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The 12 Hottest New Restaurants in Mexico City

Where to find soft shell crab tostadas, whole suckling pig, and every kind of taco imaginable

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Today, Eater returns to Mexico City to take a look at 12 buzzy spots from the past year. For this installment, food and travel writer Natalia de la Rosa offers her picks for the hottest drinking and dining her city has to offer.

“Chefs from all over — either Mexican expats working in kitchens abroad or up and coming chefs from the U.S. and Europe — are finding their way to Mexico City,” says de la Rosa.

Among her picks, a Sinaloan seafood stall at the San Juan Market, a midcentury-inspired cocktail bar, and a lunchtime bistro with epic views.

Looking for an even more comprehensive take on Mexico City, from essential dishes to must-visit bakeries? Consult the Eater Guide to Mexico City. But for the freshest takes, here is the Eater Heatmap to Mexico City.

Eater’s bringing this map to life with a trip to Mexico City, brought to you by Black Tomato. See the full itinerary and book a food-filled trip now.


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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Carmela y Sal Restaurante

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Lomas - Virreyes, Molino del Rey, 11040 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico
01 55 7600 1280
Visit Website

With Carmela y Sal, Gabriela Ruiz — whose first restaurant, Gourmet MX, is located in the southern state of Tabasco — brings her culinary vision to the city’s corporate district of Palmas. Cacao, banana leaves, plantains, coconuts, and other tropical ingredients from her home state come together harmoniously in dishes like the “Christmas” suckling pig and the orange peel-fed lamb confit. Ruiz’s cocktails — which feature spices, flowers, and fruit — are a delightful surprise.

Octopus Tiradito at Carmela y Sal Restaurante
Photo: Carmela y Sal/Facebook

2. Nom Polanco

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Alejandro Dumas 125, Polanco, Polanco IV Secc, 11550 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico

Hidden away down a small alley in Polanco, Nom is an intimate speakeasy-style bar and restaurant that fits 16 people per sitting. The omakase menu changes daily according to ingredient availability, and features dishes like hamachi and clam with yuzu vinaigrette and wagyu short-rib dim sum. Reservations are a must, and you can choose between a five-course menu at lunch or the longer nine-course dinner version with optional wine pairings.

Steal at NOM placano
Photo: NOM placano/Facebook

3. Noso Restaurante

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Eugenio Sue 94, Polanco, Polanco IV Secc, 11550 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico
01 55 5801 0338
Visit Website

Spanish-style haute cuisine has a new haven in Mexico City: Nosso. An elegant dining room and well-curated wine cellar are built around a small but outstanding menu, where the amuse-bouche (an Ell Bulli-style spherified olive) pays tribute to the molecular trend of the early 2000s. Still, most of Nosso’s tasting menu dishes and a la carte options feel current, including a perfect lobster, Spanish-style rice, and an oxtail stew to come back for.

Bull tail at Noso Restaurante
Photo: NOSO/Facebook

4. Restaurante Lur

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Av. Pdte. Masaryk 86, Polanco, Polanco V Secc, 11560 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico
01 55 5545 6802
Visit Website

This is the most recent opening from chefs Mikel Alonso and Gerard Bellver of the temporarily closed Biko. Like its older sibling, Lur features an elegant crossover between the Mexican and Basque food traditions, but here, the feel is less fussy — homey, even. Roast beef tostadas or grilled pork chops are go-tos, delivered with a refined level of service.

Potato Gnocchi at RESTAURANTE LUR
Photo: RESTAURANTE LUR/Facebook

5. Molino El Pujol

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Gral. Benjamín Hill 146, Hipódromo Condesa, 06100 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico
01 55 5271 3515
Visit Website

If you dropped the ball on making those Pujol reservations, go to Condesa to get a glimpse of Enrique Olvera’s magic. This is strictly a tortilleria, but you can still try small bites like a blue corn avocado taco, corn water, bean stew, and the best corn on the cob you’ll ever have — the chicatana (flying ant) mayonnaise is the same version featured on Pujol’s tasting menu.

Tortillas at Molino El Pujol
Photo: MolinoPujol/Facebook

6. Café Milou

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Av. Veracruz 38, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico
01 55 7098 1422
Visit Website

Café Milou is a petite brasserie located on a quiet Condesa street. The classic French menu is simple, but all dishes star local ingredients, from the pork rillettes, terrines, and trout confit to heartier options like roasted chicken or bone marrow with capers. The charcuterie and cheese selection are musts, best enjoyed with a glass from the mostly French wine list.

A post shared by Café Milou (@cafe_milou) on

7. La Guerrerense

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Avenida Nuevo León 107, Hipódromo, 06100 Cuauhtemoc
CDMX, Mexico
01 55 8434 0407
Visit Website

This was one of Anthony Bourdain’s favorite seafood stops in Ensenada and, as of last year, you can find its mind-blowing tostadas in Mexico City too. Sabina Bandera, the mastermind behind Baja’s most acclaimed seafood cart, prepares her marvels with some of the city’s freshest seafood — the fishermen come to her before everybody else in town. The most popular tostada combinations are sea urchin ceviche topped with clam, fish pate with scallops, and sea snail ceviche, but feel free to explore the menu — it’s all good. Note: La Guerrerense is open for lunch only.

