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The gilded dining room at Le Train Bleu
Restaurant Le Train Bleu Paris/Facebook

The 15 Hottest New Restaurants in Paris

From Niçoise seafood to perfect roast chicken to profiteroles sauced tableside, these are the buzziest bites in the City of Light

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The gilded dining room at Le Train Bleu
| Restaurant Le Train Bleu Paris/Facebook

Today, Eater returns to Paris to check in on the newest and buzziest dining destinations in France’s restaurant-rich capital. Once again, longtime resident and food writer Alexander Lobrano selects his picks for the unmissable openings of the past 12 months.

“This year’s most eagerly anticipated new restaurant in Paris hasn’t opened yet — Maison by Sota Atsumi, who won rave reviews for his exquisitely creative contemporary French cooking while chef at Clown Bar,” says Lobrano. “But the dining scene here is still sizzling.” He adds that Paris has never been more gastronomically cosmopolitan than it is right this minute, with menus spotlighting cuisines from around the world (Double Dragon, Ibrik Kitchen, Piero TT) like never before, while also placing renewed focus on the cooking of France’s own diverse regions, from Nice to Gascony and beyond (Baieta, Marsan).

For Paris’s essential stalwarts, head to the Paris 38, and for an even more comprehensive look at the City of Light, check out Eater’s Guide to Paris. But here now, the Eater Heatmap to Paris.

Eater’s bringing this map to life with a trip to Paris, brought to you by Black Tomato.See the full itinerary and book a food-filled trip now.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Substance

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18 Rue de Chaillot
75116 Paris, France
01 47 20 08 90
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After stints in the kitchens at Racines des Prés, Le Saint James, Le Meurice, and Lasserre, chef Matthias Marc, 25, has opened this chic restaurant with indigo walls and white marble tables in the silk-stocking 16th Arrondissement. There’s a a superb list of Champagnes, including the cuvee by winemaker Jacques Selosse from which it takes its name, and a daring modern bistro menu. Working in an open kitchen behind a counter of red Italian marble, Marc sends oysters poached in their own juices with horseradish cream and pickled beets; free-range Normandy chicken with celery root, roasted in a crust of salt, alongside scorched onions and peppery nasturtium leaves; and tart tatin made with cider and fermented apple juice. The restaurant’s immediate popularity proves that this sedate eastern Parisian neighborhood is getting a new gastronomic zeitgeist.

Pork loin with artichokes and seaweed at Substance
Restaurant Substance/Facebook

2. Rooster par Frédéric Duca

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137 Rue Cardinet
75017 Paris, France
01 45 79 91 48
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After several years in New York City, where he made Racines one of that city’s best French bistrots a vins, Marseilles-born chef Frederic Duca has returned to Paris and opened a stylish bistro. Duca, who admits he’s nostalgic for Brooklyn, where he lived for three years, also brought home some of what he describes as New York’s “freestyle approach to modern cooking, with chefs drawing inspiration from kitchens around the world.” This shows up on his Provence-meets-the-world menu, with dishes like veal and razor clam tartare garnished with smoked ricotta and bergamot, an open tart topped with red mullet on sauteed onions, and yellow pollack with pumpkin, macadamia, and spinach rissoles. The bay leaf-flavored panna cotta is the dessert not to miss.

3. Bouillon Chartier Montparnasse

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59 Boulevard du Montparnasse
75006 Paris, France
01 45 49 19 00
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One of the prettiest restaurants on the Left Bank has gone back to its roots as a bouillon, a uniquely Parisian type of restaurant serving an affordable menu to a crowd in a hurry. Formerly a brasserie known as Montparnasse 1900 — a reference to its gorgeous Art Nouveau decor — the space has a new name and a new menu that offers expediently served, value-priced dishes like oeuf mayo for 2 euros, céleri rémoulade for 2.70 euros, choucroute alsacienne for 10.80 euros, roast chicken for 9 euros, and profiteroles for 4.20 euros. It’s open daily, too.

