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A busy street scene outside a chaat stall where diners gather.
The scene at Ashok Chat Corner.
Ajmal Jami/Eater

The 12 Best Chaat Vendors in New Delhi

From perfectly fried aloo chaat at a Netflix-famous stall to tangy chutney-laden papdi chaat at an old city stalwart, here’s where to snack well in New Delhi

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The scene at Ashok Chat Corner.
| Ajmal Jami/Eater

The origins of chaat — a vast family of hundreds of snack dishes that translates literally to “lick” in Urdu and Hindi — remain debated, but Delhi supposedly got a taste for chaat in the 17th century. The story goes that the city’s residents fell ill, possibly from water pollution in the Yamuna river, and Delhi’s Mugal emperor, Shah Jahan (also known for building the Taj Mahal) ordered his courtly hakim (doctor) to instruct the cooks of the city to devise spicy, tangy dishes that could kill the bacteria sickening the populace. Whether or not modern chaat truly descends from this prescription, the cuisine has spread far and wide, creating various dishes in its wake while maintaining certain core principles.

Chaat usually consists of a base of fried ingredients — potatoes, papdi (wheat flour crackers), tikkis (flattened lentil discs) — which are tossed in chutneys like pudina (mint) and saunth (dried ginger and tamarind), and garnished with a custom chaat masala (spice mix), lemon, and herbs. Yet, it remains the most untranslatable branch of South Asian cuisine. Perhaps this is because the flavors are so cleverly balanced that no one has dared entirely demystify them. Or it’s because chaat is usually eaten in crowds or on the go, and so prevents any meditative deconstruction. But perhaps chaat remains entirely elusive from categorization primarily because it is a South Asian cuisine born from whim and is ever-changing. Each plate of chaat can be different from the last, flavored with a secret spice mix devised by a proud chef. There are millions of chaat dishes across India, especially in Delhi, where chaat lives a fluid, fruitful life.

This list excludes pakoras (fritters made from vegetables and lentils), samosas, and kachoris (deep fried snacks filled with onions, potatoes and lentils) because those are entirely different subsects of Indian cuisine and would make this list exhaustingly long. Instead this list offers a guide through the classic and newer elements of chaat that make up Delhi’s culinary landscape.

Sharanya Deepak is a writer and editor from and currently in New Delhi, India. You can read more of her work on her website.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Vaishno Chat Bhandar

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93-E, kolhapur Road, Block E, Kamla Nagar, Delhi
110007, India
088564 45511

Golgappas are symbolic of the chaat world’s impulsive nature, delivering theatrics, color, and explosive flavor. One golgappa (a plate contains six to eight) consists of a fried hollow ball made from suji (semolina) or atta (whole wheat), punctured on top to allow for fillings of boiled potatoes, chickpeas, and tamarind chutney. To serve, a vendor dips each open, filled ball into a large pot of cold, tangy water infused with spices like hing (aesofitedia) and jeera (cumin) and souring agents like tamarind and lemon. Vaishno Chaat Bhandar’s golgappas are some of the city’s most beloved, so be prepared to stand in line with many locals, students, and others who flock to the stall daily. But worry not, since golgappas are eaten in mere seconds, devoured in one bite (otherwise it will break and fall to the ground), and served in succession after each one is eaten. You can ask anyone to point you to the iconic spot, but the shop is easily identifiable, with a sign listing its name in Hindi up front above green doors and windows. And don’t be deterred by the swarming crowd; just jump in.