Clams at La Guerrerense
Photo: La Guerrerense/Facebook

8. Cercano Comedor

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Av México 157, Hipódromo, 06100 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico
01 55 5564 6810

This small Condesa restaurant has become a favorite lunch destination among locals, who come for its peerless view of Parque Mexico and informal bistro-style menu with wine pairings. Take in the vistas over octopus and clam stew or the creamy rice with wild mushrooms.

Cercano Comedor
Photo: Cercano Comedor/Facebook

9. Taqueria Orinoco

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Insurgentes Sur 253, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico
01 55 5514 6917
Visit Website

For a late-night taco binge, go to Taquería Orinoco, which specializes in northern-style tacos characterized by quality beef and huge flour tortillas. Skip the al pastor taco and go straight to the steak with cheese and the chicharron (pork skin) tacos, or, even better, the pirata: a big flour tortilla taco with melted cheese and rib eye. The terrific tacos pair well with Orinoco’s five house-made salsas and the smashed fried potatoes.

10. Sartoria

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Orizaba 42, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico
01 55 7265 3616
Visit Website

Nested just a few steps away from one of the most beautiful plazas in the Roma neighborhood, Sartoria is currently the Italian restaurant for Mexico City. Chef Marco Carboni — an alum at Massimo Bottura’s Francescana — has created a vibrant and contemporary trattoria executing classic Italian dishes with top ingredients from Mexican producers. The menu’s essentials include octopus carpaccio, seafood risotto, and handmade gnocchi paired with a wine list featuring remarkable Italian wines at fairly good prices.

Tortelli at Sartoria
Photo: Sartoria Official Website

11. Meroma

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Colima 150, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico
01 55 5920 2654

Downstairs, a midcentury-inspired cocktail bar features craft cocktails and nibbles like soft-shell crab tostadas or beef tartare. Upstairs, the dining room and terrace create a lovely frame for dishes that feature seasonal ingredients from towns like Texcoco and Puebla. Meroma’s deftly prepared duck breast with roasted carrots is a highlight, along with the deliciously simple heirloom tomato salad.

A dish at Meroma
Meroma
Photo: Meroma Official Website

12. Mariscos Don Vergas

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2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000 México
CDMX, Mexico

Located inside downtown’s iconic San Juan Market, Mariscos Don Vergas puts a spotlight on Sinaloa-style seafood. The owner hails from that northern coastal state and brings all of the produce as well as seafood, like clams, shrimp, snails, crab, oysters, and more, from Sinaloa each week. The resulting menu is not a set list of dishes, but rather the catch of the day prepared as a series of ceviches, aguachiles, stews, and tacos. Don Vergas is only open on weekends and holidays. Follow it on Instagram to see the current calendar.

A post shared by Don Vergas (@donvergasmariscos) on

1. Carmela y Sal Restaurante

Lomas - Virreyes, Molino del Rey, 11040 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
Octopus Tiradito at Carmela y Sal Restaurante
Photo: Carmela y Sal/Facebook

With Carmela y Sal, Gabriela Ruiz — whose first restaurant, Gourmet MX, is located in the southern state of Tabasco — brings her culinary vision to the city’s corporate district of Palmas. Cacao, banana leaves, plantains, coconuts, and other tropical ingredients from her home state come together harmoniously in dishes like the “Christmas” suckling pig and the orange peel-fed lamb confit. Ruiz’s cocktails — which feature spices, flowers, and fruit — are a delightful surprise.

Lomas - Virreyes, Molino del Rey, 11040 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico

2. Nom Polanco

Alejandro Dumas 125, Polanco, Polanco IV Secc, 11550 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
Steal at NOM placano
Photo: NOM placano/Facebook

Hidden away down a small alley in Polanco, Nom is an intimate speakeasy-style bar and restaurant that fits 16 people per sitting. The omakase menu changes daily according to ingredient availability, and features dishes like hamachi and clam with yuzu vinaigrette and wagyu short-rib dim sum. Reservations are a must, and you can choose between a five-course menu at lunch or the longer nine-course dinner version with optional wine pairings.

Alejandro Dumas 125, Polanco, Polanco IV Secc, 11550 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico

3. Noso Restaurante

Eugenio Sue 94, Polanco, Polanco IV Secc, 11550 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
Bull tail at Noso Restaurante
Photo: NOSO/Facebook

Spanish-style haute cuisine has a new haven in Mexico City: Nosso. An elegant dining room and well-curated wine cellar are built around a small but outstanding menu, where the amuse-bouche (an Ell Bulli-style spherified olive) pays tribute to the molecular trend of the early 2000s. Still, most of Nosso’s tasting menu dishes and a la carte options feel current, including a perfect lobster, Spanish-style rice, and an oxtail stew to come back for.