Lobster a la Parisienne at Bouillon Chartier
Bouillon Chartier/Facebook

4. Piero TT

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44 Rue du Bac
75007 Paris, France
01 43 20 00 40
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Chef Pierre Gagnaire’s new Italian trattoria in the tres chic Rue du Bac has become an instant hit with local antique dealers, publishers, and boutique owners, among others. Gagnaire opened his first Italian spot in the ski resort of Courchevel, and then, knowing how mad Parisians are for this cuisine, he decided to open a second address in the capital in the space formerly occupied by his excellent seafood restaurant, Gaya, which has moved to the nearby rue Saint Simon. The menu debuts with classic antipasti like charcuterie and vitello tonnato, and then veers from tradition with dishes like raw cuttlefish with Barolo vinegar and crispy rice, fresh spaghetti with shellfish and truffles, gorgonzola and radicchio risotto, and veal cutlet Milanese with baby artichokes and watercress.

Pasta at Piero TT
Piere Gagnaire official

5. Marsane par Hélène Darroze

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4 Rue d'Assas
75006 Paris, France
01 42 22 00 11
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With restaurants in Paris and her post as head chef at the Connaught Hotel, Hélène Darroze is one of Europe’s most accomplished chefs. Now she’s reinvented  the Left Bank haute-cuisine restaurant where she first rose to fame with a new decor that banishes formality for intimacy. There’s an open kitchen on the first floor, anchored by a 1950s vintage wood-fired grill, while the second floor hosts 30 tables and 22-seat table d’hotes (like a set-menu chef’s table). The look of the duplex restaurant, designed by Patrice Gardera, is a very personal homage to Darroze’s origins in Marsan, the small southwestern French town where her family ran an esteemed eponymous restaurant for several generations. Darroze’s new menu also returns to her roots with a variety of dishes that reflect her love of southwestern French produce and traditional recipes, like escaoutoun, a polenta-like dish of cornmeal cooked in chicken bouillon and garnished with mascarpone, ewe’s milk cheese from the Basque Country, and mousseron mushrooms. There are also oysters in caviar gelee and wild salmon from the Ardour River, rolled in wood ashes and garnished with rhubarb. For something farther afield, try the dessert of Vietnamese chocolate with cumin and pickled lemons.

Pineapple, lemongrass, sarawak pepper, and coconut dessert at Marsane
Marsan par Hélène Darroze/Facebook

6. Bonne Aventure

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59 Rue des Rosiers
93400 Saint-Ouen, France
01 49 48 09 69
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At long last there’s a terrific place to have a meal before or after a visit to the famous Marché aux Puces, the flea market on the edge of Paris in Saint Ouen. Chef Alcidia Vulbeau, who formerly cooked at Frenchie, opened this bistrot a vins with white-washed walls, bare wood tables, and some appropriately retro bric-a-brac a couple of months ago. It’s been crowded ever since with antique mavens and local bobos who love its great list of organic, natural, and biodynamic wines and eclectic menu. During the week, it serves two good-value prix-fixe menus — two courses for 15 euros, three for 18 euros at lunch — and then goes a la carte for the same meal on the weekends. In the evening, there are cheese and charcuterie plates, along with a weekend-only tapas menu. The chalkboard specials change regularly, but expect dishes like grilled leeks with crushed hazelnuts in soy-cider vinaigrette, soba with duck breast and grilled shiitake mushrooms, and barley risotto with cockles and mussels.

Octopus with carrot at Bonne Aventure
Bonne Aventure/Facebook

7. La Poule au Pot

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9 Rue Vauvilliers
75001 Paris, France
01 42 36 32 96
Visit Website

When he took over this storied bistro in Les Halles, once the great central food market of Paris, chef Jean-François Piège wisely decided to leave the original 1950s atmosphere intact: mirror-tile covered pillars, floral wallpaper, tile floors, and a big antique radio on the copper bar where little brass plaques bear the names of famous patrons of yore, many of them French show-business people. Change, then, came in the form of an alluring new menu of cuisine bourgeoise classics, including dishes like oeufs mimosa (stuffed eggs topped with riced egg yolk, chives, and finely chopped crackling), galantine de canard (rolled duck stuffed with foie gras and ground duck), frog’s legs en persillade (garlic, parsley, butter), blanquette de veau (veal in a creamy sauce with baby vegetables), and turbot with hollandaise sauce. The great Gallic cooking and retro ambience have made this one of the chicest new bistros in Paris.

