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A pastry shop with display case full of colorful treats. Behind the counter the wall is decorated with mirrors framing a classical female nude who holds various sweets.
Inside Stohrer.
Martin Bruno

The 14 Best Patisseries in Paris

From organic, gluten-free, sustainable choux and tartes, to the quintessential kouign-amann from a three-century-old shop, here’s where to eat pastries in Paris

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Inside Stohrer.
| Martin Bruno

In Paris, where corner mom-and-pop shops jockey for space with temples of haute-patisserie, pastry is part of everyday life. It isn’t uncommon to see lines of Parisians picking up fresh tartes for Sunday brunch with the family, or schoolchildren racing to their favorite bakery for a goûter (literally a “taste,” or petit snack). Across the city you’ll find a whole spectrum of intricately composed and elaborately decorated pastries that taste as special as they look: simple laminated viennoiserie like croissants and pain au chocolat, eclairs made with light choux dough, buttery sablés, and an ever-growing array of French and internationally inspired cakes, tartes, cookies, and brioches.

All of these wonderful pastries are sold at patisseries, shops dedicated specifically to sweet baked goods made with dough — as opposed to breads, which are sold at boulangeries. You shouldn’t count on picking up a great baguette along with your palmiers or vice versa, but some unconventional shops do excel at both bread and pastry.

The city is thick with pastry shops and competition is fierce. These 14 bakeries are among the greatest that Paris — and therefore the world — has to offer.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Des Gâteaux et du Pain

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89 Rue du Bac
75007 Paris, France

For those in the know, Claire Damon’s shops are an essential part of any pastry tour. Stop by her boulangerie-patisserie for the pomme tatin with maple syrup. And don’t miss her chausson aux pommes, the platonic ideal of breakfast pastries.

From above, pastry shells cut like leaves, bronzed by the oven, beside slices of apple.
Chausson aux pommes.
Philippe Vaures

2. Pierre Hermé

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72 rue Bonaparte, Paris
Île-de-France 75006, France
+33 1 43 54 47 77
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Long considered the guardian of modern pastry-making, Pierre Hermé needs little introduction. While everything on offer at his Paris boutiques is seductive, there are three key reasons to visit: the Ispahan croissant, composed of rose, raspberry, and lychee; the Infiniment Vanille shortbread tarte, featuring a combination of Mexican, Tahitian, and Madagascar vanillas; and the exquisite macarons, which come in eclectic flavors like smoked tea, saffron, iris, carrot, and violet.

Tan macarons arranged in a scene with full yuzu fruit including leaves.
Yuzu macarons.
Laurent Fau/Pierre Hermé Paris

3. Cédric Grolet Opéra

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35 Av. de l'Opéra
75002 Paris, France
01 83 95 21 02
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There are frequently lines outside the Cédric Grolet pastry shop near the Louvre, and not just because it’s in a touristy neighborhood. The sculpted fruits look like delicate miniatures of the originals, and their lovely flavors live up to that promise. The menu of breakfast items and viennoiserie are stunning complements: Think Paris-Brests, croissants, and pain au chocolat.

4. La Goutte d’Or Patisserie

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183 Rue Marcadet
75018 Paris, France
07 60 35 10 13
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On Rue Marcadet in the 18th Arrondissement, La Goutte d’Or Patisserie sells delicate patisserie, elegant tartes, and all manner of beautiful desserts for every occasion. The Paris-Brest is exquisite and the citron-yuzu tarte is the perfect balance of bracing and sweet. Take a jar of the house-made confiture (jam) to go.

A tarte with a base of packed crushed nuts, creamy center, and wobbly fruity jelly top.
Delicate pastries at La Goutte d’Or Patisserie.
Joann Pai/Eater

5. Gilles Marchal

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9 Rue Ravignan
75018 Paris, France
+33 1 85 34 73 30
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Gilles Marchal already made his mark on the pastry world as head chef at the Crillon, the Plaza Athénée, Le Bristol, and La Maison du Chocolat, but Parisians from all parts of town make the trek to the heart of Montmartre for his namesake patisserie. His madeleines are divine in flavors like lemon zest, grand cru dark chocolate, pine honey, and pistachio. Not surprisingly, his renditions of French classics like baba au rhum and tarte aux framboises are equally flawless.

Glossy raspberries piled high on a pastry base, with a small label reading Gilles Marchal stuck among the fruit.
Tarte aux framboises.
Gilles Marchal

6. Stohrer

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51 Rue Montorgueil
75002 Paris, France
01 42 33 38 20
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You haven’t lived until you’ve had a kouign-amann from Stohrer, a beautiful bakery in the Second where an array of savory quiches and salads sits across from a pastry case full of sweet delights. Caramelized to a deep amber, with a slight crunch, the kouign-amann is the epitome of pastry. They don’t always have them in stock, though, so defaulting to the choux pastry religieuse or a creamy eclair will still leave you satisfied.