2. Natraj Dahi Bhalla

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1396, Main Road, beside Central Bank, Sis Ganj Guru Dwara, Kucha Mahajani, Chandni Chowk, New Delhi
Delhi 110006, India

Dishes in the chaat family typically run hot and spicy, but dahi bhalla is a cooling member of the group, particularly coveted in the capital’s scorching, endless summers. The fried lentil dumplings (also called vadas in South India) are soaked in water to soften before they’re served in thick, slightly sweetened yogurt. On top you’ll find chutneys like saunth and pudina, and with fresh spices for garnish like cumin, chaat masala, and salt. Natraj is one of the oldest artists of the dish, which is a bit of a Delhi specialty, with dumplings that are light and soft, paired with yogurt that’s a cooling balm to the capital’s chaos. The shop is a small counter stuck in a wall in the teeming lanes of Old Delhi, but it’s hard to miss considering the constant crowds outside at all times.

3. Vishan Swaroop Chaat Bhandar

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1420/1, Main Chowk Sis Ganj Gurudwara, Chandni Chowk Rd, Kucha Mahajani, Chandni Chowk, New Delhi
Delhi 110006, India

Shakarkandi, which loosely translates to “sweet potatoes,” is a chaat made from steamed tubers garnished with a chaat masala and drizzled generously with lemon. If you are keen on other mouth-puckering sour flavors from South Asia, try the kamrak, or star apple, served alongside the sweet potato. These fresh dishes can often be found on crowded roadsides and outside metro stations where city residents gather to take breaks, and the stalls are easily identified by the stacks of wonky sweet potatoes sitting in a basket over lumps of coal. Bishan Swaroop Chaat Bhandar makes one of the city’s best shakarkandi chaat outside the Sis Ganj Gurudwara in the old city’s Chandni Chowk.

4. Daulat ki Chaat in Chandni Chowk

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112, Raghu Ganj, Manohar Market, Chawri Bazar, Chandni Chowk, Delhi
110006, India
097110 08900

At first glance, there is nothing particularly chaat-like about daulat ki chaat, really more of a dessert than a spicy snack. Soft and souffle-like, it’s composed of a mixture of milk and cream that is cooled on ice overnight, whisked till it is light and frothy, and thickened with khoya (evaporated milk) — but it’s famous for the last step, a quick chill in the dewy morning air. When the daulat ki chaat is set, vendors garnish it with saffron and pistachios, and distribute it from pushcarts as the old city wakes up. The dish is only available in winter, and as the city’s summers grow longer and the winters disappear, daulat ki chaat is in danger of leaving right alongside the cool weather. On a morning walk through the lanes of Chandni Chowk in the old city, look for Sunil Kumar, who serves one of the best versions from a pushcart in front of Shyam Sweets.

5. Hira Lal Chat Corner

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Shop No, 3636, Gali Lohe Wali, Raghu Ganj, Chawri Bazar, Old Delhi, New Delhi
Delhi 110006, India

Old Delhi, the erstwhile capital of the Mugal emperor Shah Jahan, maintains its own specific dialects, customs, and cuisines. Even as other kinds of chaat have leaked into other parts of the city and country, kuliya chaat remains predominantly a specialty in the old city. Specialists hollow out cooked potatoes or sweet potatoes, as well as raw tomatoes and cucumbers, to act as kulhads, or vessels, for boiled chickpeas. The stuffed cups are topped with house spice mixes, pomegranate seeds, and abundant lemon juice. Hira Lal’s shop is more than 100 years old and one of the only shops to concentrate on this lighter, healthier chaat option in the old city. The shop also does a version with seasonal fruits, for which they use a different chaat masala, which is more sour and tangy than their standard spice mix, to bring out the sweetness of the fruit.

6. Ashok Chat Corner

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3488, Hauz Qazi Chowk, Bazar Sirkiwalan, Chawri Bazar, Old Delhi, New Delhi
Delhi 110006, India

This Old Delhi stalwart, a literal hole in the wall on a street corner, is rightfully iconic for a range of crowd-favorite chaat recipes, made from traditional mixes of spices and recipes devised centuries ago. Everything is reliably great, but the specialty is dahi papdi: papdi crackers served with a topping of thick, house-made yogurt, boiled potatoes, and tangy chutneys. It makes a great starter before moving on to other options, with the helpful advice of whichever member of the Jaiswal family is behind the counter; all of them have a preternatural ability to tell customers’ preferences and provide recommendations. Look for the sign for Ashok Chaat in front of the small, colorful space, the steel containers exhibiting various chaat offerings, and the sea of bickering residents who surround the stall at all times of day.

