clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile

The 13 Hottest Restaurants in Buenos Aires Right Now

Classic and international trends are buzzing in Argentina

View as Map

Here now, for the first time ever, Eater heads to Buenos Aires, Argentina, to discover the buzziest spots for eating and drinking. Guiding us on our journey is writer and Pick Up the Fork founder Allie Lazar, who takes it away below:

Beef will never go out of style in Buenos Aires. Parrillas (steakhouses) and old-school bodegones (casual neighborhood cantinas) continue to dominate the meat-centric restaurant scene with time-honored renditions of barbecued meats and comfort foods. While most palates still gravitate toward conservative Spanish and Italian traditions, many porteños (people of Buenos Aires) are expanding their horizons by opening their minds and stomachs.

During the past 12 months, many of the city's gastro-elites have looked into Argentina's past and abroad for culinary inspiration. New restaurants are both reinventing classics and imitating international food trends (with a slight four-year delay). The city's top street food sandwich, customarily eaten off of grill carts, has now turned into a trendy brick-and-mortar; burger bars are and springing up with furor; the craft beer craze has opened the eyes of many to a new world of drinking; and Asian-fusion restaurants go beyond the customary cream cheese and passionfruit sushi rolls to introduce intrepid eaters to novelties like ramen, pork buns, and kimchi. Here now, and in geographic order, is the Eater Heatmap to Buenos Aires:

Since first-time visitors might not feel an inkling for a burger or Asian food while in Buenos Aires, make sure to memorize Eater's 38 Essential Restaurants, which will lead you towards the city's indispensable spots.

Read More
Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

Pulpería Quilapán

Copy Link

It took Pulpería Quilapán over four years to open to the public, but now, its charming 19th-century mansion (in one of BA’s oldest neighborhoods) triples as a restaurant, general store, and social club. The space first had to be gutted and totally refurbished before its French owners could begin decorating with one-of-a-kind antiques and historical memorabilia. The two patios are prime for warm-weather drinking and an impromptu foosball game. The actual food can be hit or miss (ask for the daily special promos) and servers can have a bit of a ‘tude, but the oasis remains an absolute treasure chest to soak in the cultural history of Buenos Aires. Plus, its social calendar is filled with fun activities.

Los Galgos

Copy Link

Many new coffee shops feel more like Brooklyn than Buenos Aires, but Los Galgos revives the city’s nostalgic café culture for the modern age. This historic corner café and bar in Tribunales, which dates back to the 1930s, suddenly closed last year after changes in management. But it was quickly brought back to life, remodeled, and renovated to appeal to multiple generations. A properly made cortado and warm medialunas attract courthouse workers; a rowdy lunch crowd piles in and fuels up on hearty fried milanesa sandwiches; and cocktail aficionados commute from afar for pre-dinner aperitivos and charcuterie picada platters. It doesn’t get much more “Buenos Aires in the year 2016” than this.

Nueva Casa Japonesa

Copy Link

A few years ago, many would have scoffed at the idea of eating soup as a main meal. But flash-forward in time and the ramen craze has caught BA by slurping storm. On the bottom floor of Nueva Casa Japonesa, you’ll find one of the only meccas in the city with imported Japanese products. Then, walk upstairs and enter a haven for the Japanese community, who are face-deep in comforting bowls of udon and ramen soups.

Allie Lazar

Proper Restaurant

Copy Link

Proper became an instant hit the day it opened. A crew of young seasoned cooks flip familiar Argentine ingredients on their head to create a cohesive line-up of small plates that change daily. The industrial vibe of the former mechanic garage is warmed by the heart of the project, an impressive custom-built wood-fired oven that incubates dishes like pork flank with red bean ketchup, smoked sweet potato with blue cheese, and halloumi provoleta dressed in a date vinaigrette. Go with a group, take over the long communal table, and order everything — making sure to save room for dessert, banana split pie and flan with dulce de leche.

Cosi Mi Piace

Copy Link

Even though more than half of all Argentines are of Italian descent, Buenos Aires-style pizza shows little resemblance to the motherland. Many locals don’t consider pizza a “pizza” unless the thick dough is overloaded with exorbitant amounts of cheese. Cosi Mi Piace is changing that notion and making Italy proud. Pizzas are cooked in a wood-fired oven until crunchy, and are loaded with both classic and inventive toppings — like quince and Patagonzola (Gorgonzola from Patagonia); blood sausage and poached egg; and tomato, mozzarella, and spicy longaniza sausage. The rooftop is home to one of the city’s first urban gardens, while the adjoining patio leads to a new artisan chocolate shop.

