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Rice with artichokes and clams at Fismuler
Photo: Fismuler/Facebook

The 13 Hottest New Restaurants in Barcelona

Where to find loaded Spanish rice, Peruvian ceviche, and all the jamón Ibérico

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Rice with artichokes and clams at Fismuler
| Photo: Fismuler/Facebook

Today, Eater returns to Barcelona, Spain, to focus on 13 of the city’s hottest newcomers. Once again, Barcelona-based food writer Isabel Conde shares her picks for the most popular openings of the last 12 months or so.

“All big cities have restaurants opening nonstop, but in Barcelona the scene is especially competitive,” says Conde. Among her picks, a new branch of a Madrid favorite (Fismuler), a celebration of one of the world’s most ancient grains (Rice!), and a cevicheria from a Peruvian legend (Yakumanka).

Here then, without further ado, is the Eater Heatmap to Barcelona.

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SOFIA Be So Gastronomic Restaurant

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Chef Carles Tejedor (El Nacional, the Academy, and others) is behind the timeless Be So, which specializes in haute versions of hotel-dining-room classics like steak tartare and oysters. The restaurant’s wine presentation is unique: Pick a favorite scent from one of seven small perfume bottles, and the sommelier will recommend a handful different wines to match. Be So shares the Hotel Sofia with three other worthy newcomers, including the Mediterranean restaurant Impar, the library-themed book cafe PhiloSofia, and the Zuu dinner theater.

Cherry gazpacho with king crab at Be So
Photo: Be So/Facebook

Cocina Hermanos Torres

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Located in a nearly 9,000-square-foot industrial warehouse, this mammoth restaurant is the personal passion project of celebrity-chef brothers Sergio and Javier Torres. Both chefs recently received their second Michelin star for Dos Cielos, and now they’ve bet big on a restaurant that impresses both architecturally and culinarily. Here the Torres brothers pay playful tribute to the recipes of their mother and grandmother, with surprising dishes like sunflower-seed ice cream and a a faux “rice” with vegetables.

Cocina Hermanos Torres
Photo: Cocina Hermanos Torres/Facebook

El Cinco

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Located in a former nightclub venue, El Cinco is chef Josep Armenteros’s Barcelona debut. The menu draws on the chef’s devotion to seasonality as well as his experience working with Michelin-starred chef Carles Gaig. Don’t miss the boneless duck with pears and millet, the partridge with cabbage, and the menorquin de ensaimada (a typical brioche from Balear Islands) with sobrassada (Majorcan sausage) and cheese. The menu is heavy on vegetables, and don’t sleep on dessert. Stick around after dinner — the nightclub El 5 is just downstairs in the basement.

Fish at El Cinco
Photo: El Cinco Facebook

RICE! by Sanchez Romera

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Sánchez Romera left his career as a neurologist to follow his dream of becoming a chef. His unconventional path, which included a stint at New York’s Dream Hotel, led him to open Rice!, a colorful restaurant based around the staple grain. Multi-textured rice varieties are the star of unique dishes like black rice with curry prawns, cuttlefish, and kombu velouté, and the Barcelona rollsix maki rolls made with different rices and filled with an array of vegetables and seafood.

Rice! by Sanchez Romera
Photo: Rice by Sánchez Romera/Facebook

Plata Bistro

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The chefs at Plata Bistro strive to keep the dishes simple. Very simple. Each traditional stew has only three ingredients, but through clever techniques and seasonal ingredients, the minimalist dishes have mass appeal. The menu, which changes continually, is projected on the dining room wall with slides showcasing the day’s options, made with ingredients sourced from the local farmers market. Think chanterelles with a fried egg, chicken with Swiss chard and foie gras, or fresh strawberries with mascarpone and balsamic.

Salad at Plata Bistro
Photo: Plata Bistro/Facebook

Yakumanka

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Chef-owner Gastón Acurio is Peru’s most famous culinary ambassador, and arguably the driving force behind the world’s sudden obsession with Peruvian ceviche. Yakumanka is inspired by Acurio’s internationally successful La Mar concept, and the menu here features some of that restaurant’s best ceviches, including Carretillero made with mussels, shrimp, crab, and tiger milk (a citrus-based marinade) and apaltado with avocado and grilled octopus.

Ceviche at Yakumanka
Photo: Yankumanka/Facebook

Pur Restaurant

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Michelin-starred chef Nandu Jubany is behind Pur (Catalan for “pure”), where little distracts from the integrity of the ingredients. The kitchen sits on display in the center of the restaurant, so diners can watch as chefs prepare dishes like bone marrow with caviar, escala anchovies atop stracciatella, and salt-cured tuna belly with toasted almond ajoblanco. Head downstairs for a nightcap at the cheekily named basement cocktail bar, Impur.  

Pur Barcelona
Photo: Pur Barcelona/Facebook

Restaurante Xavier Pellicer

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According to acclaimed chef Xavier Pellicer, all ingredients possess an energy that gets passed directly from purveyor to cook to diner. This is what he aims to capture on the plate at his latest eponymous restaurant. With a staunch emphasis on biodynamic and organic practices, this flexitarian restaurant reveres vegetables without snubbing the occasional bit of fish or meat. Pellicer has revived some of the classic dishes that made him famous, like a beetroot gazpacho and pink lentil hummus, but you’ll also find new hits, like a roasted pumpkin with chutney and burrata with asparagus and citrus.

