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The 15 Hottest New Restaurants in Buenos Aires

Where to find cheesy empanadas, warm pão de quejo (Brazilian cheese bread), and prime Argentinian beef straight from the parrilla in the Argentinian capital.

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Once again, Eater heads to Buenos Aires, Argentina, to discover the buzziest spots for eating and drinking. Offering her picks for the best the city has to offer right now is writer and Pick Up the Fork founder Allie Lazar.

For decades, Argentina’s economy has struggled with inflation, but when the exchange rate jumped from 20 to 39 pesos to the dollar this year, food costs soared, making opening a restaurant even more complicated. Still, renowned chefs like Narda Lepes and Gastón Acurio brought highly anticipated ventures to Buenos Aires, packing the house with their unique style of cooking.

Among the latest BA food trends:

  • The 20-something chef generation, like the cooks at Anafe, focus on small plates in more casual settings rather than high-end tasting menus.
  • The city has seen an overall shift from food to drinks, with more and more emphasis on craft beer, wine, vermouth, and specialty coffee.
  • Palermo is no longer the only culinary hot spot: bordering neighborhoods like Chacarita, Colegiales, and Villa Crespo are also experiencing a boom.

BA will always be about the beef, so for steakhouse and must-eats guidance, check out Eater’s 38 Essential Buenos Aires Restaurants. Without further ado, and in geographic order, the Eater Heatmap to Buenos Aires.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Lardo & Rosemary

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Av. del Libertador 3810, B1637ALU La Lucila
Buenos Aires, Argentina

There aren’t many exciting options in BA’s northern suburbs, but now Lardo & Rosemary has become the jewel of La Lucila in Zona Norte. The self-service gastro bar doesn’t serve just one style of food: Here, diners order from a short list of street food-inspired dishes from around the world. Go with a group and order a spread to share, with selections such as burrata and sourdough bread, lettuce with gochujang dressing and crunchy fried onions, crispy sweetbread and chitlin cabbage wrap, roasted eggplant satay, and churros for dessert.

Lardo & Rosemary
Lardo & Rosemary/Facebook

2. Narda Comedor

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C1428DUB, Mariscal Antonio José de Sucre 664
C1428DUB CABA, Argentina
011 15-6131-0664
Visit Website

Narda Lepes, a household name in Argentina, stars in cooking and travel shows, writes cookbooks, has her own line of supermarket products and kitchen appliances, and now adds restauranteur to her repertoire. Narda Comedor, her mess-hall motif restaurant in Bajo Belgrano, opened in October 2017, puts vegetables on the main stage, particularly seasonal produce inspired by Lepes’s travels across Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. A talented crew of young cooks serve all-day dishes — for breakfast, lunch, merienda (tea time), and dinner — reminiscent of Californian cuisine.

The dining room at Narda Comedor
Photo: Narda Comedor

3. Corte Comedor

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Migueletes 2301, C1428ASK C1428ASK
Buenos Aires, Argentina
4781-2166

We all know Argentina is a carnivorous country, so it’s a big deal when the city’s most talked-about butcher shop opens an adjacent restaurant. Even though chef (and Francis Mallmann disciple) Santiago Garat constantly changes the menu, you can expect him to masterfully serve cuts like sirloin, skirt steak, ribeye, and pork loin straight from the front-and-center parrilla (grill). Don’t miss the spicy lamb merguez sausage starter or seasonal vegetable side dishes. When you’re done, make sure to hop next door to the carnicería and window-shop all of the sausages, pork and beef cuts, and dry-aged beef. Corte opens daily for lunch.