Allie Lazar

La Carnicería was the first to modernize the holy parrilla in 2014 by putting a twist on classic steakhouse fare. Today, the same young cooks are at it again, this time reinventing Argentina’s favorite street food, the choripán. Affectionately called “chori” for short, the popular sandwich is kind of like an adult hot dog on steroids, consisting of chorizo sausage (chori), bread (pan), and chimichurri sauce. At this new Palermo gastro-pub, which is one of the year’s most anticipated openings, diners can choose from a handful of choripán sandwiches, each made with different types of homemade chorizos, plus local craft beer and award-winning gin-and-tonics.

On Tap

Copy Link

In the not-so-distant past, commercial beer brands like Quilmes and Brahma saturated the city. But the young-yet-flourishing craft beer trend is here to stay, and On Tap is the one-stop shop to try some of the country’s best cervezas. The model might sound simple, but it is somewhat of a novelty in Argentina: 20 craft beers, from small local breweries, all served — yes, you guessed it, on tap. Revelers spill out onto the street, barely making it past the threshold of the standing-room only packed bar. This first location in Palermo had such instant success, three more opened in less than nine months — proving BA loves its beer just as much as Fernet and Malbec.

[Ed note: Since the publication of this map, Soder has sadly closed.]A lone ham leg stabbed with a knife hangs from the ceiling of Söder, an eccentric spot in Palermo that has captured the hearts of adventurous eaters for its bizarre spin on neo-Nordic cuisine. The concept has changed a few times as it finds its niche in BA’s conventional dining world, but continues to maintain a strong point of view with a trashy take on fine dining. Servers in black latex gloves deliver disposable chopsticks or plastic cutlery to the table before announcing that utensils are optional. While dinner’s tasting menu focuses on cured and fermented ingredients, Söder’s recent hype can be attributed to its DJ-blaring “Anti-Sunday” brunch, which has now been extended to Saturdays ,too. Pro trip: If the deer burger is on the menu, order it.

Allie Lazar

Sunae Asian Cantina

Copy Link

Most porteño palates suffer when exposed to mild peppery seasonings, so it can be a challenge finding a place that will really make your teeth sweat. Luckily, we spice addicts have Sunae Cantina to fill our picante void. The former puerta cerrada inside owner Christina Sunae’s home has opened its doors and turned into a full-blown restaurant. The menu features pan-Asian dishes like adobo pork baos with kimchi, fiery homemade curries, and soul-warming pho.

Club de Cocina de Fernando Mayoral

Copy Link

If you’ve done any research on the BA scene, you’ve probably heard about restaurantes a puertas cerradas, AKA closed-door restaurants, a common style of eatery reminiscent of a supper club. Fernando Mayoral, one of the city’s most respected chefs, puts his own spin on the alternative dining concept and hosts a cooking club: an intimate space inside a refurbished Villa Crespo house that offers private dinners, cooking demonstrations, and guest-chef cooking classes. It’s an experience that will give any outsider an intimate look inside the pulsing heart of BA’s culinary world — just make sure to brush up on your Spanish first.

Tierra de Nadie

Copy Link

You’d think that burgers would have always been present in such a carnivorous city, but it wasn’t until recently that hamburguesa hysteria swept through. From pioneers like Palermo’s Burger Joint to chefs like Michelin-starred Mauro Colagreco (who opened Carne in BA’s neighboring city of La Plata), burger spots went from a dozen to the triple digits in a mere couple of years. Tierra de Nadie was one of the first to spread the gospel, and now, the former hole-in-the-wall in the middle of residential Caballito (Tierra de Nadie means “no man’s land” in Spanish) has remodeled, tripling in size and exponentially multiplying in clientele. Burger fanatics flock from across BA and wait for over an hour to snag a table and eat a juicy double bacon cheeseburger. Be sure to keep tabs on the monthly pop-up, where for-one-night-only TDN invites guest chefs to create their own burger.

