-crust pizza tonda, made in a wood-burning oven and sparsely topped. Surly servers dole out the consistently satisfying, simple pizzas like margherita and marinara, and there’s outdoor seating in the summer, a necessity considering the heat of the indoor pizza oven.

12. Pizzeria Ostiense

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Via Ostiense, 56
00154 Roma RM, Italy

Pizzeria Ostiense serves matzo-thin, super crisp, wood-fired pizzas. The owners are Da Remo alumni and when they migrated to the Ostiense district from neighboring Testaccio, they left the snark behind them and instead focused on providing efficient, reasonable, and friendly service. The menu features all the Roman pizzeria classics: beans, fried starters, Roman-style pies, and traditional desserts. There are also a handful of pasta dishes, though it’s the simple fritti and the economical, unpretentious pizza that keeps regulars coming back again and again.

Thin margherita pizza on a black background
Super crisp pie from Pizzeria Ostiense.
Pizzeria Ostiense

13. Piccolo Buco

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Via del Lavatore, 91
00187 Roma RM, Italy

There aren’t many restaurants near the Trevi Fountain (or frankly anywhere in Rome) that can say they work exclusively with local organic produce. In truth, they don’t have to; most of the neighborhood’s clientele don’t demand or expect it. That doesn’t seem to matter to pizzaiolo Luca Issa at Piccolo Buco, who hand-mixes his dough, shapes it with a thick rim, and adds cheeses, meats, and tomatoes sourced from small producers devoted to traditional agriculture. The result is pizza with a fragrant crust balanced with ingredients like sweet yellow tomatoes, milky buffalo mozzarella, savory anchovies, and salty olive powder and capers. Enhancing the pizzas further, Issa carefully selects an olive oil from his arsenal to complement, rather than weigh down, the toppings.

Someone pours olive oil onto a finished pizza with a thick rim.
Finishing the pizza with a drizzle of oil.
Piccolo Buco

14. Sbanco

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Via Siria, 1
00179 Roma RM, Italy

This pizzeria-pub near San Giovanni is another winner from Stefano Callegari, inventor of the trapizzino and force behind Sforno (also on this list) and Tonda. He teamed up with restaurateur Marco Pucciotti, and the duo recruited pizzaiolo Alessio Muscas to elevate their thick rimmed, Rome-meets-Naples, crispy yet chewy pizzas, baked up in a wood-burning Valoriani oven. One pie features wild fennel with chile-spiked cured pork loin, marinated mushrooms, and Parmigiano-Reggiano; another is the cacio e pepe pizza adorned with a thick blanket of pecorino Romano cheese and black pepper. Sbanco also serves meat dishes and creatively flavored supplì, as well as more than a dozen Italian craft beers.

15. I Quintili

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Via Eurialo, 7c
00181 Roma RM, Italy

Marco Quintili opened the second location of his hit pizzeria in Rome in July 2020, where he marries Neapolitan style with Roman flavors. Think: frittatine (Neapolitan pasta croquettes) flavored like cacio e pepe or amatriciana, and carbonara pizza made with grated cured egg yolk. The pizza dough is ethereal and — for Romans who judge food this way — extremely digestible. The temperature of the oven and longer-than-usual bake all conspire to make a pizza that holds its toppings without becoming soupy like too many Neapolitan pies. 

16. Pizzeria a Taglio Angelo e Simonetta

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Via Nomentana, 581
00141 Roma RM, Italy

Angelo e Simonetta is located in a residential block in Monte Sacro a few miles northeast of the city center. Angelo Iezzi’s pizzeria, which was founded in the ’80s, was among the first to experiment with the high-hydration, long-fermented dough techniques that now define Rome’s premier slice shops. The pizza in teglia is medium-thick, with a light structure and fragrant aroma, the perfect base for toppings like monk’s beard and gorgonzola cream, or Norcia prosciutto and creamy buffalo mozzarella curds. The pizza is great, but much of the appeal is that Angelo e Simonetta really just feels like a neighborhood slice joint; it’s filled with workers at lunchtime, kids after school, and university students at all hours.