From above, a cake topped with delicate pleats of cream.
Baba chantilly at Stohrer.
Géraldine Martens

7. Mamiche

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32 Rue du Château d'Eau
75010 Paris, France
01 42 08 42 02
Visit Website

Mamiche is among a string of new-school bakeries opening up in Paris that make the art of patisserie and viennoiserie more approachable. Opened by Cécile Khayat and Victoria Effantin, the shop offers a menu that’s more like an American bakery with French influence. (Or is it a French bakery with American influence?) Babkas sit next to eclairs, which cozy up beside beignets and palmiers. While Mamiche is technically a boulangerie, it’s one of the rare bakeries that does both ends of the French baked good spectrum well.

8. Bontemps

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57 rue de Bretagne, Paris
Île-de-France 75003, France
+33 1 42 74 10 68
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The nostalgic sablé, a classic shortbread, is elevated to new heights at this Marais shop. The old-fashioned theme extends to the charming interior, which is kitted out with antique display cases, light fixtures, and porcelain cake trays. The sablés come in two sizes. The large tartes arrive with fillings like pecan, lemon curd, gianduja, and candied chestnut and pear. Then there are the individual bite-sized cookies, sandwiched together with light ganache, perfect for nibbling on the go.

A box of sablés, topped with strawberries, chopped nuts, and plain creamy topping.
Small sablés.
Bontemps

9. Chocolaterie Jacques Genin

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133 Rue de Turenne
75003 Paris, France
+33 1 45 77 29 01
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Known for his soft caramels, otherworldly chocolates, and award-winning pastry, Jacques Genin is a classic triple threat. His boutique in the Marais showcases the full range of his talents. All the pastries — including mille-feuilles, tartes au citron, and Paris-Brest — are delicious.

Cases of chocolate in a modern space with exposed brick walls and blonde wood floors.
Inside Jacques Genin’s boutique.
Chocolaterie Jacques Genin

10. Boulangerie Utopie

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20 Rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud
75011 Paris, France
09 82 50 74 48
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Don’t be alarmed by the sheer volume of pastries, viennoiserie, and breads on offer at Boulangerie Utopie. Take your time to pick the treats that appeal to you most. Maybe it’s the tangy and sweet sourdough croissant, or the thyme and lemon cheesecake on a sablé base. Or maybe you’re more interested in the banana mille-feuille. You can’t go wrong no matter what you choose. Just remember to grab a loaf of bread for the road — it’s also very good, of course.

Rows of croissants on oven baking sheets.
Croissants at Boulangerie Utopie.
Boulangerie Utopie

11. Yann Couvreur Pâtisserie

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137 Avenue Parmentier
75010 Paris, France

Yann Couvreur is a household name in Paris these days, but his patisserie in the 11th is still worth its sugar. The excellent viennoiseries include croissants; roulés in flavors like pistachio, coconut, and rose praline; and buckwheat kouign-amann. The hautes-patisseries, meanwhile, include luscious lemon meringue tartes, rich chocolate eclairs, and a jaw-dropping seasonal St-Honoré.

A pastry with wavy sides topped with a large slab of yellow cream.
Kouign-amann.
Yann Couvreur Pâtisserie

12. Boulangerie Chambelland

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14 Rue Ternaux
75011 Paris, France
01 43 55 07 30
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Given gluten is such an essential part of Parisians’ day-to-day, it may seem impossible to run a gluten-free bakery in the city. But Boulangerie Chambelland is a local favorite. Their gluten-free breads, pastries, choux, tartes, and cakes are all exceptional counterparts to the gluten-filled pastries elsewhere. Even better: Chambelland is devoted to sustainability, and the bakers use all organic ingredients.

Two eclairs on a plate, topped with chocolate glaze, one split open to reveal a custardy interior.
Caramel eclair.
Curtis Bond

13. Boulangerie Bo

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85bis Rue de Charenton
75012 Paris, France
01 43 07 75 21
Visit Website

Patissier Olivier Haustraete spent two years working in Tokyo for Alain Ducasse. He builds on that experience at Boulangerie Bo, incorporating Japanese flavors — bean paste, yuzu, sansho pepper, roasted malt — into classic eclairs, tartes au citron, and mille-feuilles.