4. Öss Kaffe

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Franklin D. Roosevelt
Buenos Aires, Argentina
011 15-4490-3700
Visit Website

When you arrive at Öss Kaffe in residential Belgrano, Fernando Iglesias Molli will probably ask you if this is your first visit, then ask whether you are familiar with specialty coffee. The architect- and artist-turned-barista transformed his 20-square-meter home garage into a 10-seat cafe. Go for breakfast or merienda (“snack time,” occurring roughly between 4 and 7 p.m.) and pair your coffee with pão de quejo (Brazilian cheese bread), sourdough toast, or cocadas (similar to coconut macaroons), made fresh by Molli’s family and neighbors. Before you trek up north, check Öss Kaffe’s hours, since it closes for siesta between noon and 4 p.m.

ÖSS Kaffe
ÖSS Kaffe/Facebook

5. Strange Brewing

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Delgado 658
C1426BDH CABA, Argentina

For decades, beer drinkers in Buenos Aires almost exclusively consumed Quilmes, the national brand. But in recent years, the city has seen an artisanal beer boom of epic proportions. There may be dozens of solid cervecerías in every barrio, but few are quite as welcoming as Strange Brewing. The large warehouse includes a microbrewery, taproom bar, beer garden, and open kitchen. The space fills up almost every night, but maintains a low-key atmosphere. A rotating selection of about 10 beers — including IPA, pale ale, amber and dunkel — change regularly. Even though Strange opened in September 2017, the eclectic food menu has substantially evolved over the past 12 months, especially when guest chefs began hosting pop-ups, serving anything from tacos to seasonal goulash and lentil stew to Texas-style barbecue.

One of Strange Brewing’s signature beers
Strange Brewing/Facebook

6. Anafe

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Av. Dorrego 1650, C1427 CCN
Buenos Aires, Argentina

If you’ve read a Buenos Aires guidebook published in the past decade, you’ve probably noticed the “Puertas Cerradas” box recommending the intimate multicourse dinners inside private homes that were once all the rage. Today, times have changed, and fresh young minds are transforming the “closed door” supper-club concept. After organizing pop-ups in kitchens across BA, freshman chefs Mica Najmanovich and Nico Arcucci settled on the eighth floor of a high-rise on the Palermo-Colegiales-Chacarita border, complete with an outdoor terrace overlooking the Dorrego Flea Market. The vibe might be laid back, but the masterful dishes reinterpreting Eastern European, Italian, and Middle Eastern cuisines are anything but relaxed, and each small plate emphasizes texture, freshness, and flavor. Vegetarians won’t leave hungry either, since more than half of the menu is meat-free. The wine list features an excellent selection of boutique wines, like the orange torrontés and chardonnay blend from Pielihueso. Anafe serves dinner Thursdays through Saturdays, offers a fixed-price all-you-can-eat brunch buffet on Sundays, and regularly uses the space for gastronomic events and pop-ups.

Fresh pasta at Anafe
Anafe/Facebook

7. La Fuerza

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Av. Dorrego 1409, C1414CKJ C1414CKJ
Buenos Aires, Argentina

On a breezy corner in up-and-coming Chacarita, La Fuerza keeps Argentina’s aperitivo history alive with a contemporary take on vermouth bars. Come for the vermú, available on tap in white and red, made with grapes from Sebastián Zuccardi’s Mendoza winery and a selection of native herbs, spices, and flowers from the foothills of the Andes Mountains. The food doesn’t disappoint either, especially for those in search of true Porteño nostalgia on a plate, like the fainazzeta rellena, a mashup of fainá (chickpea cake) and fugazzeta (a sauceless onion and cheese pizza); tortilla de papa (Spanish omelet); and milanesa con fritas a caballo (schnitzel with fries and fried eggs).