A hand holds a paper bowl of papdi chat covered in colorful chutneys.
Papdi chaat at Ashok Chat Corner.
Ajmal Jami

7. Bittoo Tikki Waale (BTW)

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Shop No G1 & G2 West End Mall, Janakpuri West, Janakpuri District Center, Janakpuri, Delhi
110058, India

Bittoo Tikki Waale, or BTW, is a West Delhi favorite, serving up a unique aloo tikki made from chana dal (Bengal gram), potatoes, and cashews. BTW’s mixture renders a firm, crunchy tikki, beloved for its extra-crackly exterior that gives way to a soft, spiced inner core. The shop also double-fries its tikki in olive oil — a curious choice since tikkis are usually fried in vegetable oil (Indians consider olive oil a luxurious, healthier way to cook, but it’s fairly inaccessible). Usual toppings are pudina and saunth chutney along with yogurt, but you can ask for your own mix. BTW started off as a small pushcart in the 1990s, but grew into a large brand with franchises across the city. The original store is at Netaji Subhash Place, in the city’s northeast, but the brand’s best loved store is in Janakpuri, in the city’s west. Since BTW is more of a small restaurant than a stall, it’s also a convenient option for anyone who needs a seat indoors to escape the summer heat. A small menu of sweets like gulab jamun and kulfi are also available for dessert.

8. Bengali Market

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Bengali Market, Todermal Road Area, Mandi House, New Delhi
Delhi 110001, India

Dilliwalas like to debate if matar kulcha, also called chhole kulche, can be considered chaat. Though the dish could represent a standalone branch of street food (if only for the sheer quantity locals consume), it qualifies in the chaat category through its inclusion in the typical chaat spread at Delhi weddings. The matar consists of chickpeas boiled, spiced to make a mild curry-like dish, and topped with fresh onions, tomatoes, spices, and chopped coriander. Alongside are kulchas, fermented, slightly sour oval-shaped breads. Matar kulchas are served from push carts that can be identified by their large golden brass vessels, which hold the matar. Worthy options are all over the city, but try the stall at Bengali Market in Central Delhi, found in the lane behind the famous Bengali Sweet House. Along with the usual toppings, the small stall adds a condiment of fermented radishes, which adds a nice lift to the rest of the dish’s flavors, and a thin raita that nicely completes the meal.

9. Triveni Terrace Cafe

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205, Tansen Marg, Opp. FICCI Auditorium, Todermal Road Area, Mandi House, New Delhi
Delhi 110001, India
099715 66904

It seems absurd to recommend a chaat dish that is eaten sitting down, but even the residents of Delhi sometimes need a moment of rest. Triveni, a cafe that operates in an art gallery in central Delhi, serves some of the city’s best palak patta chaat. Leaves of spinach are coated in besan or gram flour, fried into fritters, and topped with yogurt, mint, and tamarind chutneys, chopped onions, and sev (small pieces of spiced crunchy noodle-like snacks made from fried chickpea flour). Palak patta chaat is a classic Delhi favorite, though it hasn’t caught hold as tightly among younger generations, and it could soon begin disappearing. Triveni’s version is a perfect tea-time snack, and it goes especially well with chai.