Kyopo breaks through the barriers of BA’s tight-knit Korean community by introducing Argentina to the art of dak galbi tacos and kimchi burgers and fries. Even though the city has a sizable Korean population, most of its undercover restaurants inside private homes maintain an open discrimination policy: If you don’t look Korean, you simply cannot enter. But Kyopo, which was started by a young Korean-Argentine couple who once lived in Seoul and North America, are attracting all generations of Koreans, Argentines, and kimchi-obsessed expats. Nighttime in the barrio can be a bit shady, so best to head over for lunch and explore an area of BA not typically frequented by tourists.

Heladeria Occo

Copy Link

Ice cream is a year-round obsession in Argentina: Walk down any block and you’ll find a glorious display of helado, served by the cone, cup, and kilo. Occo brings the traditional chocolate and dulce de leche combo to the next level, and this year, due to popular demand, opened two new locations. Try flavors like cream cheese and lemon, alfajores cookies and cream, and coconut with bananas and dulce de leche. Pro tip: Just like most heladerías, Occo delivers ice cream right to your door until midnight for no extra charge.

Pulpería Quilapán

It took Pulpería Quilapán over four years to open to the public, but now, its charming 19th-century mansion (in one of BA’s oldest neighborhoods) triples as a restaurant, general store, and social club. The space first had to be gutted and totally refurbished before its French owners could begin decorating with one-of-a-kind antiques and historical memorabilia. The two patios are prime for warm-weather drinking and an impromptu foosball game. The actual food can be hit or miss (ask for the daily special promos) and servers can have a bit of a ‘tude, but the oasis remains an absolute treasure chest to soak in the cultural history of Buenos Aires. Plus, its social calendar is filled with fun activities.

Los Galgos

Many new coffee shops feel more like Brooklyn than Buenos Aires, but Los Galgos revives the city’s nostalgic café culture for the modern age. This historic corner café and bar in Tribunales, which dates back to the 1930s, suddenly closed last year after changes in management. But it was quickly brought back to life, remodeled, and renovated to appeal to multiple generations. A properly made cortado and warm medialunas attract courthouse workers; a rowdy lunch crowd piles in and fuels up on hearty fried milanesa sandwiches; and cocktail aficionados commute from afar for pre-dinner aperitivos and charcuterie picada platters. It doesn’t get much more “Buenos Aires in the year 2016” than this.

Nueva Casa Japonesa

A few years ago, many would have scoffed at the idea of eating soup as a main meal. But flash-forward in time and the ramen craze has caught BA by slurping storm. On the bottom floor of Nueva Casa Japonesa, you’ll find one of the only meccas in the city with imported Japanese products. Then, walk upstairs and enter a haven for the Japanese community, who are face-deep in comforting bowls of udon and ramen soups.

Allie Lazar

Proper Restaurant

Proper became an instant hit the day it opened. A crew of young seasoned cooks flip familiar Argentine ingredients on their head to create a cohesive line-up of small plates that change daily. The industrial vibe of the former mechanic garage is warmed by the heart of the project, an impressive custom-built wood-fired oven that incubates dishes like pork flank with red bean ketchup, smoked sweet potato with blue cheese, and halloumi provoleta dressed in a date vinaigrette. Go with a group, take over the long communal table, and order everything — making sure to save room for dessert, banana split pie and flan with dulce de leche.

Cosi Mi Piace

Even though more than half of all Argentines are of Italian descent, Buenos Aires-style pizza shows little resemblance to the motherland. Many locals don’t consider pizza a “pizza” unless the thick dough is overloaded with exorbitant amounts of cheese. Cosi Mi Piace is changing that notion and making Italy proud. Pizzas are cooked in a wood-fired oven until crunchy, and are loaded with both classic and inventive toppings — like quince and Patagonzola (Gorgonzola from Patagonia); blood sausage and poached egg; and tomato, mozzarella, and spicy longaniza sausage. The rooftop is home to one of the city’s first urban gardens, while the adjoining patio leads to a new artisan chocolate shop.

Allie Lazar

Chori

La Carnicería was the first to modernize the holy parrilla in 2014 by putting a twist on classic steakhouse fare. Today, the same young cooks are at it again, this time reinventing Argentina’s favorite street food, the choripán. Affectionately called “chori” for short, the popular sandwich is kind of like an adult hot dog on steroids, consisting of chorizo sausage (chori), bread (pan), and chimichurri sauce. At this new Palermo gastro-pub, which is one of the year’s most anticipated openings, diners can choose from a handful of choripán sandwiches, each made with different types of homemade chorizos, plus local craft beer and award-winning gin-and-tonics.

