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The 10 Hottest New Restaurants in Stockholm

Where to find everything from casual cafes to destination dinners

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Penny & Bill
| Official site

Today Eater returns to Stockholm, Sweden to focus on 10 newish restaurants that have been garnering some serious buzz. Once again food and wine writer Per Styregård has shared his picks for the hottest opening of the past 12 months.

It’s been a busy year for the city’s biggest names: Niklas Ekstedt now has a wine bar (Tyge & Sessil); Klas Lindberg finally has his own place (Portal); and fine-dining star Mathias Dahlgren focuses on vegetables at his latest venture (Rutabaga). Alums from top restaurants in the country like Fäviken and Frantzén are leading the pack, whether with on-trend cafes (Café Nizza) or pitch-perfect bars (Folii). There’s also a new destination for raw-bar fans (the Fishery), a small plates destination with a cheeky sense of humor (Punk Royale Café), and a charmer that has convinced dining obsessives to head outside the city limits (Skåpmat).

Looking for the essentials? Head to the 38. But for the newest and hottest (presented in geographical order), here now is the Eater Heatmap to Stockholm:

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Portal

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S:t Eriksplan 1, Stockholm
Stockholm 112 34, Sweden
+46 8 30 11 01
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Acclaimed chef Klas Lindberg opened his own venue, Portal, in the summer of 2016. Open all days of the week, with lunch Monday through Friday, Portal connects to a new trend on the Stockholm restaurant scene of availability and long opening hours. Lindberg's aim is to cook “uncomplicated food with distinct flavors from good produce.” Another ambition is to match each dish with bottles from the wine cellar selection of Totte Steneby, an award-winning sommelier.

2. Tyge & Sessil

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Brahegatan 4
114 37 Stockholm, Sweden
+46 8 519 422 77
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Chef Niklas Ekstedt has opened this new wine bar across the street from his Michelin-starred, wood-oven-driven namesake restaurant. On the premises, where logs for the oven were previously stored, Ekstedt’s head sommelier, Maximilian Mellfors, pours bespoke, primarily non-intervention wines and beers from around the world, accompanied by small dishes. Thankfully, due to the democratic no-reservations policy, anyone can score a table at this very busy spot close to Stureplan, Stockholm's longtime entertainment nucleus.

3. Penny & Bill

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Grev Turegatan 30, Stockholm
Stockholm 114 38, Sweden
+46 8 611 02 11
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Behind the bar at Penny & Bill, in the restored bank building from the ’70s, award-winning bartender Johan Evers is king. Together with the chefs, he creates ingenious “foodtails”: tailored combinations of cocktails and small plates. From the raw bar and grill comes fresh fish, seafood, and vegetables matched with a generous list of wines and brews.

4. Tegelbacken

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Tegelbacken 2
111 52 Stockholm, Sweden
+ 46 (0)8 25 16 55
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Celebrity chef Markus Aujalay recently took over what used to be the city’s oldest Japanese restaurant, Seikoen, and turned it into a colorful venue for cocktails and classic food. The kitchen recommends ordering three or four of the mid-sized dishes: beef tartare with oysters, halibut carpaccio, fried scallops with beurre noisette, tortellini with cep mushrooms, or fried duck breast with orange. On the sweet side, tuck into Pavlova with caramelized apples, chocolate mousse with salted caramel, or cloudberries with almond milk mousse. With gorgeous views of the government building, the parliament, and the royal castle, you can’t get any more central than this.

5. Rutabaga

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Södra Blasieholmshamnen 6, Stockholm
Stockholm 111 48, Sweden
+46 8 679 36 70
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Undisputed ruler of the Swedish fine-dining scene Mathias Dahlgren has thrown out not only the swanky Hollywood Regency interior from his double Michelin-starred Matsalen, but also the meat, fish, and much of the Nordic cooking traditions the original restaurant was known for. The meat-obsessed Stockholm restaurant crowd has been a bit skeptical of this act of innovation, but Rutabaga is a world-class, green, lacto-ovo-vegetarian kitchen that draws inspiration from the whole world.
Facebookcebook.com/RutabagaStockholm/

6. Punk Royale Café

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Folkungagatan 128, Stockholm
Stockholm 116 30, Sweden
+46 31 13 33 13
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Being one of the city’s most difficult restaurants to book, Punk Royale recently decided to add an adjacent cafe. Featuring its own kitchen, the cafe offers smaller “snacks,” as opposed to the restaurant’s long, multi-course tasting menu. In the characteristic tongue-in-cheek style of the owners, the snacks are named after increasing size and price: “craving,” “horny,” and “Ducasse.”