10. Mangala Chat Wale

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Acharya Niketan Maine Market, Pocket 5, Pratap Nagar, Mayur Vihar, New Delhi
Delhi 110091, India
079823 46608

This small stall used to be a neighborhood secret before Dalchand Kashyap, the shop’s owner, was featured on Netflix’s Street Food: Asia. But no amount of hype has compromised the quality of Mangala’s aloo chaat. Bite-sized potatoes are perfectly fried and tossed in chutneys of pudina and saunth, before they’re drizzled with lemon juice and a house special spice mix. Kashyap’s aloo chaat is always perfectly crispy, garnished with grated radish, beetroots, carrots, and herbs on request. The aloo tikki is equally beloved by locals; the flattened, fried cutlets of potato and lentils come with the same toppings as the aloo chaat. The shop is in a corner of the neighborhood’s bustling market; just look for the large sign for Aggarwal Sweets, a large sweet shop that stands opposite Kashyap’s smaller shop.

Someone holds up a piece of potato on a skewer from a bowl of aloo chaat.
Aloo chaat at Mangala.
Ajmal Jami/Eater

11. Bombay Bhel Puri

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865, Maharishi Dayanand Marg, Sector 29, Noida
Uttar Pradesh 201303, India
0120 253 3031

If you can’t make your way to Mumbai, the real center of bhel puri, there are stalls that serve the dish in Delhi too, like this one in Brahmaputra Market out in the eastern suburb of Noida. Puffed rice is tossed with onions, tomatoes, chopped coriander, chutneys of tamarind and mint, and garnished with sev (small pieces of spiced crunchy chickpea noodles) to make a snack that’s light on the stomach and great for hot weather. To find the stall, look near Evergreen Sweets, a large shop serving packaged street food and Indianized pizzas; the small but resolute business advertises itself with a metal board that reads “Bombay Bhel Puri” in English.

12. Raju Chaat Corner

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C-407, near, Bipin Chandra Pal Marg, Block C, Chittaranjan Park, New Delhi
Delhi 110019, India
098735 09877

The markets in Chittaranjan Park, the Bengali neighborhood of south Delhi, are a glimpse into the varied cuisines of West Bengal and its capital Kolkata. Among the fried cutlets, Calcutta rolls, and biryani at the area’s Market No. 1, you’ll find the Raju Chaat Corner stall serving puchkas, the Bengali version of golgappas. Puchkas consist of crispy, hollow balls made from suji (semolina), stuffed with saunth, potatoes, and chickpeas before they’re dunked in cold, tangy water infused with different spices and souring agents. Some citizens of Kolkata stake a claim that puchka is a subtler, superior version of its North Indian counterpart, owing to the lightness of suji as a fried vessel. That argument could go on and on, but Raju Chaat Corner offers the best argument for the Bengali side, serving puchkas that are always crisp, refreshing, and satisfying.

1. Vaishno Chat Bhandar

93-E, kolhapur Road, Block E, Kamla Nagar, Delhi, 110007, India

Golgappas are symbolic of the chaat world’s impulsive nature, delivering theatrics, color, and explosive flavor. One golgappa (a plate contains six to eight) consists of a fried hollow ball made from suji (semolina) or atta (whole wheat), punctured on top to allow for fillings of boiled potatoes, chickpeas, and tamarind chutney. To serve, a vendor dips each open, filled ball into a large pot of cold, tangy water infused with spices like hing (aesofitedia) and jeera (cumin) and souring agents like tamarind and lemon. Vaishno Chaat Bhandar’s golgappas are some of the city’s most beloved, so be prepared to stand in line with many locals, students, and others who flock to the stall daily. But worry not, since golgappas are eaten in mere seconds, devoured in one bite (otherwise it will break and fall to the ground), and served in succession after each one is eaten. You can ask anyone to point you to the iconic spot, but the shop is easily identifiable, with a sign listing its name in Hindi up front above green doors and windows. And don’t be deterred by the swarming crowd; just jump in.