Restaurane Xavier Pellicer
Photo: Xavier Pellicer/Facebook

Al Kostat

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Located in the basement of the Moritz brewery and sharing a space with the Michelin-starred restaurant Alkimia, Al Kostat (which means “next door” in Catalan) is the playground of chef Jordi Vilà, who cooks up a large menu of approachable, affordable dishes. A handful of tables make up the dining room, where diners enjoy everything from simple meat croquettes to little luxuries like shrimp heads with caviar.

The dining room Al Kostat
Photo: Al Kostat/Facebook

My Fucking Restaurant

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There’s more to this enterprise than its unsubtle name. Two Italian slow-food devotees are behind the well-designed spot, complete with a dining room-adjacent courtyard for growing fresh herbs. The food mixes the chefs’ Italian heritage with more modernist sensibilities. Try the Parmesan crispy taco and the restaurant’s signature version of the classic patatas bravas, here called “Bravas que querían ser patatas” (bravas that dreamed of becoming chips). They are indeed a dream.

Restaurante A

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In a city whose restaurant scene has been long ruled by the avant-garde, chef Alain Guiard has turned his back on modernist cuisine and returned to his more traditional roots. Located in one of Barcelona’s best-preserved medieval palaces, Restaurante A’s menu is dedicated to large, family-style dishes like Moorish chicken, shrimp carpaccio, and parmentier ravioli with wild mushrooms, truffles, and jamon Iberico. The environment is casual with prices to match, but the food is no less ambitious. For dessert, try the traditional torrijas — like a Spanish french toast — with smoked milk ice cream.

A dish at Restaurante A
Photo: Restaurante A Official Website

Fismuler

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When people behind Fismuler in Madrid opened a branch of their popular restaurant in Barcelona, it became an instant hit. The key to its success? A menu that balances modernist dishes with simpler ones, and an emphasis on quality throughout. The three chefs behind Fismuler shared a kitchen at El Bulli 15 years ago, which explains their more technique-driven dishes, like gilthead carpaccio with almonds and razor clams with kimchi and fried kale. On Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, live music keeps diners in their seats long after the last course is served.

Rice with Clams and Artichokes at Fismuler
Photo: Fismuler/Facebook

L’Artesana Poblenou

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The humble appearance of L’Artesana belies the talented crew gathered inside. Romina Reyes, Héctor Barbero, and Pau Pons all come here by way of other great Barcelona restaurants, and at this casual spot — their first project together — they show off their collective kitchen talents. See them on display in dishes like the marinated mackerel; the fried egg with potato, cod, and egg yolk “Rösti”; and the superbly curated natural-wine list.

L’Artesana Poblenou
Photo: L’Artesana Poblenou/Facebook

SOFIA Be So Gastronomic Restaurant

Chef Carles Tejedor (El Nacional, the Academy, and others) is behind the timeless Be So, which specializes in haute versions of hotel-dining-room classics like steak tartare and oysters. The restaurant’s wine presentation is unique: Pick a favorite scent from one of seven small perfume bottles, and the sommelier will recommend a handful different wines to match. Be So shares the Hotel Sofia with three other worthy newcomers, including the Mediterranean restaurant Impar, the library-themed book cafe PhiloSofia, and the Zuu dinner theater.

Cherry gazpacho with king crab at Be So
Photo: Be So/Facebook

Cocina Hermanos Torres

Located in a nearly 9,000-square-foot industrial warehouse, this mammoth restaurant is the personal passion project of celebrity-chef brothers Sergio and Javier Torres. Both chefs recently received their second Michelin star for Dos Cielos, and now they’ve bet big on a restaurant that impresses both architecturally and culinarily. Here the Torres brothers pay playful tribute to the recipes of their mother and grandmother, with surprising dishes like sunflower-seed ice cream and a a faux “rice” with vegetables.

Cocina Hermanos Torres
Photo: Cocina Hermanos Torres/Facebook

El Cinco

Located in a former nightclub venue, El Cinco is chef Josep Armenteros’s Barcelona debut. The menu draws on the chef’s devotion to seasonality as well as his experience working with Michelin-starred chef Carles Gaig. Don’t miss the boneless duck with pears and millet, the partridge with cabbage, and the menorquin de ensaimada (a typical brioche from Balear Islands) with sobrassada (Majorcan sausage) and cheese. The menu is heavy on vegetables, and don’t sleep on dessert. Stick around after dinner — the nightclub El 5 is just downstairs in the basement.

Fish at El Cinco
Photo: El Cinco Facebook

RICE! by Sanchez Romera

Sánchez Romera left his career as a neurologist to follow his dream of becoming a chef. His unconventional path, which included a stint at New York’s Dream Hotel, led him to open Rice!, a colorful restaurant based around the staple grain. Multi-textured rice varieties are the star of unique dishes like black rice with curry prawns, cuttlefish, and kombu velouté, and the Barcelona rollsix maki rolls made with different rices and filled with an array of vegetables and seafood.