7. Café Nizza

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Åsögatan 171, Stockholm
Stockholm 116 32, Sweden
+46 8 640 99 50
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Former fine-dining restaurant managers Johan Agrell from Fäviken and Jon Lacotte from Frantzén teamed up with a group of other well-known restaurant pros to start this corner establishment. Seven days a week from noon to midnight, the place is packed with business-lunch eaters, foreign visitors, and regulars from the hipster-dense new restaurant and bar cluster at Södermalm. The three-course lunch and four-course dinner menus change daily, and feature high-quality produce prepared with inspiration from the Nordics and southern Europe. During summer, lean back in their spacy outdoor area and browse the well-stocked, huge wine cabinet.

8. Folii

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Erstagatan 21, Stockholm
Stockholm 116 36, Sweden
In February 2017, Jonas Sandberg, a former restaurant manager at Fäviken, and one of Sweden’s most celebrated sommeliers, Béatrice Becher, opened their dream bar. Wine is at the heart of the enterprise, while small dishes excel and a selection of cigars can be enjoyed in one of the chairs right outside, weather permitting. The wine list and menu change daily, and this is another walk-in-only spot.

A post shared by John Woxberg (@johnwoxberg) on

9. The Fishery

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Götgatan 132, Stockholm
Stockholm 118 62, Sweden
Chef Malin Söderström is the latest vendor to join the lineup at the Teatern food hall — and incidentally, she’s also the first first female chef to throw in with the likes of Magnus Nilsson (he’s selling hot dogs) and Adam Dahlberg and Albin Wessman (they’ve got a ramen stall). She offers a hearty fish stew based on blue mussel broth from the Swedish west coast, crayfish in sourdough bread, vendace roe with potatoes and smetana, and a choice of daily catches from the counter.

10. Skåpmat

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Turingevägen 9
153 36 Järna, Sweden
+46 70 561 20 55
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A 50-minute commuter train ride for a meal is quite far in a city like Stockholm, but this 25-seat, truly unpretentious restaurant in the small village of Järna most definitely makes it worthwhile. The short menu, which changes daily, features rod-caught fish acquired by one of the restaurateurs, vegetables and grains from talented biodynamic farmers in the area, and game from local hunters, all often served with some kind of sauce or condiment fermented in house. Local microbrews and a well-selected list of organic wines complete the picture.

#skåpmat ! Råraka med lökar, créme fraiche och krusbär @magdalenastenius

A post shared by dianapoppe (@dianapoppe) on

1. Portal

S:t Eriksplan 1, Stockholm, Stockholm 112 34, Sweden
Acclaimed chef Klas Lindberg opened his own venue, Portal, in the summer of 2016. Open all days of the week, with lunch Monday through Friday, Portal connects to a new trend on the Stockholm restaurant scene of availability and long opening hours. Lindberg's aim is to cook “uncomplicated food with distinct flavors from good produce.” Another ambition is to match each dish with bottles from the wine cellar selection of Totte Steneby, an award-winning sommelier.
S:t Eriksplan 1, Stockholm
Stockholm 112 34, Sweden

2. Tyge & Sessil

Brahegatan 4, 114 37 Stockholm, Sweden
Chef Niklas Ekstedt has opened this new wine bar across the street from his Michelin-starred, wood-oven-driven namesake restaurant. On the premises, where logs for the oven were previously stored, Ekstedt’s head sommelier, Maximilian Mellfors, pours bespoke, primarily non-intervention wines and beers from around the world, accompanied by small dishes. Thankfully, due to the democratic no-reservations policy, anyone can score a table at this very busy spot close to Stureplan, Stockholm's longtime entertainment nucleus.
Brahegatan 4
114 37 Stockholm, Sweden

3. Penny & Bill

Grev Turegatan 30, Stockholm, Stockholm 114 38, Sweden
Behind the bar at Penny & Bill, in the restored bank building from the ’70s, award-winning bartender Johan Evers is king. Together with the chefs, he creates ingenious “foodtails”: tailored combinations of cocktails and small plates. From the raw bar and grill comes fresh fish, seafood, and vegetables matched with a generous list of wines and brews.
Grev Turegatan 30, Stockholm
Stockholm 114 38, Sweden