17. A Rota Pizzeria Romanesca

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Via di Tor Pignattara, 190
00177 Roma RM, Italy

Restaurateur Marco Pucciotti and pizzaiolo Sami El Sabawy named their pizzeria for the Roman phrase “a rota,” meaning to consume something continuously. Diners take them up on it, again and again heading out to Tor Pignattara in eastern Rome for El Sabawy’s paper-thin pizza tonda. The pizzaiolo coaxes the low-hydration dough into a disk with a rolling pin, then cooks the pizza at a lower temperature for longer than usual, resulting in an incredibly crisp base for both classic and creative toppings. More inventive toppings change with the seasons, like April’s Sami Special: mozzarella, fennel gratin, Taggiasca olives, sundried tomato pesto, red onion gel, and fresh basil.

From above, a white pizza with long strands of zucchini flower and anchovies.
Pizza with anchovies and zucchini flowers.
Andrea Di Lorenzo and Giulio Di Mauro

18. 180g Grammi Pizzeria Romana

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Via Genazzano, 32
00177 Roma RM, Italy

180g Pizzeria Romana’s relatively new location just off Via Prenestina uses — you guessed it — 180-gram dough balls for its thin, crisp Roman style pizza. The dough is stretched by hand and topped with familiar favorites like margherita and marinara, but many of the pizzas push into creative territory with texture, flavor, and temperature contrasts, as in the Emporio with berbere-scented grass pea puree, sauteed chicory, beet chutney, and marinated Jerusalem artichokes. Starters include folded pizza bianca filled with mortadella. The original location in Centocelle remains open for takeout and delivery only.

Part of a full pizza on a black background. The pizza is topped with chorizo, peppers, and sorrel.
Chorizo di polpo pizza.
Coffee and Lucas_my mediastudio

19. Pro Loco DOL

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Via Domenico Panaroli, 35
00172 Roma RM, Italy

DOL, short for “di origine laziale,” celebrates the specialties from the region of Lazio (of which Rome is the capital). Proprietor Vincenzo Mancino has grown his locavore business from a single deli into several branches serving a full menu built completely from local ingredients. Over the past half dozen years, pizzaiolo Simone Salvatori has perfected the pizza at the Centocelle location, making the dough from organic flour and baking it in a pan in an electric oven. Toppings put products from Lazio on full display, including produce, cheeses, and cured meats.

A dining room with two tops set with tablecloths and settings for dinner. A large shelving unit in the back holds bottles of wine.
Inside Pro Loco DOL.
Pro Loco DOL

20. Sforno

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Via Statilio Ottato, 110/116
00175 Roma RM, Italy

Sforno draws faithful crowds near the historic Cinecittà studios on Rome’s southeastern edge. Diverging from the thin-crust Roman style, the pizzeria makes a thick-rimmed, Naples-inspired pie, topped with classic and creative ingredients. The signature toppings include the Greenwich (stilton and port reduction) and cacio e pepe (black pepper and grated pecorino Romano). Fried starters like fiori di zucca (fried battered squash blossoms filled with mozzarella and anchovy) and assorted supplì (fried rice croquettes) are still among the best in the game.

1. Pizzarium

Via della Meloria, 43, 00136 Roma RM, Italy

About 20 years ago, Pizzarium founder Gabriele Bonci launched Rome’s third-wave pizza in teglia style, embracing bread-making techniques, fanatical sourcing, and creative topping combinations — inspiring many other pizzerias to do the same. The high-hydration dough, which is subjected to a long, cold fermentation, is stretched into pans and topped with delectable combinations like braised artichokes, ribbons of guanciale, and a flurry of pecorino. It’s also tough to beat their classic flavors like rossa (tomato and oregano) or patate (buttery potatoes and mozzarella). Kick off your order with Pizzarium’s extraordinary fried items like polpette di bollito (croquettes made from tender beef), supplì alla carbonara (deep-fried spaghetti with guanciale, pecorino, and egg), and lasagna fritta (a cube of meat and bechamel-laced pasta layers). Prepare to queue; Pizzarium draws seemingly as many visitors as the Vatican nearby.

