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Bridge across the Naviglio Grande canal in Milan
Photo: Ventdusud / Shutterstock

The 38 Essential Milan Restaurants

Where to find classic risotto, perfect pastries, and Michelin-starred haute cuisine in Italy’s fashion capital

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Bridge across the Naviglio Grande canal in Milan
| Photo: Ventdusud / Shutterstock

Milan has long had a reputation for being home to workaholics, too busy to fully enjoy the art of cooking, writer Angelica Frey says of her hometown. Here, quick panini and aperitivo (the pre-dinner drinks and small bites combo) reign supreme: They are as much a part of Milan’s cultural history as landmarks like the Duomo, the San Siro Stadium, and Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Last Supper” fresco. In keeping with its business-minded ethos, Milan seldom shows its prettier side, so, just as you are likely to spot a dreamy verdant courtyard behind a heavy doorway, you can find warm, hearty eateries on gray, anonymous streets.

Like much of Italy, Milanese restaurants favor local ingredients, but Milan’s culinary landscape has slowly begun to change as a new generation puts a creative spin on cuisine that’s steeped in tradition. Although international restaurants are still few, thanks to the 2015 food-themed World’s Fair, hosted by Milan, the restaurant scene in Italy’s fashion capital is gradually shedding its classic veneer.

Without further ado, the 38 essential eating and drinking spots of Milan, Italy.

Editor’s Note: Eater is not updating international maps at this time given disruptions to global travel during the COVID-19 crisis.

Prices per person, excluding alcohol

$ = Less than €15 (less than USD 16)
$$ = €16 - €39 (USD 18 to USD 44)
$$$ = €40 - €66 (USD 45 to USD 73)
$$$$ = More than €66 (more than USD 74)

For more on what to see and do in Milan besides eat, check out this design-lover’s guide from our friends at Curbed.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Latteria Maffucci

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Via Privata Angiolo Maffucci, 24
20159 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 375 614

If you manage to snag one of the 15 seats at this off-the-beaten-path trattoria that has no written menu, Sardinian owner Silvio will treat you to seafood-based dishes with interesting flavor combinations, like arugula topped with squid and strawberries or pomegranate and octopus salad. The tasting menu, which comprises a selection of eight starters, one first course, one second course, dessert, plus coffee and a glass of mirto (a blueberry bitter), is only 50 euros, though most diners will be too stuffed to make it to the second course. [$-$$]

2. Trattoria Mirta

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Piazza S. Materno, 12
20131 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 9118 0496
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Gambero Rosso, the Italian authority in food publishing, praised Trattoria Mirta for offering a “reassuring experience,” but it’s by no means a run-of-the-mill Italian restaurant. Uruguayan chef Juan Lema, who named the restaurant after his mother, puts his own spin on traditional dishes, such as Parmigiano encased in phyllo dough and brasato (braised beef) cooked in chocolate and blueberries. His desserts are equally creative, and the goat cheese-based creme caramel with tart cherries is a must order. [$$]

A dish at Trattoria Mirta
Photo: Official Website

3. Berberé

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Via Sebenico, 21
20124 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 3670 7820
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With no-frills, highly digestible pizza that prizes quality of ingredients over labels like “bio” (the EU-version of organic), Berberé is known for letting guests choose from three different doughs: classic, sourdough, or hydrolysis-based dough, which is yeast-free but bread-like nonetheless. The topping combinations are demure and elegant: Fried eggplant goes with smoked ricotta, basil, and tomato; coppa with stracciatella, fior di latte cheese, and orange-infused oil. The pies skew on the smaller side, so it’s best to order one and a half pies per person. [$-$$]

Pizza at Berberé
Photo: Official Site

4. Ratanà

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Via Gaetano de Castillia, 28
20124 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 8712 8855
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The owners, including actor Antonio Albanese, opened Ratanà in a fin-de-siecle villa located in the middle of a once run-down neighborhood. Chef Cesare Battisti offers a creative spin on local cuisine, with a menu that changes seasonally: think traditional northern Italian risotto, squash blossoms with basil pesto, and game hen accompanied by lemon-glazed scallions for summer. That said, if you are looking for pure Milanese fare, it has that too: The saffron-infused risotto and ossobuco is available year round. Don’t forget to ask for mondeghili (Milanese meatballs) as an appetizer. [$$$]