Seasonal asparagus and chistorra from La Fuerza
Vermú La Fuerza/Facebook

8. Niño Gordo

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Thames 1810, C1414DDL C1414DDL
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Perhaps the city’s unconditional love for beef and recent Asian fusion obsession explain the difficulty of snagging a reservation at this pan-Asian style parrilla where Japanese, Korean, and Chinese flavors meet Argentine traditions. Niño Gordo, which means “Fat Boy” in English, is the newest venture from Pedro Peño and Germán Sitz, the creators of Palermo favorites La Carnicería and Chori. Sit at the bar for a great view of the open kitchen and watch chefs plate dishes like miso-chile glazed sweetbreads, chinchulines (chitterlings) okonomiyaki, beef tataki with wasabi, and ssamjang sirloin. Much of the hotness factor can be attributed to the decor: At the restaurant’s entrance, two fish tanks with floating faux jellyfish open onto an intimate dining area whose ceiling is decorated with 143 red chochin lanterns, making Niño Gordo a contender for 2018’s most Instagrammable restaurant.

Lanterns hang from the ceiling at Niño Gordo
Allie Lazar

9. Sheikob's Bagels

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Uriarte 1386, C1414DAL C1414DAL
Buenos Aires, Argentina

A John Starks New York Knicks jersey and framed Nas autograph that reads “The Sky’s the Limit” decorate Sheikob’s Bagels, the city’s first real bagel shop. Before native New Yorker Jake Eichenbaum-Pikser took to the streets in 2014, selling the real boiled and baked variety off of his bicycle outside specialty coffee shops, bagels in Buenos Aires meant disappointing bread with a hole in the middle. Last December, Sheikob’s (how Porteños pronounce Jacob) went brick-and-mortar, serving fresh bagel sandwiches to homesick expats and curious Argentines. Try combinations like the Clásico, with homemade cream cheese, smoked salmon, pickled onions and capers; the BEC, with bacon, egg, and cheese; the Mexicano, with jalapeno cream cheese and roasted tomato with cilantro; and the Brighton, topped with lemon-dill cream cheese and pickled beets.  

10. Vico

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Gurruchaga 1149
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Argentina is known for its wines, but it’s not easy to find a wine bar here with an extensive selection by the glass. At Vico in Villa Crespo, patrons can taste more than 140 different bottles — on tap from wine dispensers, a novelty in Buenos Aires. Go beyond Argentina’s flagship malbec and discover a mundo of Patagonian pinot noir and torrontés from Salta. The interactive set-up makes it an ideal icebreaker for a first date, or for a group of friends who want to try a multitude of wines. Just make sure to secure your glass under the spout to avoid any embarrassing spillage situations.

The on-tap wine offerings at Vico
Allie Lazar

11. El Santa Evita

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Julián Álvarez 1479
C1414 CABA, Argentina

Florencia Barrientos Paz and Gonzalo Alderete Pagés shocked the local food scene when they suddenly left Peronist-themed restaurant Perón Perón after a dispute with their partners. Only a few months later, they have returned, this time honoring Evita Perón and Argentine comfort foods. Start the meal with an assortment of Gonzalo’s salteña-style empanadas, like the braised venison with homemade hot sauces. After, opt for stick-to-your ribs plates like milanesa with spaghetti, ossobuco and mashed potatoes, and finally, for dessert, Florencia’s famous flan with dulce de leche and whipped cream. Reservations highly recommended.

Empanadas at El Santa Evita
Allie Lazar

12. Tanta Argentina by Gastón Acurio

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Esmeralda 938, C1057 C1007ABL
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Peruvian culinary mogul Gastón Acurio knows a thing or two about the restaurant industry. After the success of ceviche sanctuary La Mar Buenos Aires, the Acurio group decided to show Porteños the ways of Peruvian home cooking. Unlike Tanta in Peru, Chile, and Chicago, Argentina’s upscale downtown location caters to the office crowd. Here, you will find Tanta’s twist on power lunch staples like empanadas, salads, burgers, and sandwiches, plus the real magic, the comforting soul foods. Go with a group to maximize how many family-style dishes you can order, starting with specialties like lomo saltado, ají de gallina, papas rellenas, and causas. For those with a big appetite, try El Bife de Anthony El Goloso, which roughly translates as “Anthony the Glutton’s Beef,” named after head chef Anthony Vasquez and consisting of a 500-gram steak served with pesto fettuccine and creamy huacaína potatoes. Tanta is such a hit in Buenos Aires, there are already plans for expansion.