Via della Meloria, 43
00136 Roma RM, Italy

2. La Gatta Mangiona

Via Federico Ozanam, 30-32, 00152 Roma RM, Italy
A chef stands by several full pizzas, including two prominent margheritas.
Pizzas from La Gatta Mangiona.
La Gatta Mangiona

At his pizzeria and trattoria in Monteverde, Giancarlo Casa blends the textures of Roman and Neapolitan styles to make thick-rimmed pizzas with crusts that are tender, chewy, and crispy all at once. Go for the southern-inspired broccoli rabe and sausage with smoked provolone, or the Roman classic capricciosa, a margherita with artichokes, olives, prosciutto, and a hard-boiled egg. There’s an extensive craft beer list and a nice selection of wine, whiskey, and grappa. And always start with fried starters like carciofi infarinati (artichokes, in season) and creatively seasoned supplì.

Via Federico Ozanam, 30-32
00152 Roma RM, Italy

3. Panificio Bonci

Via Trionfale, 36, 00195 Roma RM, Italy
From above, hands grabbing slices of dough-topped pizza served on an illustrated menu.
Breaking up slices from Panificio Bonci.
Irene Mattacchioni

A ten-minute walk from Gabriele Bonci’s landmark pizza al taglio shop, Pizzarium, this 10-year-old bakery serves pizzas in various forms alongside spectacular breads and pastries. Their alla pala style is joined by pizzette (small pizzas) made either from puff pastry (a perfect savory aperitivo snack) or leavened dough disks. The real standouts are the sandwiches filled with glorious mortadella or house-made porchetta between fragrant slices of spongy pizza bianca.

Via Trionfale, 36
00195 Roma RM, Italy

4. Seu Pizza Illuminati

Via Angelo Bargoni, 10 - 18, 00153 Roma RM, Italy
A pizza on a wooden paddle at the mouth of an oven where a fire burns brightly.
Pizza going into the oven at Seu Pizza illuminati.
Andrea Di Lorenzo/Eater

The 4-year-old Illuminati occupies a contemporary space in a 1970s apartment block near the edge of Trastevere, where the decor mirrors the modern approach to pizza embraced by pizzaiolo Pier Daniele Seu and his partner in business and in life Valeria Zuppardo. It’s one of the few places in town where tweezers and piping bags are used to finish pies, but the result is fresh, fun, and not at all precious. The twists on the classics are satisfying, like margherita arrosto featuring roasted tomatoes alongside tangy tomato sauce for a sweet and acidic contrast. Seasonal pies, like the maialino al bosco with porcini and sausage, look and feel more like composed dishes than pizza toppings, but are thoughtful and delicious nonetheless.

Via Angelo Bargoni, 10 - 18
00153 Roma RM, Italy

5. L’Elementare – Trastevere

Via Benedetta, 23, 00153 Roma RM, Italy

Mirko Rizzo has proven himself to be a Renaissance man of sorts in the pizza department. He first made his name at his excellent pizza in teglia shop Pommidoro in Centocelle and now has waded into pizza tonda territory at his newest venture, L’Elementare, in Trastevere. Rizzo’s style has always leaned heavily decadent, as demonstrated by pizza toppings like Porco Blu (chicory, capocollo, and blue cheese cream), but especially by his fried starters like cream-drenched, deep-fried tortellini and fried bricks of lasagna. Wash it all down with a palate-cleansing beer from the formidable list.

Via Benedetta, 23
00153 Roma RM, Italy

6. Forno Campo dè Fiori

Campo de' Fiori, 22, 00186 Roma RM, Italy

Like its nearby competitor Antico Forno Roscioli, Forno Campo dè Fiori is a classic bread bakery selling loaves, cookies, and jam tarts, though you should go for pizza alla pala. Staff chop slices from long slabs before weighing them and wrapping them up in brown paper to take away. There are few joys in Rome as pure as eating a slice of Forno Campo de Fiori’s fiori di zucca pizza on the cobblestones outside the shop while peering through the adjacent window, through which you can see jiggly lumps of dough being coaxed into five-foot long pizzas by the skilled pizzaiolo. If you show up mid-afternoon when the bakery closes temporarily, pop into Forno Campo dè Fiori’s annex across the alley for pizza con la mortazza (a mortadella sandwich made with their intensely and perfectly salty pizza bianca).