Risotto at Ratanà
Photo: Ratanà / Instagram

5. Il Massimo del Gelato

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Via Lodovico Castelvetro, 18
20154 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 349 4943
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Thanks to 10 varieties of chocolate that are as decadent as a ganache, non-sugary fruit options, and owner Massimo Travani’s painstaking obsession with fresh ingredients, Il Massimo del Gelato turns even a 2.50 euro gelato cone into a five-star dessert experience. His fixation on good ingredients can come at a cost: His pistachio flavor, which uses the prized Bronte pistachios and is almost salty, was discontinued for a whole season when the pistachio crop did not meet Massimo’s standards. For the lactose-averse, Travani makes a selection of granita during the warmer months that are almost as creamy and rich as regular gelato. [$]

Gelato at Il Massimo del Gelato
Photo: Official Website

6. Ristorante Ribot

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Via Marco Cremosano, 41
20148 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 3300 1646
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Located in close proximity to both the soccer stadium and the horse racetracks, Ribot is an equestrian-themed restaurant located in a fin-de-siecle villa. The name Ribot itself comes from a champion horse, but the hues of the many horse racing-themed artworks and memorabilia are muted enough that they don’t make the overall decor look tacky. Don't overdo it with the antipasti board, and be sure to save some room for the dishes coming from the grill, especially the steak fiorentina. Dinner grants you complimentary chocolate fondue with assorted fresh fruit. [$$$]

Ristorante Ribot
Photo: Official Website

7. Pescaria

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Via Nino Bonnet, 5
20154 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 659 9322
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Originally a beachfront restaurant in Apulia, a region in Southern Italy, Pescaria’s second location in Milan brought the city a rich selection of fish and seafood panini. Those who can tolerate the long lines at peak hours and the fast-food-style ordering protocol will be rewarded with buns filled with delicacies like octopus with sauteed chicory and anchovy sauce, or shrimp with pancetta, potato crisps, and burrata stracciatella. [$-$$]

A shrimp and squash panino at Pescaria
Photo: Pescaria / Facebook

8. Michetta's Panini Milano

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Via Ambrogio Campiglio, 13
20133 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 4547 8564
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At this eatery, all panini are prepared with the michetta, the ultimate Milanese bread roll that looks like a tortoiseshell and is crunchy on the outside and extremely soft on the inside. Michetta (the eatery) has more than 40 options. Mini slider versions allow diners to try more than one, and ingredient combinations like cotechino (a coarse sausage), sauerkraut, and mustard nod to the years Milan spent under Austrian rule. [$]

Panino at Michetta
Photo: Michetta’s Panini / Facebook

9. Cantine Isola

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Via Paolo Sarpi, 30
20154 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 331 5249
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This 120-year-old wine shop is located on Chinatown’s main thoroughfare. Although Cantine Isola sells more than 5,000 wines by the bottle, it’s best to stop in and savor the by-the-glass selection, which comes with crostini, charcuterie, and cheese boards. The pairings are themed: For example, when the national soccer team is playing, Cantine Isola serves the best sparkling wines from all over the country for the ultimate soccer-like “formation.” Tuesdays are poetry nights. [$]

A selection of wine at Cantine Isola
Photo: Le Cantine Isola / Facebook

10. Ravioleria Sarpi

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Via Paolo Sarpi, 27
20154 Milano MI, Italy
+39 331 887 0596
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Third-generation butcher Walter Sirtori and textile entrepreneur Hujian “Agie” Zhou joined forces to open this Ravioleria (literally a “dumpling shop”) right next to Sartori’s butcher shop. All of the Chinese dumplings are prepared on the premises, and come filled with whatever cuts of meat (beef or pork) Sirtori’s supplier has handy. Vegetarian options are available, too. [$]

Dumplings at Ravioleria Sarpi
Photo: Ravioleria Sarpi / Facebook

11. Ciripizza

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Via Canonica, 81
20154 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 3656 1221