Anticuchos limeños de corazón at Tanta Argentina
Tanta Argentina/Facebook

13. Kinky

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AON, Vera 662
C1414 CABA, Argentina
2141-2756

Often times the best place to go for a cocktail in a new city isn’t the spot with the line out the door or the too-cool-for-school bar where it’s impossible to get the bartender’s attention. You want to find out where the gastro industry goes. Unmarked on a quiet street in Villa Crespo, Kinky was inspired by bar patron-turned-bartender Luis Redondo’s favorite music. Half of the menu consists of signature “Playlist” cocktails, named after hits by David Bowie, the Sex Pistols, Billy Idol, and Blondie, while the other half, the “Covers,” were created by esteemed local bartenders, who often stop by for a drink. Food is limited to potato chips and empanadas, so plan ahead.

14. Tintoreria Yafuso

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Juan Ramirez de Velasco 399
C1414 CABA, Argentina
011 2136-6922

A few months ago the dry cleaner on the corner of Velasco and Araoz suddenly closed after more than 30 years of business. But last month, Fabián Yafuso re-opened his family’s tintorería as a 10-seat casual Japanese restaurant. Try dishes like grilled fish, tempura, and fresh sushi and sashimi platters. If you don’t make a reservation, there probably won’t be room at the counter, which offers two seatings every night at 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m.

15. Nilson

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Carlos Calvo 463
C1102 CABA, Argentina
011 5664-5430

It took dozens of visits to the Mercado de San Telmo before sommelier Samantha Nilson could find information on how to open a space in the market. Until finally, one lucky day, she saw a for rent sign on a tiny kiosk and landed the dream location for her first wine bar. Every month Nilson changes the carefully selected wine list to feature a handful of Argentina’s best bottles, which are available by the glass. The food menu keeps it simple with sandwiches (on Salvaje Bakery sourdough) and local cheeses. Drinkers don’t just have to sip in the bar: The laid-back vibe encourages guests to walk around the mercado or spill out onto the sidewalk and interact with barrio locals.

Nilson wine bar

1. Lardo & Rosemary

Av. del Libertador 3810, B1637ALU La Lucila, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Lardo & Rosemary
Lardo & Rosemary/Facebook

There aren’t many exciting options in BA’s northern suburbs, but now Lardo & Rosemary has become the jewel of La Lucila in Zona Norte. The self-service gastro bar doesn’t serve just one style of food: Here, diners order from a short list of street food-inspired dishes from around the world. Go with a group and order a spread to share, with selections such as burrata and sourdough bread, lettuce with gochujang dressing and crunchy fried onions, crispy sweetbread and chitlin cabbage wrap, roasted eggplant satay, and churros for dessert.

Av. del Libertador 3810, B1637ALU La Lucila
Buenos Aires, Argentina

2. Narda Comedor

C1428DUB, Mariscal Antonio José de Sucre 664, C1428DUB CABA, Argentina
The dining room at Narda Comedor
Photo: Narda Comedor

Narda Lepes, a household name in Argentina, stars in cooking and travel shows, writes cookbooks, has her own line of supermarket products and kitchen appliances, and now adds restauranteur to her repertoire. Narda Comedor, her mess-hall motif restaurant in Bajo Belgrano, opened in October 2017, puts vegetables on the main stage, particularly seasonal produce inspired by Lepes’s travels across Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. A talented crew of young cooks serve all-day dishes — for breakfast, lunch, merienda (tea time), and dinner — reminiscent of Californian cuisine.