14. Tapisserie

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65 Rue de Charonne
75011 Paris, France
01 55 28 79 43
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Run by the same people behind everyone’s favorite Parisian restaurants — Septime and Clamato — Tapisserie in the 11th is worth the visit for the maple tart alone. (The same dessert appears on the menu at Clamato, but here you can give it full attention.) The substantial pate sucree base comes filled with a rich, smooth maple filling. If that doesn’t leave you full, the choux and viennoiserie are all just as delicious.

A tarte topped with rhubarb and jelly, on a wooden tabletop.
Fruit tarte at Tapisserie.
Joann Pai/Eater

1. Des Gâteaux et du Pain

89 Rue du Bac, 75007 Paris, France
From above, pastry shells cut like leaves, bronzed by the oven, beside slices of apple.
Chausson aux pommes.
Philippe Vaures

For those in the know, Claire Damon’s shops are an essential part of any pastry tour. Stop by her boulangerie-patisserie for the pomme tatin with maple syrup. And don’t miss her chausson aux pommes, the platonic ideal of breakfast pastries.

89 Rue du Bac
75007 Paris, France

2. Pierre Hermé

72 rue Bonaparte, Paris, Île-de-France 75006, France
Tan macarons arranged in a scene with full yuzu fruit including leaves.
Yuzu macarons.
Laurent Fau/Pierre Hermé Paris

Long considered the guardian of modern pastry-making, Pierre Hermé needs little introduction. While everything on offer at his Paris boutiques is seductive, there are three key reasons to visit: the Ispahan croissant, composed of rose, raspberry, and lychee; the Infiniment Vanille shortbread tarte, featuring a combination of Mexican, Tahitian, and Madagascar vanillas; and the exquisite macarons, which come in eclectic flavors like smoked tea, saffron, iris, carrot, and violet.

72 rue Bonaparte, Paris
Île-de-France 75006, France

3. Cédric Grolet Opéra

35 Av. de l'Opéra, 75002 Paris, France

There are frequently lines outside the Cédric Grolet pastry shop near the Louvre, and not just because it’s in a touristy neighborhood. The sculpted fruits look like delicate miniatures of the originals, and their lovely flavors live up to that promise. The menu of breakfast items and viennoiserie are stunning complements: Think Paris-Brests, croissants, and pain au chocolat.

35 Av. de l'Opéra
75002 Paris, France

4. La Goutte d’Or Patisserie

183 Rue Marcadet, 75018 Paris, France
A tarte with a base of packed crushed nuts, creamy center, and wobbly fruity jelly top.
Delicate pastries at La Goutte d’Or Patisserie.
Joann Pai/Eater

On Rue Marcadet in the 18th Arrondissement, La Goutte d’Or Patisserie sells delicate patisserie, elegant tartes, and all manner of beautiful desserts for every occasion. The Paris-Brest is exquisite and the citron-yuzu tarte is the perfect balance of bracing and sweet. Take a jar of the house-made confiture (jam) to go.

183 Rue Marcadet
75018 Paris, France

5. Gilles Marchal

9 Rue Ravignan, 75018 Paris, France
Glossy raspberries piled high on a pastry base, with a small label reading Gilles Marchal stuck among the fruit.
Tarte aux framboises.
Gilles Marchal

Gilles Marchal already made his mark on the pastry world as head chef at the Crillon, the Plaza Athénée, Le Bristol, and La Maison du Chocolat, but Parisians from all parts of town make the trek to the heart of Montmartre for his namesake patisserie. His madeleines are divine in flavors like lemon zest, grand cru dark chocolate, pine honey, and pistachio. Not surprisingly, his renditions of French classics like baba au rhum and tarte aux framboises are equally flawless.

9 Rue Ravignan
75018 Paris, France

6. Stohrer

51 Rue Montorgueil, 75002 Paris, France
From above, a cake topped with delicate pleats of cream.
Baba chantilly at Stohrer.
Géraldine Martens

You haven’t lived until you’ve had a kouign-amann from Stohrer, a beautiful bakery in the Second where an array of savory quiches and salads sits across from a pastry case full of sweet delights. Caramelized to a deep amber, with a slight crunch, the kouign-amann is the epitome of pastry. They don’t always have them in stock, though, so defaulting to the choux pastry religieuse or a creamy eclair will still leave you satisfied.

51 Rue Montorgueil
75002 Paris, France

7. Mamiche

32 Rue du Château d'Eau, 75010 Paris, France

Mamiche is among a string of new-school bakeries opening up in Paris that make the art of patisserie and viennoiserie more approachable. Opened by Cécile Khayat and Victoria Effantin, the shop offers a menu that’s more like an American bakery with French influence. (Or is it a French bakery with American influence?) Babkas sit next to eclairs, which cozy up beside beignets and palmiers. While Mamiche is technically a boulangerie, it’s one of the rare bakeries that does both ends of the French baked good spectrum well.