On the border of Chinatown, Ciripizza offers the thinner, crunchier Salerno variety of pizza inside a dining room that blends spartan and kitsch decor. Even the “healthier” options — diced cherry tomatoes, bufala mozzarella, and Parmesan on a whole-wheat pie — feel indulgent here and worth the long lines and an almost unbearable noise level. Ciripizza also offers a quarter roast chicken straight from the wood-fired pizza oven, a welcome addition to the menu. [$]

Pizza at Ciripizza
Photo: Ciripizza / Facebook

12. Pavè

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Via Felice Casati, 27
20124 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 9439 2259
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In Italy, breakfast consists of coffee and a pastry consumed at the counter of your neighborhood cafe. Pavè, founded in 2012 by three under-30 entrepreneurs (still a rarity in Italian businesses), harnessed this approach to create a bakery-laboratory that serves state-of-the-art breakfast pastries, like brioche buns with ginger and hazelnut spread, or “braided” croissants laced with coffee. When lunch hour rolls around, it offers shifts to quick croissant-based sandwiches and healthy soups. After work hours, Pavè hosts a throwback aperitivo, inspired by the 1980s Milanese lifestyle: Classics such as Negronis, Pimm’s cups, and bicicletta pair with charcuterie and cheese boards and freshly made pizza and focaccia slices. [$]

Pastries at Pavè
Photo: Pavè / Facebook

13. Dry

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Via Solferino, 33
20121 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 6379 3414
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By naming the place Dry, chef Andrea Berton (who also owns the nearby Pisacco and his high-end namesake restaurant Berton) wanted to reference both Prohibition-era policies regarding alcohol and emphasize his minimalist approach to ingredients. The result is an interesting blend of a pizzeria and a cocktail bar. The combination works, and there’s something inherently decadent about eating one of Berton’s comfort food pizzas, such as the Ventricina (spicy sausage, shallots, fior di latte cheese), alongside carefully prepared cocktails like the Feels Like Home (Hendrick’s gin, bergamot rosolio, Americano Cocchi, cucumber-ginger-green-apple syrup, lime, and lemon). [$$]

Ventricina pizza at Dry
Photo: Dry / Instagram

14. Sumire

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Via Varese, 1
20121 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 9147 1595
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Over the last 20 years, Milan has seen a deluge of sushi restaurants of varying degrees of quality, but Sumire is one of the few spots whose offerings go beyond basic sushi and sashimi combos. The menu here is steeped in Osaka tradition: the highlight is kushikatsu, skewers made from vegetables, like lotus roots and yams, and meats, including shrimp and pork loin. The two levels of this cozy eatery fill up fast, so be sure to make a reservation for lunch or dinner. [$$-$$$]

Katsu at Sumire
Photo: Official Website

15. Yoshinobu

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Via Giuseppe Parini, 7
20121 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 3659 1742
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This high-end restaurant has a well-rounded Japanese-food menu, but is primarily known for its sushi and sashimi selection, which is best appreciated at the counter. There, chef Yoshinobu Kurio is happy to offer off-the-menu suggestions for his nigiri or his maki, such as langoustine-tempura, or a temaki made with raw red shrimp and avocado. Yoshinobu’s fish-to-rice ratio in the nigiri deserves an honorable mention, too: the fish fillets always completely cloak the rice base. [$$$]

Bento set at Yoshinobu
Photo: Official Website

16. Joia

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Via Panfilo Castaldi, 18
20124 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 204 9244
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Swiss-born Pietro Leemann opened this haute-vegetarian restaurant in 1989, a time when vegetarian cuisine was still perceived as tasteless food for post-hippie folks. His approach is rooted in the practice of imitating the consistencies of fish and meat with vegetables, apparent in dishes like an “olive filet” and a “wellness carpaccio” made from thin watermelon slices dressed with balsamic vinegar, cocoa butter, and thyme. In 1996, Joia became the first vegetarian restaurant with a Michelin star in Europe, and, 20 years later, the restaurant still has it. [$$$-$$$$]