Rice! by Sanchez Romera
Photo: Rice by Sánchez Romera/Facebook

Plata Bistro

The chefs at Plata Bistro strive to keep the dishes simple. Very simple. Each traditional stew has only three ingredients, but through clever techniques and seasonal ingredients, the minimalist dishes have mass appeal. The menu, which changes continually, is projected on the dining room wall with slides showcasing the day’s options, made with ingredients sourced from the local farmers market. Think chanterelles with a fried egg, chicken with Swiss chard and foie gras, or fresh strawberries with mascarpone and balsamic.

Salad at Plata Bistro
Photo: Plata Bistro/Facebook

Yakumanka

Chef-owner Gastón Acurio is Peru’s most famous culinary ambassador, and arguably the driving force behind the world’s sudden obsession with Peruvian ceviche. Yakumanka is inspired by Acurio’s internationally successful La Mar concept, and the menu here features some of that restaurant’s best ceviches, including Carretillero made with mussels, shrimp, crab, and tiger milk (a citrus-based marinade) and apaltado with avocado and grilled octopus.

Ceviche at Yakumanka
Photo: Yankumanka/Facebook

Pur Restaurant

Michelin-starred chef Nandu Jubany is behind Pur (Catalan for “pure”), where little distracts from the integrity of the ingredients. The kitchen sits on display in the center of the restaurant, so diners can watch as chefs prepare dishes like bone marrow with caviar, escala anchovies atop stracciatella, and salt-cured tuna belly with toasted almond ajoblanco. Head downstairs for a nightcap at the cheekily named basement cocktail bar, Impur.  

Pur Barcelona
Photo: Pur Barcelona/Facebook

Restaurante Xavier Pellicer

According to acclaimed chef Xavier Pellicer, all ingredients possess an energy that gets passed directly from purveyor to cook to diner. This is what he aims to capture on the plate at his latest eponymous restaurant. With a staunch emphasis on biodynamic and organic practices, this flexitarian restaurant reveres vegetables without snubbing the occasional bit of fish or meat. Pellicer has revived some of the classic dishes that made him famous, like a beetroot gazpacho and pink lentil hummus, but you’ll also find new hits, like a roasted pumpkin with chutney and burrata with asparagus and citrus.

Restaurane Xavier Pellicer
Photo: Xavier Pellicer/Facebook

Al Kostat

Located in the basement of the Moritz brewery and sharing a space with the Michelin-starred restaurant Alkimia, Al Kostat (which means “next door” in Catalan) is the playground of chef Jordi Vilà, who cooks up a large menu of approachable, affordable dishes. A handful of tables make up the dining room, where diners enjoy everything from simple meat croquettes to little luxuries like shrimp heads with caviar.

The dining room Al Kostat
Photo: Al Kostat/Facebook

My Fucking Restaurant

There’s more to this enterprise than its unsubtle name. Two Italian slow-food devotees are behind the well-designed spot, complete with a dining room-adjacent courtyard for growing fresh herbs. The food mixes the chefs’ Italian heritage with more modernist sensibilities. Try the Parmesan crispy taco and the restaurant’s signature version of the classic patatas bravas, here called “Bravas que querían ser patatas” (bravas that dreamed of becoming chips). They are indeed a dream.

Restaurante A

In a city whose restaurant scene has been long ruled by the avant-garde, chef Alain Guiard has turned his back on modernist cuisine and returned to his more traditional roots. Located in one of Barcelona’s best-preserved medieval palaces, Restaurante A’s menu is dedicated to large, family-style dishes like Moorish chicken, shrimp carpaccio, and parmentier ravioli with wild mushrooms, truffles, and jamon Iberico. The environment is casual with prices to match, but the food is no less ambitious. For dessert, try the traditional torrijas — like a Spanish french toast — with smoked milk ice cream.

A dish at Restaurante A
Photo: Restaurante A Official Website

Fismuler

When people behind Fismuler in Madrid opened a branch of their popular restaurant in Barcelona, it became an instant hit. The key to its success? A menu that balances modernist dishes with simpler ones, and an emphasis on quality throughout. The three chefs behind Fismuler shared a kitchen at El Bulli 15 years ago, which explains their more technique-driven dishes, like gilthead carpaccio with almonds and razor clams with kimchi and fried kale. On Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, live music keeps diners in their seats long after the last course is served.

Rice with Clams and Artichokes at Fismuler
Photo: Fismuler/Facebook

L’Artesana Poblenou

The humble appearance of L’Artesana belies the talented crew gathered inside. Romina Reyes, Héctor Barbero, and Pau Pons all come here by way of other great Barcelona restaurants, and at this casual spot — their first project together — they show off their collective kitchen talents. See them on display in dishes like the marinated mackerel; the fried egg with potato, cod, and egg yolk “Rösti”; and the superbly curated natural-wine list.

L’Artesana Poblenou
Photo: L’Artesana Poblenou/Facebook

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