32 Rue du Château d'Eau
75010 Paris, France

8. Bontemps

57 rue de Bretagne, Paris, Île-de-France 75003, France
A box of sablés, topped with strawberries, chopped nuts, and plain creamy topping.
Small sablés.
Bontemps

The nostalgic sablé, a classic shortbread, is elevated to new heights at this Marais shop. The old-fashioned theme extends to the charming interior, which is kitted out with antique display cases, light fixtures, and porcelain cake trays. The sablés come in two sizes. The large tartes arrive with fillings like pecan, lemon curd, gianduja, and candied chestnut and pear. Then there are the individual bite-sized cookies, sandwiched together with light ganache, perfect for nibbling on the go.

57 rue de Bretagne, Paris
Île-de-France 75003, France

9. Chocolaterie Jacques Genin

133 Rue de Turenne, 75003 Paris, France
Cases of chocolate in a modern space with exposed brick walls and blonde wood floors.
Inside Jacques Genin’s boutique.
Chocolaterie Jacques Genin

Known for his soft caramels, otherworldly chocolates, and award-winning pastry, Jacques Genin is a classic triple threat. His boutique in the Marais showcases the full range of his talents. All the pastries — including mille-feuilles, tartes au citron, and Paris-Brest — are delicious.

133 Rue de Turenne
75003 Paris, France

10. Boulangerie Utopie

20 Rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud, 75011 Paris, France
Rows of croissants on oven baking sheets.
Croissants at Boulangerie Utopie.
Boulangerie Utopie

Don’t be alarmed by the sheer volume of pastries, viennoiserie, and breads on offer at Boulangerie Utopie. Take your time to pick the treats that appeal to you most. Maybe it’s the tangy and sweet sourdough croissant, or the thyme and lemon cheesecake on a sablé base. Or maybe you’re more interested in the banana mille-feuille. You can’t go wrong no matter what you choose. Just remember to grab a loaf of bread for the road — it’s also very good, of course.

20 Rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud
75011 Paris, France

11. Yann Couvreur Pâtisserie

137 Avenue Parmentier, 75010 Paris, France
A pastry with wavy sides topped with a large slab of yellow cream.
Kouign-amann.
Yann Couvreur Pâtisserie

Yann Couvreur is a household name in Paris these days, but his patisserie in the 11th is still worth its sugar. The excellent viennoiseries include croissants; roulés in flavors like pistachio, coconut, and rose praline; and buckwheat kouign-amann. The hautes-patisseries, meanwhile, include luscious lemon meringue tartes, rich chocolate eclairs, and a jaw-dropping seasonal St-Honoré.

137 Avenue Parmentier
75010 Paris, France

12. Boulangerie Chambelland

14 Rue Ternaux, 75011 Paris, France
Two eclairs on a plate, topped with chocolate glaze, one split open to reveal a custardy interior.
Caramel eclair.
Curtis Bond

Given gluten is such an essential part of Parisians’ day-to-day, it may seem impossible to run a gluten-free bakery in the city. But Boulangerie Chambelland is a local favorite. Their gluten-free breads, pastries, choux, tartes, and cakes are all exceptional counterparts to the gluten-filled pastries elsewhere. Even better: Chambelland is devoted to sustainability, and the bakers use all organic ingredients.

14 Rue Ternaux
75011 Paris, France

13. Boulangerie Bo

85bis Rue de Charenton, 75012 Paris, France

Patissier Olivier Haustraete spent two years working in Tokyo for Alain Ducasse. He builds on that experience at Boulangerie Bo, incorporating Japanese flavors — bean paste, yuzu, sansho pepper, roasted malt — into classic eclairs, tartes au citron, and mille-feuilles.

85bis Rue de Charenton
75012 Paris, France

14. Tapisserie

65 Rue de Charonne, 75011 Paris, France
A tarte topped with rhubarb and jelly, on a wooden tabletop.
Fruit tarte at Tapisserie.
Joann Pai/Eater

Run by the same people behind everyone’s favorite Parisian restaurants — Septime and Clamato — Tapisserie in the 11th is worth the visit for the maple tart alone. (The same dessert appears on the menu at Clamato, but here you can give it full attention.) The substantial pate sucree base comes filled with a rich, smooth maple filling. If that doesn’t leave you full, the choux and viennoiserie are all just as delicious.

65 Rue de Charonne
75011 Paris, France

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