8. Ibrik Kitchen

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9 Rue de Mulhouse
75002 Paris, France
01 70 69 42 50
Visit Website

This new Romanian restaurant in the Sentier district — formerly Paris’s garment industry neighborhood and now one of its livelier and younger neighborhoods — looks a lot like an art gallery, with white-painted walls decorated with folk art, spotlights, and oak parquet. Working in an open kitchen, two award-winning young Romanian chefs are serving up what they describe as “neo-nostalgic” dishes, or riffs on traditional Romanian eats like pastramă, the roasted brined beef known as pastrami in most English speaking-countries, which comes to the table here covered with Transylvanian truffle shavings in a smoked-filled bell jar. There’s also sarmale, fermented cabbage rolls with meat-and-rice filling and a side of mămăligă cu smăntănă, a polenta-like cornmeal porridge with lashings of sour cream, and a rich nut-studded pistachio cake for dessert.

9. Billili

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136 Rue du Faubourg Poissonnière
75010 Paris, France
09 87 76 27 49
Visit Website

From the same team who opened the deservedly popular Les Arlots bistro next door, this new wine bar, not far from the Gare du Nord, also features the Gallic comfort food cooking of chef Thomas Brachet, as well as a broad selection of mostly natural and organic wines. The chalkboard menu changes regularly, but runs to dishes like braised octopus with Morteau sausage in Beaujolais sauce; blood pudding with potato puree; endive salad garnished with walnuts, radishes, potatoes, mushrooms, and hard-boiled eggs, topped with mayonnaise; and sandwiches, including one of roast pork with pickled carrots and cilantro pesto. No reservations, so get there early — this place is always packed.

10. Baieta

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5 Rue de Pontoise
75005 Paris, France
01 42 02 59 19
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In Nicoise dialect, “baieta” is the term for a little kiss. It’s also the name of young chef Julia Sedefdjian’s new restaurant in the Latin Quarter, and the word’s tender resonances come through in her very personal take on the cooking of Nice, her hometown, and Provence. One of the most rapidly rising chefs in Paris, Sedefdjian, 23, has been cooking since she was 17, and here she’s teamed up with two Martiniquais friends, Sébastien Jean-Joseph and Grégory Anelka, to create a place that’s hip — the black-and-white drawing on the wall is by their favorite tattoo artist — and relaxed, but impeccably professional in terms of both cuisine and service. Try Sedefdjian’s signature dishes: the jaune d’oeuf croustillante, a runny egg yolk inside of breadcrumb sphere, and the bouillabaieta, Sedefdjian’s delicate, deconstructed version of bouillabaisse. Or go for the caramelized pork belly with celery root puree, peanuts, and an herby green sauce; and the chef’s modern take on a classic cod with aioli and vegetables. Don’t miss the fennel shortbread with lemon cream, whipped mascarpone, lemon sorbet, and pastis for dessert, either.

Cod with shellfish at Baieta
Restaurant Baieta/Facebook

11. Le Saint Sébastien

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42 Rue Saint-Sébastien
75011 Paris, France
06 49 75 27 90
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Chef Rob Mendoza worked as sous chef at Willow’s Inn on Lummi Island near Seattle before moving to Paris and working at Verjus, one of the city’s best modern bistros. Now he’s opened his own place, with exposed stone walls and globe lamps, in the arrondissement that’s more of a nursery for emerging culinary talent than any other in the city: the 11th. The menu evolves regularly, but dishes like chicken wings with watercress, salsify in squid ink with egg yolk and chorizo, oyster mushrooms in mole sauce, and chocolate fondant with cardamom sauce reflect the chef’s international sensibility in the kitchen.

12. Le Train Bleu

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Place Louis-Armand
75012 Paris, France
01 43 43 09 06
Visit Website

At long last, one of the most beautiful restaurants in the world — whose sumptuous Belle Epoque dining rooms were unveiled in 1901 by French president Émile Loubet — once again has food that’s worthy of its palmy elegance. (Check out the wanderlust-inducing painting of the sunny southern destinations served by trains from the Gare de Lyon, the train station where the restaurant is located.) This is all thanks to the work of chef Michel Rostang and his daughters, who know run the place. Get here early before a trip or celebrate an arrival in Paris with dishes like a pate en croute of wild game and foie gras, quenelles de brochet (fluffy pike perch dumplings, a speciality of Lyon) in Newburg sauce, Sole Bonne Femme, and Poulet de Bresse — possibly the world’s best chicken — in a tarragon cream sauce with grilled Basmati rice. Profiteroles with vanilla ice cream and hot chocolate sauce are served from a tableside trolly, and note that the restaurant is open daily for lunch and dinner.