Eggplant at Joia
Photo: Joia / Facebook

17. Bar Basso

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Via Plinio, 39
20020 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 2940 0580
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Those enthralled by the philosophy behind aperitivo can thank Bar Basso, the institution responsible for expanding quality pre-dinner cocktails beyond the walls of sophisticated international hotels. Mirko Stocchetto, a barman who had worked at Harry's Bar in Venice, took over the space, at that time a neighborhood haunt, in 1967. A year later, while preparing a Negroni, he accidentally swapped gin with prosecco, and that slip resulted in the creation of Negroni Sbagliato (literally "wrong"), which soon became a symbol of Milanese hedonism. To this day, Bar Basso is popular with an art and fashion crowd (especially during fashion week and design week) as well as with local retirees enjoying a pre-dinner drink. [$]

A cocktail at Bar Basso
Photo: Bar Basso / Facebook

18. Pacifico

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Via della Moscova, 29
20121 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 8724 4737
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Pacifico is Milan’s first high-end Peruvian restaurant, and the setting boasts dimly lit, Art-Deco-meets-’80s decor. The fish-centric menu encompasses both traditional dishes (ceviche con leche de tigre, with a spicy kick thanks to aji rocoto) and forays into fusion Nikkei — and pop-culture territory: the ceviche Bond is served in a martini glass and the fish accented with habanero, basil, and fish roe. While ceviche is the main attraction, round out your selections with some tiraditos (skewers) and, curiously, dim sum. [$$$]

Ceviche at Pacifico
Photo: Official Website

19. Latteria San Marco

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Via S. Marco, 24
20121 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 659 7653

Eight tables, no reservations, a vegetable-focused menu that changes daily, and kitschy decor are the main draws of this hole-in-the-wall Brera neighborhood mainstay. If you’re lucky enough to find a seat, hope the crudaiola, a cold vegetable soup, is on the menu. Otherwise, you can’t go wrong with the primi courses, like testaroli (triangular-shaped pasta) with zucchini, eggplant, and salted ricotta. Chef Arturo Maggi, who has owned the place since 1965, claims to cook a good portion of his dishes in a silver pan — allegedly, it makes them particularly digestible. [$$]

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20. Lùbar

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Via Palestro, 16
20121 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 8352 7769
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The children of whimsical designer Luisa Beccaria started Lùbar as a simple food cart. This newest location (the original is on the mezzanine floor of Milan’s Central Station) occupies the portico area of Villa Reale overlooking Milan’s public gardens, where it serves as the cafe of Milan’s GAM (Modern Art Gallery). The fin-de-siecle decor, reminiscent of a winter garden, pairs well with the neoclassical structure of the villa. Dishes served in Sicilian ceramic bowls — like chickpea-flour flatbread paired with avocado, downsized arancine, and pistachio-speckled shrimp — blend Sicilian tradition with millennial-friendly trends. The dessert selection is more traditional. Get the cannoli, which are filled on premises. [$-$$]

Cannoli at Lùbar
Photo: Lùbar / Facebook

21. Di Viole Di Liquirizia

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Via Madonnina, 10
20121 Milano MI, Italy

A selection of pastries, such as scones, macarons, and cupcakes, along with a shabby-chic decor reminiscent of Alice in Wonderland make Di Viole di Liquirizia one of the most Instagram-friendly spots in Milan. This, however, does not translate to an underwhelming menu. If you are trend averse, and think that cupcakes should remain a Sex and the City memento, just steer yourself toward the apple crumble. [$]

Cupcakes at Di Viole Di Liquirizia
Photo: Di Viole Di Liquirizia / Facebook

22. Nottingham Forest

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Viale Piave, 1
20129 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 798 312
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Don't let the tacky decor, a blend of tropical and tiki elements, deter you: This cocktail bar tinkers with molecules, nitrogen, and more to create unusual cocktail combinations. For the Feng Shui Stone, for example, bartenders marinate pebbles in alcohol and natural flavors and then deposit them at the bottom of the glass. “The Revenant” counts insect eggs and oak sap among its ingredients. Just don't call the people behind the bar “mixologists”: they are “bar chefs,” and their black uniforms prove it. [$-$$]

Nottingham Forest
Photo: Official Website

23. Filippo La Mantia

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Piazza Risorgimento, 2/a
20129 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 7000 5309
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What’s Italian cuisine without onions or garlic? That's the question chef Filippo La Mantia, who has trouble digesting onions and garlic, set out to answer in his eponymous restaurant, where he acts as both chef and host. As it turns out, garlic and onions are not always a necessity: La Mantia’s personal take on eggplant caponata, for example, includes cinnamon, and his spaghetti with raw shrimp is flavored with a thick lemon sauce, basil, and toasted almonds. A selection of four frittate (omelets) are always on the dinner menu; share the one with pasta, breadcrumbs, horseradish, chicory, and potatoes. [$$$]