On Tap

In the not-so-distant past, commercial beer brands like Quilmes and Brahma saturated the city. But the young-yet-flourishing craft beer trend is here to stay, and On Tap is the one-stop shop to try some of the country’s best cervezas. The model might sound simple, but it is somewhat of a novelty in Argentina: 20 craft beers, from small local breweries, all served — yes, you guessed it, on tap. Revelers spill out onto the street, barely making it past the threshold of the standing-room only packed bar. This first location in Palermo had such instant success, three more opened in less than nine months — proving BA loves its beer just as much as Fernet and Malbec.

Söder

[Ed note: Since the publication of this map, Soder has sadly closed.]A lone ham leg stabbed with a knife hangs from the ceiling of Söder, an eccentric spot in Palermo that has captured the hearts of adventurous eaters for its bizarre spin on neo-Nordic cuisine. The concept has changed a few times as it finds its niche in BA’s conventional dining world, but continues to maintain a strong point of view with a trashy take on fine dining. Servers in black latex gloves deliver disposable chopsticks or plastic cutlery to the table before announcing that utensils are optional. While dinner’s tasting menu focuses on cured and fermented ingredients, Söder’s recent hype can be attributed to its DJ-blaring “Anti-Sunday” brunch, which has now been extended to Saturdays ,too. Pro trip: If the deer burger is on the menu, order it.

Allie Lazar

Sunae Asian Cantina

Most porteño palates suffer when exposed to mild peppery seasonings, so it can be a challenge finding a place that will really make your teeth sweat. Luckily, we spice addicts have Sunae Cantina to fill our picante void. The former puerta cerrada inside owner Christina Sunae’s home has opened its doors and turned into a full-blown restaurant. The menu features pan-Asian dishes like adobo pork baos with kimchi, fiery homemade curries, and soul-warming pho.

Club de Cocina de Fernando Mayoral

If you’ve done any research on the BA scene, you’ve probably heard about restaurantes a puertas cerradas, AKA closed-door restaurants, a common style of eatery reminiscent of a supper club. Fernando Mayoral, one of the city’s most respected chefs, puts his own spin on the alternative dining concept and hosts a cooking club: an intimate space inside a refurbished Villa Crespo house that offers private dinners, cooking demonstrations, and guest-chef cooking classes. It’s an experience that will give any outsider an intimate look inside the pulsing heart of BA’s culinary world — just make sure to brush up on your Spanish first.

Tierra de Nadie

You’d think that burgers would have always been present in such a carnivorous city, but it wasn’t until recently that hamburguesa hysteria swept through. From pioneers like Palermo’s Burger Joint to chefs like Michelin-starred Mauro Colagreco (who opened Carne in BA’s neighboring city of La Plata), burger spots went from a dozen to the triple digits in a mere couple of years. Tierra de Nadie was one of the first to spread the gospel, and now, the former hole-in-the-wall in the middle of residential Caballito (Tierra de Nadie means “no man’s land” in Spanish) has remodeled, tripling in size and exponentially multiplying in clientele. Burger fanatics flock from across BA and wait for over an hour to snag a table and eat a juicy double bacon cheeseburger. Be sure to keep tabs on the monthly pop-up, where for-one-night-only TDN invites guest chefs to create their own burger.

Kyopo

Kyopo breaks through the barriers of BA’s tight-knit Korean community by introducing Argentina to the art of dak galbi tacos and kimchi burgers and fries. Even though the city has a sizable Korean population, most of its undercover restaurants inside private homes maintain an open discrimination policy: If you don’t look Korean, you simply cannot enter. But Kyopo, which was started by a young Korean-Argentine couple who once lived in Seoul and North America, are attracting all generations of Koreans, Argentines, and kimchi-obsessed expats. Nighttime in the barrio can be a bit shady, so best to head over for lunch and explore an area of BA not typically frequented by tourists.

Heladeria Occo

Ice cream is a year-round obsession in Argentina: Walk down any block and you’ll find a glorious display of helado, served by the cone, cup, and kilo. Occo brings the traditional chocolate and dulce de leche combo to the next level, and this year, due to popular demand, opened two new locations. Try flavors like cream cheese and lemon, alfajores cookies and cream, and coconut with bananas and dulce de leche. Pro tip: Just like most heladerías, Occo delivers ice cream right to your door until midnight for no extra charge.

Related Maps