Le Train Bleu’s elaborate dining room
Restaurant Le Train Bleu Paris/Facebook

13. Double Dragon

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52 Rue Saint-Maur
75011 Paris, France
01 71 32 41 95

Franco-Filipino sisters Tatiana and Katia Levha are on a roll. After the success of their nearby bistro, Le Servan, they opened Double Dragon — an instantly popular new spot serving their take on comfort food from the Philippines, Hong Kong, and elsewhere in the East. Dishes include braised beef spring rolls with shiso leaves, chilled cucumber with lemongrass, crispy chicken on rice, tofu with X.O. sauce, and caramelized pork cheeks. No reservations, so be in line when the doors open, or come late. And if you’re heading for Marseilles anytime soon, the sisters are also signing the menu at the restaurant of the new hotel Les Bords de Mer in that city.

14. Le Chardenoux

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1 Rue Jules Vallès
75011 Paris, France
01 43 71 49 52
Visit Website

Chef-owner Cyril Lignac has given this historic bistro a new seafood menu and a visual makeover by London-based interior architect Martin Brudnizki. The new look includes plush ribbed red velvet banquettes, a harlequin floor, and a mural of trees that reaches to a ceiling framed by original Belle Epoque moldings. The young, style-conscious crowds seem to dig it, and tuck into dishes like prawns with chipotle mayonnaise, oysters with grilled sausages, salmon in Thai bouillon, langoustine ravioli, and scallops with Jerusalem artichokes and black truffles.

Roast chicken at Le Chardenoux
Le Chardenoux/Facebook

15. Cheval d’Or

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21 Rue de la Villette
75019 Paris, France

This is a dream team of two of the shrewdest restaurateurs in Paris: Chef Taku Sekine, who earned a big reputation at Dersou, and chef Florent Ciccoli of Jones and Café du Coin, who has repeatedly proven he knows exactly what stylish young Parisians want to eat. Together they’ve transformed a nondescript neighborhood Chinese restaurant with a bright-red façade in the ever-trendier 19th Arrondissement into one of the most hyped tables in Paris this year. The 30 spots in this small, canteen-style restaurant can only be booked via the restaurant’s website (there’s no phone), and they’ve been sold out ever since the doors opened. Fortunately, for those willing to endure a long wait, they also serve at a walk-ins-only counter with 16 stools. What’s set off the stampede is a menu of Asia meets Parisian bistronomie dishes, including sea snails in a bouillon made with shaoxing (Chinese rice wine), cinnamon, star anise, and brown sugar; piping hot bao buns filled with pork; steak tartare with tamarind sauce; chicken with watercress in a sauce of ginger, lemongrass, jasmine, white pepper, and spices; and addictive dessert bao filled with crème patissiere.

1. Substance

18 Rue de Chaillot, 75116 Paris, France
Pork loin with artichokes and seaweed at Substance
Restaurant Substance/Facebook

After stints in the kitchens at Racines des Prés, Le Saint James, Le Meurice, and Lasserre, chef Matthias Marc, 25, has opened this chic restaurant with indigo walls and white marble tables in the silk-stocking 16th Arrondissement. There’s a a superb list of Champagnes, including the cuvee by winemaker Jacques Selosse from which it takes its name, and a daring modern bistro menu. Working in an open kitchen behind a counter of red Italian marble, Marc sends oysters poached in their own juices with horseradish cream and pickled beets; free-range Normandy chicken with celery root, roasted in a crust of salt, alongside scorched onions and peppery nasturtium leaves; and tart tatin made with cider and fermented apple juice. The restaurant’s immediate popularity proves that this sedate eastern Parisian neighborhood is getting a new gastronomic zeitgeist.

18 Rue de Chaillot
75116 Paris, France

2. Rooster par Frédéric Duca

137 Rue Cardinet, 75017 Paris, France

After several years in New York City, where he made Racines one of that city’s best French bistrots a vins, Marseilles-born chef Frederic Duca has returned to Paris and opened a stylish bistro. Duca, who admits he’s nostalgic for Brooklyn, where he lived for three years, also brought home some of what he describes as New York’s “freestyle approach to modern cooking, with chefs drawing inspiration from kitchens around the world.” This shows up on his Provence-meets-the-world menu, with dishes like veal and razor clam tartare garnished with smoked ricotta and bergamot, an open tart topped with red mullet on sauteed onions, and yellow pollack with pumpkin, macadamia, and spinach rissoles. The bay leaf-flavored panna cotta is the dessert not to miss.