A dish at Filippo La Mantia
Photo: Filippo La Mantia / Facebook

24. Pasticceria Sissi

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Piazza Risorgimento, 6
20129 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 7601 4664

Owned by husband-and-wife duo Sissi and Zig Faye, Sissi is an old-school Milanese bakery with (pre-) millennial-pink walls that offers a well-balanced selection of sweet and savory pastries. The staff fills croissants with custard right on site. If the weather allows, enjoy the sweet snack in the backyard. That said, Sissi is at its best during Mardi Gras, when the Fayes make holiday-specific treats like chiacchiere, which consist of crunchy squares of fried dough doused in powdered sugar. [$]

A pastry at Sissi
Photo: Sissi / Facebook

25. Il Giardino dei Segreti

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Via Pasquale Sottocorno, 17
20129 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 7600 8376
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Those curious about Sardinian cuisine, which is quintessentially Mediterranean but with more meat, should head to Il Giardino dei Segreti. Book a table in the garden if planning ahead, but if you can’t, ordering the fritto misto should be enough to put your mind off the fact that you’re missing out on patio seating complete with a native, ingrown tree. [$$$]

The patio at Il Giardino dei Segreti
Photo: Il Giardino Dei Segreti / Facebook

26. De Santis Panini Milano

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Corso Magenta, 9
20123 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 7209 5124
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When it opened in 1982, De Santis introduced a panino that offered more than a way to fill an empty stomach. With over 200 options organized by protein (bresaola, Prague ham, salami, etc.) and combinations like the Alex (prosciutto, mozzarella, truffle oil, pepper) and the Portoghese (bresaola, sliced orange, cocktail sauce, and fontina cheese), it can be daunting to make up one’s mind. Yet prices ranging from 6 euros to 10 euros and sizes that tend to run small mean you don’t have to limit yourself to just one. [$]

A panino at De Santis
Photo: Official Website

27. Saigon

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Via Archimede, 53
20129 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 7010 1966
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Italy’s premier newspaper Corriere della Sera declared Saigon “the first colonial-style Vietnamese restaurant” in Milan when it opened in 2017. The menu features an eclectic mix of high-end Vietnamese mainstays alongside the now-customary fusion dishes, like a “bouillabaisse Indochine,” pho featuring Wagyu-beef carpaccio, and a Vietnamese ceviche with mango, papaya, lime, and a mirin marinade. [$$$]

Saigon
Photo: Saigon / Instagram

28. Manuelina

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Via Santa Radegonda, 10
20121 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 885 2297
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Manuelina is the birthplace of the Recco style of focaccia, which consists of two thin sheets of dough filled with crescenza cheese. Originally a trattoria located in the seaside town of Recco, Manuelina counted the likes of Nobel laureate poet Eugenio Montale, Albert Einstein, and the Italian poet Gabriele D’Annunzio among its customers. Today, visitors to Milan’s city center can enjoy a slice, or more, of Manuelina’s famous focaccia. The plain Recco variety is the best-seller, but you can’t go wrong with the Pizzata (Recco focaccia with tomatoes, capers, olives, and anchovies) or a savory pie, such as the Pasqualina, filled with spinach, ricotta and herbs. [$]

Recco focaccia at Manuelina
Photo: Manuelina / Facebook

29. Langosteria

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Via Savona, 10
20144 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 5811 1649
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As the name Langosteria suggests, the restaurant is a temple to seafood, crustaceans in particular. Since the first location opened in 2007, followed by a bistro nearby in 2012 and a cafe in the city center in 2016, Langosteria has established itself as a stronghold of the Milanese seafood scene, and rightfully so. With raw-fish platters (make sure you choose the one with shrimp from Mazara del Vallo), seafood-topped pastas, and Catalan-style main courses, Langosteria manages to deliver an upscale experience without the too-cold formality usually associated with high-end seafood restaurants. [$$$]