Campo de' Fiori, 22
00186 Roma RM, Italy

7. Trapizzino | Testaccio

Via Giovanni Branca, 88, 00153 Roma RM, Italy
Two triangular trapizzino, one stuffed with saucy chicken, the other with a tomato-based sauce, in a metal stand.
Trapizzino with various fillings.
Andrea Di Lorenzo/Eater

Stefano Callegari invented the trapizzino at his pizza al taglio joint in Testaccio more than a decade ago. The triangular pizza pocket, filled with savory Roman secondi, proved so successful that he ultimately shuttered the pizzeria to open a dedicated Trapizzino shop in its place. There are now locations across Rome and the world. The name trapizzino is a play on words, joining tramezzino (a triangular white bread sandwich with the crusts removed) and pizza (the dough for the snack is naturally fermented pizza dough). Fillings range from central Italian classics like pollo alla cacciatora (vinegar-spiked dark meat chicken braised with herbs and garlic) to Roman staples such as picchiapò (beef simmered in a mildly spicy tomato sauce). The neighboring annex, seemingly open based on the staff’s whims, stocks a nice selection of wines from Lazio.

Via Giovanni Branca, 88
00153 Roma RM, Italy

8. Casa Manco

Via Aldo Manuzio 66C Nuovo Mercato di Testaccio Box, 22, 00153 Roma RM, Italy
A worker in gloves slices into a pizza on a wooden counter near a sunny window.
Slicing into the pizza alla pala.
Alessandro Felici

Testaccio has one of the few markets in Rome where you can graze on prepared food (the others focus on selling ingredients rather than meals). Husband-and-wife team Paola Manco and Andrea Salabè opened Casa Manco there in 2017, and it quickly became one of the most appealing spots in a growing sea of dining options. The couple sells pizza alla pala, naturally fermenting their dough and proofing it for four days before stretching it into oblong discs. The substantial toppings are suited for the structurally sound base: zucchini flowers, salted anchovies, and stracciatella; guanciale, pecorino Romano, and black pepper; potato and mozzarella. The simplest offering, dough rolled in sesame seeds and then baked, has an ethereal texture and toasted flavor that is incredibly complex, in spite of its seeming simplicity. There is a second location on Via di San Cosimato in Trastevere.

Via Aldo Manuzio 66C Nuovo Mercato di Testaccio Box, 22
00153 Roma RM, Italy

9. Ai Marmi

Viale di Trastevere, 53-59, 00153 Roma RM, Italy

Locals endearingly call Ai Marmi l’obitorio (“the morgue”) for its marble tables and walls, but the nearly century-old shop on Trastevere’s main drag remains an institution for wood-fired pizza tonda (you can just ignore the signage on the oven in 1960s typography declaring “pizza napoletana”). The flimsy, thin-crust pizzas are quintessential for the tonda style, generously overhanging their plates. Be sure to check out the lightbox above the bar that lists starters such as fagioli (beans), filetti di baccalà (battered cod filets), and supplì al telefono (rice croquettes promising a satisfying cheese pull).

Viale di Trastevere, 53-59
00153 Roma RM, Italy

10. Antico Forno Roscioli

Via dei Chiavari, 34, 00186 Roma RM, Italy
Long slabs of uncut pizza, including one that’s all red sauce and another featuring cherry tomatoes.
Pizza alla pala from Antico Forno Roscioli.
Antico Forno Roscioli

The super-central Antico Forno Roscioli isn’t actually as ancient as the name might suggest; the Roscioli family opened it in the 1970s. They dutifully make classic Roman baked goods, but the breads and cookies at the counter (however excellent) aren’t what draw thousands of customers daily. Queue up at the counter below the neon Roscioli sign to order the real draw, pizza alla pala, from the brusque staff. In the morning, there are a few simple choices like pizza rossa (bright and tangy tomato sauce), bianca (olive oil and salt), and patate (potato, with or without cheese), while the place transforms into a hectic cafeteria at lunchtime when more elaborate pizzas fill the counter. The classics are always the best, with a sturdy structure and a crispy, chewy texture that embodies the style’s platonic ideal.