137 Rue Cardinet
75017 Paris, France

3. Bouillon Chartier Montparnasse

59 Boulevard du Montparnasse, 75006 Paris, France
Lobster a la Parisienne at Bouillon Chartier
Bouillon Chartier/Facebook

One of the prettiest restaurants on the Left Bank has gone back to its roots as a bouillon, a uniquely Parisian type of restaurant serving an affordable menu to a crowd in a hurry. Formerly a brasserie known as Montparnasse 1900 — a reference to its gorgeous Art Nouveau decor — the space has a new name and a new menu that offers expediently served, value-priced dishes like oeuf mayo for 2 euros, céleri rémoulade for 2.70 euros, choucroute alsacienne for 10.80 euros, roast chicken for 9 euros, and profiteroles for 4.20 euros. It’s open daily, too.

59 Boulevard du Montparnasse
75006 Paris, France

4. Piero TT

44 Rue du Bac, 75007 Paris, France
Pasta at Piero TT
Piere Gagnaire official

Chef Pierre Gagnaire’s new Italian trattoria in the tres chic Rue du Bac has become an instant hit with local antique dealers, publishers, and boutique owners, among others. Gagnaire opened his first Italian spot in the ski resort of Courchevel, and then, knowing how mad Parisians are for this cuisine, he decided to open a second address in the capital in the space formerly occupied by his excellent seafood restaurant, Gaya, which has moved to the nearby rue Saint Simon. The menu debuts with classic antipasti like charcuterie and vitello tonnato, and then veers from tradition with dishes like raw cuttlefish with Barolo vinegar and crispy rice, fresh spaghetti with shellfish and truffles, gorgonzola and radicchio risotto, and veal cutlet Milanese with baby artichokes and watercress.

44 Rue du Bac
75007 Paris, France

5. Marsane par Hélène Darroze

4 Rue d'Assas, 75006 Paris, France
Pineapple, lemongrass, sarawak pepper, and coconut dessert at Marsane
Marsan par Hélène Darroze/Facebook

With restaurants in Paris and her post as head chef at the Connaught Hotel, Hélène Darroze is one of Europe’s most accomplished chefs. Now she’s reinvented  the Left Bank haute-cuisine restaurant where she first rose to fame with a new decor that banishes formality for intimacy. There’s an open kitchen on the first floor, anchored by a 1950s vintage wood-fired grill, while the second floor hosts 30 tables and 22-seat table d’hotes (like a set-menu chef’s table). The look of the duplex restaurant, designed by Patrice Gardera, is a very personal homage to Darroze’s origins in Marsan, the small southwestern French town where her family ran an esteemed eponymous restaurant for several generations. Darroze’s new menu also returns to her roots with a variety of dishes that reflect her love of southwestern French produce and traditional recipes, like escaoutoun, a polenta-like dish of cornmeal cooked in chicken bouillon and garnished with mascarpone, ewe’s milk cheese from the Basque Country, and mousseron mushrooms. There are also oysters in caviar gelee and wild salmon from the Ardour River, rolled in wood ashes and garnished with rhubarb. For something farther afield, try the dessert of Vietnamese chocolate with cumin and pickled lemons.

4 Rue d'Assas
75006 Paris, France

6. Bonne Aventure

59 Rue des Rosiers, 93400 Saint-Ouen, France
Octopus with carrot at Bonne Aventure
Bonne Aventure/Facebook

At long last there’s a terrific place to have a meal before or after a visit to the famous Marché aux Puces, the flea market on the edge of Paris in Saint Ouen. Chef Alcidia Vulbeau, who formerly cooked at Frenchie, opened this bistrot a vins with white-washed walls, bare wood tables, and some appropriately retro bric-a-brac a couple of months ago. It’s been crowded ever since with antique mavens and local bobos who love its great list of organic, natural, and biodynamic wines and eclectic menu. During the week, it serves two good-value prix-fixe menus — two courses for 15 euros, three for 18 euros at lunch — and then goes a la carte for the same meal on the weekends. In the evening, there are cheese and charcuterie plates, along with a weekend-only tapas menu. The chalkboard specials change regularly, but expect dishes like grilled leeks with crushed hazelnuts in soy-cider vinaigrette, soba with duck breast and grilled shiitake mushrooms, and barley risotto with cockles and mussels.