Eugenio Sue 94, Polanco, Polanco IV Secc, 11550 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico

4. Restaurante Lur

Av. Pdte. Masaryk 86, Polanco, Polanco V Secc, 11560 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
Potato Gnocchi at RESTAURANTE LUR
Photo: RESTAURANTE LUR/Facebook

This is the most recent opening from chefs Mikel Alonso and Gerard Bellver of the temporarily closed Biko. Like its older sibling, Lur features an elegant crossover between the Mexican and Basque food traditions, but here, the feel is less fussy — homey, even. Roast beef tostadas or grilled pork chops are go-tos, delivered with a refined level of service.

Av. Pdte. Masaryk 86, Polanco, Polanco V Secc, 11560 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico

5. Molino El Pujol

Gral. Benjamín Hill 146, Hipódromo Condesa, 06100 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
Tortillas at Molino El Pujol
Photo: MolinoPujol/Facebook

If you dropped the ball on making those Pujol reservations, go to Condesa to get a glimpse of Enrique Olvera’s magic. This is strictly a tortilleria, but you can still try small bites like a blue corn avocado taco, corn water, bean stew, and the best corn on the cob you’ll ever have — the chicatana (flying ant) mayonnaise is the same version featured on Pujol’s tasting menu.

Gral. Benjamín Hill 146, Hipódromo Condesa, 06100 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico

6. Café Milou

Av. Veracruz 38, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

Café Milou is a petite brasserie located on a quiet Condesa street. The classic French menu is simple, but all dishes star local ingredients, from the pork rillettes, terrines, and trout confit to heartier options like roasted chicken or bone marrow with capers. The charcuterie and cheese selection are musts, best enjoyed with a glass from the mostly French wine list.

Av. Veracruz 38, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico

7. La Guerrerense

Avenida Nuevo León 107, Hipódromo, 06100 Cuauhtemoc, CDMX, Mexico
Clams at La Guerrerense
Photo: La Guerrerense/Facebook

This was one of Anthony Bourdain’s favorite seafood stops in Ensenada and, as of last year, you can find its mind-blowing tostadas in Mexico City too. Sabina Bandera, the mastermind behind Baja’s most acclaimed seafood cart, prepares her marvels with some of the city’s freshest seafood — the fishermen come to her before everybody else in town. The most popular tostada combinations are sea urchin ceviche topped with clam, fish pate with scallops, and sea snail ceviche, but feel free to explore the menu — it’s all good. Note: La Guerrerense is open for lunch only.

Avenida Nuevo León 107, Hipódromo, 06100 Cuauhtemoc
CDMX, Mexico

8. Cercano Comedor

Av México 157, Hipódromo, 06100 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
Cercano Comedor
Photo: Cercano Comedor/Facebook

This small Condesa restaurant has become a favorite lunch destination among locals, who come for its peerless view of Parque Mexico and informal bistro-style menu with wine pairings. Take in the vistas over octopus and clam stew or the creamy rice with wild mushrooms.

Av México 157, Hipódromo, 06100 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico

9. Taqueria Orinoco

Insurgentes Sur 253, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico

For a late-night taco binge, go to Taquería Orinoco, which specializes in northern-style tacos characterized by quality beef and huge flour tortillas. Skip the al pastor taco and go straight to the steak with cheese and the chicharron (pork skin) tacos, or, even better, the pirata: a big flour tortilla taco with melted cheese and rib eye. The terrific tacos pair well with Orinoco’s five house-made salsas and the smashed fried potatoes.

Insurgentes Sur 253, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico

10. Sartoria

Orizaba 42, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
Tortelli at Sartoria
Photo: Sartoria Official Website

Nested just a few steps away from one of the most beautiful plazas in the Roma neighborhood, Sartoria is currently the Italian restaurant for Mexico City. Chef Marco Carboni — an alum at Massimo Bottura’s Francescana — has created a vibrant and contemporary trattoria executing classic Italian dishes with top ingredients from Mexican producers. The menu’s essentials include octopus carpaccio, seafood risotto, and handmade gnocchi paired with a wine list featuring remarkable Italian wines at fairly good prices.

Orizaba 42, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico

11. Meroma

Colima 150, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
A dish at Meroma
Meroma
Photo: Meroma Official Website

Downstairs, a midcentury-inspired cocktail bar features craft cocktails and nibbles like soft-shell crab tostadas or beef tartare. Upstairs, the dining room and terrace create a lovely frame for dishes that feature seasonal ingredients from towns like Texcoco and Puebla. Meroma’s deftly prepared duck breast with roasted carrots is a highlight, along with the deliciously simple heirloom tomato salad.

Colima 150, Roma Nte., 06700 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico

12. Mariscos Don Vergas

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000 México, CDMX, Mexico

Located inside downtown’s iconic San Juan Market, Mariscos Don Vergas puts a spotlight on Sinaloa-style seafood. The owner hails from that northern coastal state and brings all of the produce as well as seafood, like clams, shrimp, snails, crab, oysters, and more, from Sinaloa each week. The resulting menu is not a set list of dishes, but rather the catch of the day prepared as a series of ceviches, aguachiles, stews, and tacos. Don Vergas is only open on weekends and holidays. Follow it on Instagram to see the current calendar.

2ᵃ Calle de Ernesto Pugibet 21, Colonia Centro, Centro, 06000 México
CDMX, Mexico

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