C1428DUB, Mariscal Antonio José de Sucre 664
C1428DUB CABA, Argentina

3. Corte Comedor

Migueletes 2301, C1428ASK C1428ASK, Buenos Aires, Argentina

We all know Argentina is a carnivorous country, so it’s a big deal when the city’s most talked-about butcher shop opens an adjacent restaurant. Even though chef (and Francis Mallmann disciple) Santiago Garat constantly changes the menu, you can expect him to masterfully serve cuts like sirloin, skirt steak, ribeye, and pork loin straight from the front-and-center parrilla (grill). Don’t miss the spicy lamb merguez sausage starter or seasonal vegetable side dishes. When you’re done, make sure to hop next door to the carnicería and window-shop all of the sausages, pork and beef cuts, and dry-aged beef. Corte opens daily for lunch.

Migueletes 2301, C1428ASK C1428ASK
Buenos Aires, Argentina

4. Öss Kaffe

Franklin D. Roosevelt, Buenos Aires, Argentina
ÖSS Kaffe
ÖSS Kaffe/Facebook

When you arrive at Öss Kaffe in residential Belgrano, Fernando Iglesias Molli will probably ask you if this is your first visit, then ask whether you are familiar with specialty coffee. The architect- and artist-turned-barista transformed his 20-square-meter home garage into a 10-seat cafe. Go for breakfast or merienda (“snack time,” occurring roughly between 4 and 7 p.m.) and pair your coffee with pão de quejo (Brazilian cheese bread), sourdough toast, or cocadas (similar to coconut macaroons), made fresh by Molli’s family and neighbors. Before you trek up north, check Öss Kaffe’s hours, since it closes for siesta between noon and 4 p.m.

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Buenos Aires, Argentina

5. Strange Brewing

Delgado 658, C1426BDH CABA, Argentina
One of Strange Brewing’s signature beers
Strange Brewing/Facebook

For decades, beer drinkers in Buenos Aires almost exclusively consumed Quilmes, the national brand. But in recent years, the city has seen an artisanal beer boom of epic proportions. There may be dozens of solid cervecerías in every barrio, but few are quite as welcoming as Strange Brewing. The large warehouse includes a microbrewery, taproom bar, beer garden, and open kitchen. The space fills up almost every night, but maintains a low-key atmosphere. A rotating selection of about 10 beers — including IPA, pale ale, amber and dunkel — change regularly. Even though Strange opened in September 2017, the eclectic food menu has substantially evolved over the past 12 months, especially when guest chefs began hosting pop-ups, serving anything from tacos to seasonal goulash and lentil stew to Texas-style barbecue.

Delgado 658
C1426BDH CABA, Argentina

6. Anafe

Av. Dorrego 1650, C1427 CCN, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Fresh pasta at Anafe
Anafe/Facebook

If you’ve read a Buenos Aires guidebook published in the past decade, you’ve probably noticed the “Puertas Cerradas” box recommending the intimate multicourse dinners inside private homes that were once all the rage. Today, times have changed, and fresh young minds are transforming the “closed door” supper-club concept. After organizing pop-ups in kitchens across BA, freshman chefs Mica Najmanovich and Nico Arcucci settled on the eighth floor of a high-rise on the Palermo-Colegiales-Chacarita border, complete with an outdoor terrace overlooking the Dorrego Flea Market. The vibe might be laid back, but the masterful dishes reinterpreting Eastern European, Italian, and Middle Eastern cuisines are anything but relaxed, and each small plate emphasizes texture, freshness, and flavor. Vegetarians won’t leave hungry either, since more than half of the menu is meat-free. The wine list features an excellent selection of boutique wines, like the orange torrontés and chardonnay blend from Pielihueso. Anafe serves dinner Thursdays through Saturdays, offers a fixed-price all-you-can-eat brunch buffet on Sundays, and regularly uses the space for gastronomic events and pop-ups.