4. Tegelbacken

Tegelbacken 2, 111 52 Stockholm, Sweden
Celebrity chef Markus Aujalay recently took over what used to be the city’s oldest Japanese restaurant, Seikoen, and turned it into a colorful venue for cocktails and classic food. The kitchen recommends ordering three or four of the mid-sized dishes: beef tartare with oysters, halibut carpaccio, fried scallops with beurre noisette, tortellini with cep mushrooms, or fried duck breast with orange. On the sweet side, tuck into Pavlova with caramelized apples, chocolate mousse with salted caramel, or cloudberries with almond milk mousse. With gorgeous views of the government building, the parliament, and the royal castle, you can’t get any more central than this.
Tegelbacken 2
111 52 Stockholm, Sweden

5. Rutabaga

Södra Blasieholmshamnen 6, Stockholm, Stockholm 111 48, Sweden
Facebookcebook.com/RutabagaStockholm/
Undisputed ruler of the Swedish fine-dining scene Mathias Dahlgren has thrown out not only the swanky Hollywood Regency interior from his double Michelin-starred Matsalen, but also the meat, fish, and much of the Nordic cooking traditions the original restaurant was known for. The meat-obsessed Stockholm restaurant crowd has been a bit skeptical of this act of innovation, but Rutabaga is a world-class, green, lacto-ovo-vegetarian kitchen that draws inspiration from the whole world.
Södra Blasieholmshamnen 6, Stockholm
Stockholm 111 48, Sweden

6. Punk Royale Café

Folkungagatan 128, Stockholm, Stockholm 116 30, Sweden
Being one of the city’s most difficult restaurants to book, Punk Royale recently decided to add an adjacent cafe. Featuring its own kitchen, the cafe offers smaller “snacks,” as opposed to the restaurant’s long, multi-course tasting menu. In the characteristic tongue-in-cheek style of the owners, the snacks are named after increasing size and price: “craving,” “horny,” and “Ducasse.”
Folkungagatan 128, Stockholm
Stockholm 116 30, Sweden

7. Café Nizza

Åsögatan 171, Stockholm, Stockholm 116 32, Sweden
Former fine-dining restaurant managers Johan Agrell from Fäviken and Jon Lacotte from Frantzén teamed up with a group of other well-known restaurant pros to start this corner establishment. Seven days a week from noon to midnight, the place is packed with business-lunch eaters, foreign visitors, and regulars from the hipster-dense new restaurant and bar cluster at Södermalm. The three-course lunch and four-course dinner menus change daily, and feature high-quality produce prepared with inspiration from the Nordics and southern Europe. During summer, lean back in their spacy outdoor area and browse the well-stocked, huge wine cabinet.
Åsögatan 171, Stockholm
Stockholm 116 32, Sweden

8. Folii

Erstagatan 21, Stockholm, Stockholm 116 36, Sweden
In February 2017, Jonas Sandberg, a former restaurant manager at Fäviken, and one of Sweden’s most celebrated sommeliers, Béatrice Becher, opened their dream bar. Wine is at the heart of the enterprise, while small dishes excel and a selection of cigars can be enjoyed in one of the chairs right outside, weather permitting. The wine list and menu change daily, and this is another walk-in-only spot.

A post shared by John Woxberg (@johnwoxberg) on

Erstagatan 21, Stockholm
Stockholm 116 36, Sweden

9. The Fishery

Götgatan 132, Stockholm, Stockholm 118 62, Sweden
Chef Malin Söderström is the latest vendor to join the lineup at the Teatern food hall — and incidentally, she’s also the first first female chef to throw in with the likes of Magnus Nilsson (he’s selling hot dogs) and Adam Dahlberg and Albin Wessman (they’ve got a ramen stall). She offers a hearty fish stew based on blue mussel broth from the Swedish west coast, crayfish in sourdough bread, vendace roe with potatoes and smetana, and a choice of daily catches from the counter.
Götgatan 132, Stockholm
Stockholm 118 62, Sweden

10. Skåpmat

Turingevägen 9, 153 36 Järna, Sweden
A 50-minute commuter train ride for a meal is quite far in a city like Stockholm, but this 25-seat, truly unpretentious restaurant in the small village of Järna most definitely makes it worthwhile. The short menu, which changes daily, features rod-caught fish acquired by one of the restaurateurs, vegetables and grains from talented biodynamic farmers in the area, and game from local hunters, all often served with some kind of sauce or condiment fermented in house. Local microbrews and a well-selected list of organic wines complete the picture.

#skåpmat ! Råraka med lökar, créme fraiche och krusbär @magdalenastenius

A post shared by dianapoppe (@dianapoppe) on

Turingevägen 9
153 36 Järna, Sweden

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