59 Rue des Rosiers
93400 Saint-Ouen, France

7. La Poule au Pot

9 Rue Vauvilliers, 75001 Paris, France

When he took over this storied bistro in Les Halles, once the great central food market of Paris, chef Jean-François Piège wisely decided to leave the original 1950s atmosphere intact: mirror-tile covered pillars, floral wallpaper, tile floors, and a big antique radio on the copper bar where little brass plaques bear the names of famous patrons of yore, many of them French show-business people. Change, then, came in the form of an alluring new menu of cuisine bourgeoise classics, including dishes like oeufs mimosa (stuffed eggs topped with riced egg yolk, chives, and finely chopped crackling), galantine de canard (rolled duck stuffed with foie gras and ground duck), frog’s legs en persillade (garlic, parsley, butter), blanquette de veau (veal in a creamy sauce with baby vegetables), and turbot with hollandaise sauce. The great Gallic cooking and retro ambience have made this one of the chicest new bistros in Paris.

9 Rue Vauvilliers
75001 Paris, France

8. Ibrik Kitchen

9 Rue de Mulhouse, 75002 Paris, France

This new Romanian restaurant in the Sentier district — formerly Paris’s garment industry neighborhood and now one of its livelier and younger neighborhoods — looks a lot like an art gallery, with white-painted walls decorated with folk art, spotlights, and oak parquet. Working in an open kitchen, two award-winning young Romanian chefs are serving up what they describe as “neo-nostalgic” dishes, or riffs on traditional Romanian eats like pastramă, the roasted brined beef known as pastrami in most English speaking-countries, which comes to the table here covered with Transylvanian truffle shavings in a smoked-filled bell jar. There’s also sarmale, fermented cabbage rolls with meat-and-rice filling and a side of mămăligă cu smăntănă, a polenta-like cornmeal porridge with lashings of sour cream, and a rich nut-studded pistachio cake for dessert.

9 Rue de Mulhouse
75002 Paris, France

9. Billili

136 Rue du Faubourg Poissonnière, 75010 Paris, France

From the same team who opened the deservedly popular Les Arlots bistro next door, this new wine bar, not far from the Gare du Nord, also features the Gallic comfort food cooking of chef Thomas Brachet, as well as a broad selection of mostly natural and organic wines. The chalkboard menu changes regularly, but runs to dishes like braised octopus with Morteau sausage in Beaujolais sauce; blood pudding with potato puree; endive salad garnished with walnuts, radishes, potatoes, mushrooms, and hard-boiled eggs, topped with mayonnaise; and sandwiches, including one of roast pork with pickled carrots and cilantro pesto. No reservations, so get there early — this place is always packed.

136 Rue du Faubourg Poissonnière
75010 Paris, France

10. Baieta

5 Rue de Pontoise, 75005 Paris, France
Cod with shellfish at Baieta
Restaurant Baieta/Facebook

In Nicoise dialect, “baieta” is the term for a little kiss. It’s also the name of young chef Julia Sedefdjian’s new restaurant in the Latin Quarter, and the word’s tender resonances come through in her very personal take on the cooking of Nice, her hometown, and Provence. One of the most rapidly rising chefs in Paris, Sedefdjian, 23, has been cooking since she was 17, and here she’s teamed up with two Martiniquais friends, Sébastien Jean-Joseph and Grégory Anelka, to create a place that’s hip — the black-and-white drawing on the wall is by their favorite tattoo artist — and relaxed, but impeccably professional in terms of both cuisine and service. Try Sedefdjian’s signature dishes: the jaune d’oeuf croustillante, a runny egg yolk inside of breadcrumb sphere, and the bouillabaieta, Sedefdjian’s delicate, deconstructed version of bouillabaisse. Or go for the caramelized pork belly with celery root puree, peanuts, and an herby green sauce; and the chef’s modern take on a classic cod with aioli and vegetables. Don’t miss the fennel shortbread with lemon cream, whipped mascarpone, lemon sorbet, and pastis for dessert, either.