Av. Dorrego 1650, C1427 CCN
Buenos Aires, Argentina

7. La Fuerza

Av. Dorrego 1409, C1414CKJ C1414CKJ, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Seasonal asparagus and chistorra from La Fuerza
Vermú La Fuerza/Facebook

On a breezy corner in up-and-coming Chacarita, La Fuerza keeps Argentina’s aperitivo history alive with a contemporary take on vermouth bars. Come for the vermú, available on tap in white and red, made with grapes from Sebastián Zuccardi’s Mendoza winery and a selection of native herbs, spices, and flowers from the foothills of the Andes Mountains. The food doesn’t disappoint either, especially for those in search of true Porteño nostalgia on a plate, like the fainazzeta rellena, a mashup of fainá (chickpea cake) and fugazzeta (a sauceless onion and cheese pizza); tortilla de papa (Spanish omelet); and milanesa con fritas a caballo (schnitzel with fries and fried eggs).

Av. Dorrego 1409, C1414CKJ C1414CKJ
Buenos Aires, Argentina

8. Niño Gordo

Thames 1810, C1414DDL C1414DDL, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Lanterns hang from the ceiling at Niño Gordo
Allie Lazar

Perhaps the city’s unconditional love for beef and recent Asian fusion obsession explain the difficulty of snagging a reservation at this pan-Asian style parrilla where Japanese, Korean, and Chinese flavors meet Argentine traditions. Niño Gordo, which means “Fat Boy” in English, is the newest venture from Pedro Peño and Germán Sitz, the creators of Palermo favorites La Carnicería and Chori. Sit at the bar for a great view of the open kitchen and watch chefs plate dishes like miso-chile glazed sweetbreads, chinchulines (chitterlings) okonomiyaki, beef tataki with wasabi, and ssamjang sirloin. Much of the hotness factor can be attributed to the decor: At the restaurant’s entrance, two fish tanks with floating faux jellyfish open onto an intimate dining area whose ceiling is decorated with 143 red chochin lanterns, making Niño Gordo a contender for 2018’s most Instagrammable restaurant.

Thames 1810, C1414DDL C1414DDL
Buenos Aires, Argentina

9. Sheikob's Bagels

Uriarte 1386, C1414DAL C1414DAL, Buenos Aires, Argentina

A John Starks New York Knicks jersey and framed Nas autograph that reads “The Sky’s the Limit” decorate Sheikob’s Bagels, the city’s first real bagel shop. Before native New Yorker Jake Eichenbaum-Pikser took to the streets in 2014, selling the real boiled and baked variety off of his bicycle outside specialty coffee shops, bagels in Buenos Aires meant disappointing bread with a hole in the middle. Last December, Sheikob’s (how Porteños pronounce Jacob) went brick-and-mortar, serving fresh bagel sandwiches to homesick expats and curious Argentines. Try combinations like the Clásico, with homemade cream cheese, smoked salmon, pickled onions and capers; the BEC, with bacon, egg, and cheese; the Mexicano, with jalapeno cream cheese and roasted tomato with cilantro; and the Brighton, topped with lemon-dill cream cheese and pickled beets.  

Uriarte 1386, C1414DAL C1414DAL
Buenos Aires, Argentina

10. Vico

Gurruchaga 1149, Buenos Aires, Argentina
The on-tap wine offerings at Vico
Allie Lazar

Argentina is known for its wines, but it’s not easy to find a wine bar here with an extensive selection by the glass. At Vico in Villa Crespo, patrons can taste more than 140 different bottles — on tap from wine dispensers, a novelty in Buenos Aires. Go beyond Argentina’s flagship malbec and discover a mundo of Patagonian pinot noir and torrontés from Salta. The interactive set-up makes it an ideal icebreaker for a first date, or for a group of friends who want to try a multitude of wines. Just make sure to secure your glass under the spout to avoid any embarrassing spillage situations.