Seafood pasta at Langosteria
Photo: Langosteria / Facebook

30. Lambiczoon

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Via Friuli, 46
20135 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 3653 4840
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On a seemingly quiet residential block, gastropub Lambiczoon proudly showcases the best brews and breweries of Northern Italy, such as Ghisa, a stout from Birrificio Lambrate, or Lop 60, an IPA from Birrificio Dada, along with a selection of international drafts. The menu largely consists of burgers made with prime Piedmont beef. The “Testa Quedra,” for example, which means “square” (as in, an uptight person), has pancetta, fontina cheese, Parmesan-infused mayo, and a balsamic-vinegar reduction. Instead of the regular fries, order “pork fries,” made of breaded and fried coppa. In keeping with the beer-centric nature of the place, the house dessert, birramisu, is a hoppy version of the standard tiramisu. [$-$$]

A sandwich at Lambiczoon
Photo: Lambiczoon / Facebook

31. Trattoria Trippa

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Via Giorgio Vasari, 3
20135 Milano MI, Italy
+39 327 668 7908
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Trippa means tripe, and this entrail-based dish is often featured on the menu here. Chef Diego Rossi trained with famous Dolomites-based chef Norbert Niederkofler. The menu changes according to availability, but, as a general rule, the chef repurposes “peasant” cuisine: A risotto comes topped with silene, an herb known for its sweet and mild flavor; a soup will contain nettle and cicerchia (a local legume that used to be a pantry staple but then fell out of favor). Simplicity is key: Chef Rossi never uses more than four ingredients for a dish. [$$]

Pappa al Pomodoro at Trippa
Photo: Trattoria Trippa / Instagram

32. MAM

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Via Lodovico Muratori, 7
20135 Milano MI, Italy

MAM is short for Milano Amore Mio, which means “Milan loves me.” This cutesy bistro, complete with a retro soundtrack, offers vegetarian prix fixe trays that showcase just how satisfying the right combination of starch, vegetables, and cheese can be. Go for dishes like creamy borscht made of beets, carrots, and greek yogurt; poached eggs on a bed of saffron cream; and a pumpkin flan with gorgonzola cheese. Non-vegetarians won’t even notice the absence of meat. [$-$$]

A meal at MAM
Photo by Angelica Frey

33. Un Posto a Milano at Cascina Cuccagna

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Via Cuccagna, angolo via Muratori, 2/4
20135 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 8342 1007
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A cascina is a square-yarded rural building typical of Northern Italy, and this 18th-century cascina now houses a restaurant offering no-frills but high-quality dishes from chef Nicola Cavallaro. Pasta is made on premises, and is paired with bufala cream and confit green tomatoes, while a Fassona-beef bavette steak comes garnished with a sauce of plums, peaches, and cilantro. Interestingly, the menu also includes options for babies, including items like the smoothest polenta combined with 24-month shaved Parmesan. If you’re in a hurry, order from the to-go menu of sandwiches and street food at the bar counter. [$$]

Eggplant melanzane at Un Posto a Milano
Photo: Un Posto a Milano / Instagram

34. Rita

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Via Angelo Fumagalli, 1
20143 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 837 2865
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People have been flocking to Rita for craft cocktails since 2002, way before mixology was common parlance in urban areas. In an era when most of the Milanese bars are trying to cash in on lackluster happy hour deals, Rita concocts creative drinks such as the Saffron Bastard (a vodka-sour variation enriched by a cardamom tincture and saffron-based sugar) and their signature cocktail, Cazzi Tuoi (it means “your f—ing business”), with vodka, lemon juice, lychee liqueur, and a dash of cranberry-vanilla liqueur. The complimentary small bites (common currency in Italian bars) include a selection of healthyish tartines and crudites. [$$]

Cocktails at Rita
Photo by Angelica Frey

35. Al Cortile

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Via Giovenale, 7
20136 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 8909 3079
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Al Cortile (which means “In the courtyard”) shares its space with other venues, including a cooking academy and a craft cocktail bar (Fonderie Milanesi). The eponymous courtyard is decked out with jasmine blooms in the summer, and the interior dining room is a loft-like space with a post-World War II aesthetic, a period rife with innovation. The restaurant’s menu is managed by the staff at the cooking academy, and, amid Italian specialties, you can spot soba with dashi and beef tataki. [$$]