Via dei Chiavari, 34
00186 Roma RM, Italy

11. Da Remo

Piazza di S Maria Liberatrice, 44, 00153 Roma RM, Italy

Don’t show up to this dinner-only Roman pizzeria between 8 and 10:30 p.m., or else be prepared to queue. Start with a few fritti and a plate of beans, followed by thin-crust pizza tonda, made in a wood-burning oven and sparsely topped. Surly servers dole out the consistently satisfying, simple pizzas like margherita and marinara, and there’s outdoor seating in the summer, a necessity considering the heat of the indoor pizza oven.

Piazza di S Maria Liberatrice, 44
00153 Roma RM, Italy

12. Pizzeria Ostiense

Via Ostiense, 56, 00154 Roma RM, Italy
Thin margherita pizza on a black background
Super crisp pie from Pizzeria Ostiense.
Pizzeria Ostiense

Pizzeria Ostiense serves matzo-thin, super crisp, wood-fired pizzas. The owners are Da Remo alumni and when they migrated to the Ostiense district from neighboring Testaccio, they left the snark behind them and instead focused on providing efficient, reasonable, and friendly service. The menu features all the Roman pizzeria classics: beans, fried starters, Roman-style pies, and traditional desserts. There are also a handful of pasta dishes, though it’s the simple fritti and the economical, unpretentious pizza that keeps regulars coming back again and again.

Via Ostiense, 56
00154 Roma RM, Italy

13. Piccolo Buco

Via del Lavatore, 91, 00187 Roma RM, Italy
Someone pours olive oil onto a finished pizza with a thick rim.
Finishing the pizza with a drizzle of oil.
Piccolo Buco

There aren’t many restaurants near the Trevi Fountain (or frankly anywhere in Rome) that can say they work exclusively with local organic produce. In truth, they don’t have to; most of the neighborhood’s clientele don’t demand or expect it. That doesn’t seem to matter to pizzaiolo Luca Issa at Piccolo Buco, who hand-mixes his dough, shapes it with a thick rim, and adds cheeses, meats, and tomatoes sourced from small producers devoted to traditional agriculture. The result is pizza with a fragrant crust balanced with ingredients like sweet yellow tomatoes, milky buffalo mozzarella, savory anchovies, and salty olive powder and capers. Enhancing the pizzas further, Issa carefully selects an olive oil from his arsenal to complement, rather than weigh down, the toppings.

Via del Lavatore, 91
00187 Roma RM, Italy

14. Sbanco

Via Siria, 1, 00179 Roma RM, Italy

This pizzeria-pub near San Giovanni is another winner from Stefano Callegari, inventor of the trapizzino and force behind Sforno (also on this list) and Tonda. He teamed up with restaurateur Marco Pucciotti, and the duo recruited pizzaiolo Alessio Muscas to elevate their thick rimmed, Rome-meets-Naples, crispy yet chewy pizzas, baked up in a wood-burning Valoriani oven. One pie features wild fennel with chile-spiked cured pork loin, marinated mushrooms, and Parmigiano-Reggiano; another is the cacio e pepe pizza adorned with a thick blanket of pecorino Romano cheese and black pepper. Sbanco also serves meat dishes and creatively flavored supplì, as well as more than a dozen Italian craft beers.

Via Siria, 1
00179 Roma RM, Italy

15. I Quintili

Via Eurialo, 7c, 00181 Roma RM, Italy

Marco Quintili opened the second location of his hit pizzeria in Rome in July 2020, where he marries Neapolitan style with Roman flavors. Think: frittatine (Neapolitan pasta croquettes) flavored like cacio e pepe or amatriciana, and carbonara pizza made with grated cured egg yolk. The pizza dough is ethereal and — for Romans who judge food this way — extremely digestible. The temperature of the oven and longer-than-usual bake all conspire to make a pizza that holds its toppings without becoming soupy like too many Neapolitan pies. 