Gurruchaga 1149
Buenos Aires, Argentina

11. El Santa Evita

Julián Álvarez 1479, C1414 CABA, Argentina
Empanadas at El Santa Evita
Allie Lazar

Florencia Barrientos Paz and Gonzalo Alderete Pagés shocked the local food scene when they suddenly left Peronist-themed restaurant Perón Perón after a dispute with their partners. Only a few months later, they have returned, this time honoring Evita Perón and Argentine comfort foods. Start the meal with an assortment of Gonzalo’s salteña-style empanadas, like the braised venison with homemade hot sauces. After, opt for stick-to-your ribs plates like milanesa with spaghetti, ossobuco and mashed potatoes, and finally, for dessert, Florencia’s famous flan with dulce de leche and whipped cream. Reservations highly recommended.

Julián Álvarez 1479
C1414 CABA, Argentina

12. Tanta Argentina by Gastón Acurio

Esmeralda 938, C1057 C1007ABL, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Anticuchos limeños de corazón at Tanta Argentina
Tanta Argentina/Facebook

Peruvian culinary mogul Gastón Acurio knows a thing or two about the restaurant industry. After the success of ceviche sanctuary La Mar Buenos Aires, the Acurio group decided to show Porteños the ways of Peruvian home cooking. Unlike Tanta in Peru, Chile, and Chicago, Argentina’s upscale downtown location caters to the office crowd. Here, you will find Tanta’s twist on power lunch staples like empanadas, salads, burgers, and sandwiches, plus the real magic, the comforting soul foods. Go with a group to maximize how many family-style dishes you can order, starting with specialties like lomo saltado, ají de gallina, papas rellenas, and causas. For those with a big appetite, try El Bife de Anthony El Goloso, which roughly translates as “Anthony the Glutton’s Beef,” named after head chef Anthony Vasquez and consisting of a 500-gram steak served with pesto fettuccine and creamy huacaína potatoes. Tanta is such a hit in Buenos Aires, there are already plans for expansion.

Esmeralda 938, C1057 C1007ABL
Buenos Aires, Argentina

13. Kinky

AON, Vera 662, C1414 CABA, Argentina

Often times the best place to go for a cocktail in a new city isn’t the spot with the line out the door or the too-cool-for-school bar where it’s impossible to get the bartender’s attention. You want to find out where the gastro industry goes. Unmarked on a quiet street in Villa Crespo, Kinky was inspired by bar patron-turned-bartender Luis Redondo’s favorite music. Half of the menu consists of signature “Playlist” cocktails, named after hits by David Bowie, the Sex Pistols, Billy Idol, and Blondie, while the other half, the “Covers,” were created by esteemed local bartenders, who often stop by for a drink. Food is limited to potato chips and empanadas, so plan ahead.

AON, Vera 662
C1414 CABA, Argentina

14. Tintoreria Yafuso

Juan Ramirez de Velasco 399, C1414 CABA, Argentina

A few months ago the dry cleaner on the corner of Velasco and Araoz suddenly closed after more than 30 years of business. But last month, Fabián Yafuso re-opened his family’s tintorería as a 10-seat casual Japanese restaurant. Try dishes like grilled fish, tempura, and fresh sushi and sashimi platters. If you don’t make a reservation, there probably won’t be room at the counter, which offers two seatings every night at 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m.

Juan Ramirez de Velasco 399
C1414 CABA, Argentina

15. Nilson

Carlos Calvo 463, C1102 CABA, Argentina
Nilson wine bar

It took dozens of visits to the Mercado de San Telmo before sommelier Samantha Nilson could find information on how to open a space in the market. Until finally, one lucky day, she saw a for rent sign on a tiny kiosk and landed the dream location for her first wine bar. Every month Nilson changes the carefully selected wine list to feature a handful of Argentina’s best bottles, which are available by the glass. The food menu keeps it simple with sandwiches (on Salvaje Bakery sourdough) and local cheeses. Drinkers don’t just have to sip in the bar: The laid-back vibe encourages guests to walk around the mercado or spill out onto the sidewalk and interact with barrio locals.

Carlos Calvo 463
C1102 CABA, Argentina

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