Octopus at Al Cortile
Photo: Al Cortile / Facebook

36. Bar Luce

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Largo Isarco, 2
20139 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 5666 2611
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Inside the Fondazione Prada, a contemporary art museum, is a bar designed by film director Wes Anderson, whose aesthetic is immediately recognizable in the trompe-l’oeil wall decorations and his themed pinball machines. It's the ideal place for a quick lunch or a snack (they have a robust selection of panini and tartines) and the cocktail list includes all the all-time classics. [$]

Bar Luce
Photo: Fondazione Prada / Facebook

37. Mangiari di Strada

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20147 Milan
Metropolitan City of Milan, Italy
+39 02 415 0556
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If you can get past the fact that, in order to savor real Italian street food, you have to commit to eating entrails, then trek to Mangiari di Strada on the western periphery of Milan to try sandwiches filled with tongue, spleen, tripe, lampredotto (the cow’s fourth stomach), chopped heart, and fried brains. Squeamish folks can stick to solid vegetarian options, like a fried mozzarella sandwich, focaccia with burrata and fresh pesto, or chickpea-flour flatbread. [$-$$]

A plate of organ meat at Mangiari di Strada
Photo: Mangiari di Strada / Facebook

38. Erba Brusca

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Alzaia Naviglio Pavese, 286
20142 Milano MI, Italy
+39 02 8738 0711
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Located alongside the Naviglio Pavese (one of Milan's canals) where the city begins to blend with smaller towns, Erba Brusca has an on-site vegetable garden and an overall radical-chic vibe. The menu is quite short (three starters, three first courses, three second courses) with French, Italian, and Middle Eastern influences: think eggplant with baba ghanoush and burrata, or gnocchi with sauteed chickpeas, pecorino, lemon, and mint. [$$]

Erba Brusca
Photo: Erba Brusca / Facebook

1. Latteria Maffucci

Via Privata Angiolo Maffucci, 24, 20159 Milano MI, Italy

If you manage to snag one of the 15 seats at this off-the-beaten-path trattoria that has no written menu, Sardinian owner Silvio will treat you to seafood-based dishes with interesting flavor combinations, like arugula topped with squid and strawberries or pomegranate and octopus salad. The tasting menu, which comprises a selection of eight starters, one first course, one second course, dessert, plus coffee and a glass of mirto (a blueberry bitter), is only 50 euros, though most diners will be too stuffed to make it to the second course. [$-$$]

Via Privata Angiolo Maffucci, 24
20159 Milano MI, Italy

2. Trattoria Mirta

Piazza S. Materno, 12, 20131 Milano MI, Italy
A dish at Trattoria Mirta
Photo: Official Website

Gambero Rosso, the Italian authority in food publishing, praised Trattoria Mirta for offering a “reassuring experience,” but it’s by no means a run-of-the-mill Italian restaurant. Uruguayan chef Juan Lema, who named the restaurant after his mother, puts his own spin on traditional dishes, such as Parmigiano encased in phyllo dough and brasato (braised beef) cooked in chocolate and blueberries. His desserts are equally creative, and the goat cheese-based creme caramel with tart cherries is a must order. [$$]

Piazza S. Materno, 12
20131 Milano MI, Italy

3. Berberé

Via Sebenico, 21, 20124 Milano MI, Italy
Pizza at Berberé
Photo: Official Site

With no-frills, highly digestible pizza that prizes quality of ingredients over labels like “bio” (the EU-version of organic), Berberé is known for letting guests choose from three different doughs: classic, sourdough, or hydrolysis-based dough, which is yeast-free but bread-like nonetheless. The topping combinations are demure and elegant: Fried eggplant goes with smoked ricotta, basil, and tomato; coppa with stracciatella, fior di latte cheese, and orange-infused oil. The pies skew on the smaller side, so it’s best to order one and a half pies per person. [$-$$]

Via Sebenico, 21
20124 Milano MI, Italy

4. Ratanà

Via Gaetano de Castillia, 28, 20124 Milano MI, Italy
Risotto at Ratanà
Photo: Ratanà / Instagram