Via Eurialo, 7c
00181 Roma RM, Italy

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16. Pizzeria a Taglio Angelo e Simonetta

Via Nomentana, 581, 00141 Roma RM, Italy

Angelo e Simonetta is located in a residential block in Monte Sacro a few miles northeast of the city center. Angelo Iezzi’s pizzeria, which was founded in the ’80s, was among the first to experiment with the high-hydration, long-fermented dough techniques that now define Rome’s premier slice shops. The pizza in teglia is medium-thick, with a light structure and fragrant aroma, the perfect base for toppings like monk’s beard and gorgonzola cream, or Norcia prosciutto and creamy buffalo mozzarella curds. The pizza is great, but much of the appeal is that Angelo e Simonetta really just feels like a neighborhood slice joint; it’s filled with workers at lunchtime, kids after school, and university students at all hours.

Via Nomentana, 581
00141 Roma RM, Italy

17. A Rota Pizzeria Romanesca

Via di Tor Pignattara, 190, 00177 Roma RM, Italy
From above, a white pizza with long strands of zucchini flower and anchovies.
Pizza with anchovies and zucchini flowers.
Andrea Di Lorenzo and Giulio Di Mauro

Restaurateur Marco Pucciotti and pizzaiolo Sami El Sabawy named their pizzeria for the Roman phrase “a rota,” meaning to consume something continuously. Diners take them up on it, again and again heading out to Tor Pignattara in eastern Rome for El Sabawy’s paper-thin pizza tonda. The pizzaiolo coaxes the low-hydration dough into a disk with a rolling pin, then cooks the pizza at a lower temperature for longer than usual, resulting in an incredibly crisp base for both classic and creative toppings. More inventive toppings change with the seasons, like April’s Sami Special: mozzarella, fennel gratin, Taggiasca olives, sundried tomato pesto, red onion gel, and fresh basil.

Via di Tor Pignattara, 190
00177 Roma RM, Italy

18. 180g Grammi Pizzeria Romana

Via Genazzano, 32, 00177 Roma RM, Italy
Part of a full pizza on a black background. The pizza is topped with chorizo, peppers, and sorrel.
Chorizo di polpo pizza.
Coffee and Lucas_my mediastudio

180g Pizzeria Romana’s relatively new location just off Via Prenestina uses — you guessed it — 180-gram dough balls for its thin, crisp Roman style pizza. The dough is stretched by hand and topped with familiar favorites like margherita and marinara, but many of the pizzas push into creative territory with texture, flavor, and temperature contrasts, as in the Emporio with berbere-scented grass pea puree, sauteed chicory, beet chutney, and marinated Jerusalem artichokes. Starters include folded pizza bianca filled with mortadella. The original location in Centocelle remains open for takeout and delivery only.

Via Genazzano, 32
00177 Roma RM, Italy

19. Pro Loco DOL

Via Domenico Panaroli, 35, 00172 Roma RM, Italy
A dining room with two tops set with tablecloths and settings for dinner. A large shelving unit in the back holds bottles of wine.
Inside Pro Loco DOL.
Pro Loco DOL

DOL, short for “di origine laziale,” celebrates the specialties from the region of Lazio (of which Rome is the capital). Proprietor Vincenzo Mancino has grown his locavore business from a single deli into several branches serving a full menu built completely from local ingredients. Over the past half dozen years, pizzaiolo Simone Salvatori has perfected the pizza at the Centocelle location, making the dough from organic flour and baking it in a pan in an electric oven. Toppings put products from Lazio on full display, including produce, cheeses, and cured meats.

Via Domenico Panaroli, 35
00172 Roma RM, Italy

20. Sforno

Via Statilio Ottato, 110/116, 00175 Roma RM, Italy

Sforno draws faithful crowds near the historic Cinecittà studios on Rome’s southeastern edge. Diverging from the thin-crust Roman style, the pizzeria makes a thick-rimmed, Naples-inspired pie, topped with classic and creative ingredients. The signature toppings include the Greenwich (stilton and port reduction) and cacio e pepe (black pepper and grated pecorino Romano). Fried starters like fiori di zucca (fried battered squash blossoms filled with mozzarella and anchovy) and assorted supplì (fried rice croquettes) are still among the best in the game.

Via Statilio Ottato, 110/116
00175 Roma RM, Italy

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