5 Rue de Pontoise
75005 Paris, France

11. Le Saint Sébastien

42 Rue Saint-Sébastien, 75011 Paris, France

Chef Rob Mendoza worked as sous chef at Willow’s Inn on Lummi Island near Seattle before moving to Paris and working at Verjus, one of the city’s best modern bistros. Now he’s opened his own place, with exposed stone walls and globe lamps, in the arrondissement that’s more of a nursery for emerging culinary talent than any other in the city: the 11th. The menu evolves regularly, but dishes like chicken wings with watercress, salsify in squid ink with egg yolk and chorizo, oyster mushrooms in mole sauce, and chocolate fondant with cardamom sauce reflect the chef’s international sensibility in the kitchen.

42 Rue Saint-Sébastien
75011 Paris, France

12. Le Train Bleu

Place Louis-Armand, 75012 Paris, France
Le Train Bleu’s elaborate dining room
Restaurant Le Train Bleu Paris/Facebook

At long last, one of the most beautiful restaurants in the world — whose sumptuous Belle Epoque dining rooms were unveiled in 1901 by French president Émile Loubet — once again has food that’s worthy of its palmy elegance. (Check out the wanderlust-inducing painting of the sunny southern destinations served by trains from the Gare de Lyon, the train station where the restaurant is located.) This is all thanks to the work of chef Michel Rostang and his daughters, who know run the place. Get here early before a trip or celebrate an arrival in Paris with dishes like a pate en croute of wild game and foie gras, quenelles de brochet (fluffy pike perch dumplings, a speciality of Lyon) in Newburg sauce, Sole Bonne Femme, and Poulet de Bresse — possibly the world’s best chicken — in a tarragon cream sauce with grilled Basmati rice. Profiteroles with vanilla ice cream and hot chocolate sauce are served from a tableside trolly, and note that the restaurant is open daily for lunch and dinner.

Place Louis-Armand
75012 Paris, France

13. Double Dragon

52 Rue Saint-Maur, 75011 Paris, France

Franco-Filipino sisters Tatiana and Katia Levha are on a roll. After the success of their nearby bistro, Le Servan, they opened Double Dragon — an instantly popular new spot serving their take on comfort food from the Philippines, Hong Kong, and elsewhere in the East. Dishes include braised beef spring rolls with shiso leaves, chilled cucumber with lemongrass, crispy chicken on rice, tofu with X.O. sauce, and caramelized pork cheeks. No reservations, so be in line when the doors open, or come late. And if you’re heading for Marseilles anytime soon, the sisters are also signing the menu at the restaurant of the new hotel Les Bords de Mer in that city.

52 Rue Saint-Maur
75011 Paris, France

14. Le Chardenoux

1 Rue Jules Vallès, 75011 Paris, France
Roast chicken at Le Chardenoux
Le Chardenoux/Facebook

Chef-owner Cyril Lignac has given this historic bistro a new seafood menu and a visual makeover by London-based interior architect Martin Brudnizki. The new look includes plush ribbed red velvet banquettes, a harlequin floor, and a mural of trees that reaches to a ceiling framed by original Belle Epoque moldings. The young, style-conscious crowds seem to dig it, and tuck into dishes like prawns with chipotle mayonnaise, oysters with grilled sausages, salmon in Thai bouillon, langoustine ravioli, and scallops with Jerusalem artichokes and black truffles.

1 Rue Jules Vallès
75011 Paris, France

15. Cheval d’Or

21 Rue de la Villette, 75019 Paris, France

This is a dream team of two of the shrewdest restaurateurs in Paris: Chef Taku Sekine, who earned a big reputation at Dersou, and chef Florent Ciccoli of Jones and Café du Coin, who has repeatedly proven he knows exactly what stylish young Parisians want to eat. Together they’ve transformed a nondescript neighborhood Chinese restaurant with a bright-red façade in the ever-trendier 19th Arrondissement into one of the most hyped tables in Paris this year. The 30 spots in this small, canteen-style restaurant can only be booked via the restaurant’s website (there’s no phone), and they’ve been sold out ever since the doors opened. Fortunately, for those willing to endure a long wait, they also serve at a walk-ins-only counter with 16 stools. What’s set off the stampede is a menu of Asia meets Parisian bistronomie dishes, including sea snails in a bouillon made with shaoxing (Chinese rice wine), cinnamon, star anise, and brown sugar; piping hot bao buns filled with pork; steak tartare with tamarind sauce; chicken with watercress in a sauce of ginger, lemongrass, jasmine, white pepper, and spices; and addictive dessert bao filled with crème patissiere.

21 Rue de la Villette
75019 Paris, France

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