The owners, including actor Antonio Albanese, opened Ratanà in a fin-de-siecle villa located in the middle of a once run-down neighborhood. Chef Cesare Battisti offers a creative spin on local cuisine, with a menu that changes seasonally: think traditional northern Italian risotto, squash blossoms with basil pesto, and game hen accompanied by lemon-glazed scallions for summer. That said, if you are looking for pure Milanese fare, it has that too: The saffron-infused risotto and ossobuco is available year round. Don’t forget to ask for mondeghili (Milanese meatballs) as an appetizer. [$$$]

Via Gaetano de Castillia, 28
20124 Milano MI, Italy

5. Il Massimo del Gelato

Via Lodovico Castelvetro, 18, 20154 Milano MI, Italy
Gelato at Il Massimo del Gelato
Photo: Official Website

Thanks to 10 varieties of chocolate that are as decadent as a ganache, non-sugary fruit options, and owner Massimo Travani’s painstaking obsession with fresh ingredients, Il Massimo del Gelato turns even a 2.50 euro gelato cone into a five-star dessert experience. His fixation on good ingredients can come at a cost: His pistachio flavor, which uses the prized Bronte pistachios and is almost salty, was discontinued for a whole season when the pistachio crop did not meet Massimo’s standards. For the lactose-averse, Travani makes a selection of granita during the warmer months that are almost as creamy and rich as regular gelato. [$]

Via Lodovico Castelvetro, 18
20154 Milano MI, Italy

6. Ristorante Ribot

Via Marco Cremosano, 41, 20148 Milano MI, Italy
Ristorante Ribot
Photo: Official Website

Located in close proximity to both the soccer stadium and the horse racetracks, Ribot is an equestrian-themed restaurant located in a fin-de-siecle villa. The name Ribot itself comes from a champion horse, but the hues of the many horse racing-themed artworks and memorabilia are muted enough that they don’t make the overall decor look tacky. Don't overdo it with the antipasti board, and be sure to save some room for the dishes coming from the grill, especially the steak fiorentina. Dinner grants you complimentary chocolate fondue with assorted fresh fruit. [$$$]

Via Marco Cremosano, 41
20148 Milano MI, Italy

7. Pescaria

Via Nino Bonnet, 5, 20154 Milano MI, Italy
A shrimp and squash panino at Pescaria
Photo: Pescaria / Facebook

Originally a beachfront restaurant in Apulia, a region in Southern Italy, Pescaria’s second location in Milan brought the city a rich selection of fish and seafood panini. Those who can tolerate the long lines at peak hours and the fast-food-style ordering protocol will be rewarded with buns filled with delicacies like octopus with sauteed chicory and anchovy sauce, or shrimp with pancetta, potato crisps, and burrata stracciatella. [$-$$]

Via Nino Bonnet, 5
20154 Milano MI, Italy

8. Michetta's Panini Milano

Via Ambrogio Campiglio, 13, 20133 Milano MI, Italy
Panino at Michetta
Photo: Michetta’s Panini / Facebook

At this eatery, all panini are prepared with the michetta, the ultimate Milanese bread roll that looks like a tortoiseshell and is crunchy on the outside and extremely soft on the inside. Michetta (the eatery) has more than 40 options. Mini slider versions allow diners to try more than one, and ingredient combinations like cotechino (a coarse sausage), sauerkraut, and mustard nod to the years Milan spent under Austrian rule. [$]

Via Ambrogio Campiglio, 13
20133 Milano MI, Italy

9. Cantine Isola

Via Paolo Sarpi, 30, 20154 Milano MI, Italy
A selection of wine at Cantine Isola
Photo: Le Cantine Isola / Facebook

This 120-year-old wine shop is located on Chinatown’s main thoroughfare. Although Cantine Isola sells more than 5,000 wines by the bottle, it’s best to stop in and savor the by-the-glass selection, which comes with crostini, charcuterie, and cheese boards. The pairings are themed: For example, when the national soccer team is playing, Cantine Isola serves the best sparkling wines from all over the country for the ultimate soccer-like “formation.” Tuesdays are poetry nights. [$]

Via Paolo Sarpi, 30
20154 Milano MI, Italy

10. Ravioleria Sarpi

Via Paolo Sarpi, 27, 20154 Milano MI, Italy