93-E, kolhapur Road, Block E, Kamla Nagar, Delhi
110007, India

2. Natraj Dahi Bhalla

1396, Main Road, beside Central Bank, Sis Ganj Guru Dwara, Kucha Mahajani, Chandni Chowk, New Delhi, Delhi 110006, India

Dishes in the chaat family typically run hot and spicy, but dahi bhalla is a cooling member of the group, particularly coveted in the capital’s scorching, endless summers. The fried lentil dumplings (also called vadas in South India) are soaked in water to soften before they’re served in thick, slightly sweetened yogurt. On top you’ll find chutneys like saunth and pudina, and with fresh spices for garnish like cumin, chaat masala, and salt. Natraj is one of the oldest artists of the dish, which is a bit of a Delhi specialty, with dumplings that are light and soft, paired with yogurt that’s a cooling balm to the capital’s chaos. The shop is a small counter stuck in a wall in the teeming lanes of Old Delhi, but it’s hard to miss considering the constant crowds outside at all times.

1396, Main Road, beside Central Bank, Sis Ganj Guru Dwara, Kucha Mahajani, Chandni Chowk, New Delhi
Delhi 110006, India

3. Vishan Swaroop Chaat Bhandar

1420/1, Main Chowk Sis Ganj Gurudwara, Chandni Chowk Rd, Kucha Mahajani, Chandni Chowk, New Delhi, Delhi 110006, India

Shakarkandi, which loosely translates to “sweet potatoes,” is a chaat made from steamed tubers garnished with a chaat masala and drizzled generously with lemon. If you are keen on other mouth-puckering sour flavors from South Asia, try the kamrak, or star apple, served alongside the sweet potato. These fresh dishes can often be found on crowded roadsides and outside metro stations where city residents gather to take breaks, and the stalls are easily identified by the stacks of wonky sweet potatoes sitting in a basket over lumps of coal. Bishan Swaroop Chaat Bhandar makes one of the city’s best shakarkandi chaat outside the Sis Ganj Gurudwara in the old city’s Chandni Chowk.

1420/1, Main Chowk Sis Ganj Gurudwara, Chandni Chowk Rd, Kucha Mahajani, Chandni Chowk, New Delhi
Delhi 110006, India

4. Daulat ki Chaat in Chandni Chowk

112, Raghu Ganj, Manohar Market, Chawri Bazar, Chandni Chowk, Delhi, 110006, India

At first glance, there is nothing particularly chaat-like about daulat ki chaat, really more of a dessert than a spicy snack. Soft and souffle-like, it’s composed of a mixture of milk and cream that is cooled on ice overnight, whisked till it is light and frothy, and thickened with khoya (evaporated milk) — but it’s famous for the last step, a quick chill in the dewy morning air. When the daulat ki chaat is set, vendors garnish it with saffron and pistachios, and distribute it from pushcarts as the old city wakes up. The dish is only available in winter, and as the city’s summers grow longer and the winters disappear, daulat ki chaat is in danger of leaving right alongside the cool weather. On a morning walk through the lanes of Chandni Chowk in the old city, look for Sunil Kumar, who serves one of the best versions from a pushcart in front of Shyam Sweets.

112, Raghu Ganj, Manohar Market, Chawri Bazar, Chandni Chowk, Delhi
110006, India

5. Hira Lal Chat Corner

Shop No, 3636, Gali Lohe Wali, Raghu Ganj, Chawri Bazar, Old Delhi, New Delhi, Delhi 110006, India

Old Delhi, the erstwhile capital of the Mugal emperor Shah Jahan, maintains its own specific dialects, customs, and cuisines. Even as other kinds of chaat have leaked into other parts of the city and country, kuliya chaat remains predominantly a specialty in the old city. Specialists hollow out cooked potatoes or sweet potatoes, as well as raw tomatoes and cucumbers, to act as kulhads, or vessels, for boiled chickpeas. The stuffed cups are topped with house spice mixes, pomegranate seeds, and abundant lemon juice. Hira Lal’s shop is more than 100 years old and one of the only shops to concentrate on this lighter, healthier chaat option in the old city. The shop also does a version with seasonal fruits, for which they use a different chaat masala, which is more sour and tangy than their standard spice mix, to bring out the sweetness of the fruit.

Shop No, 3636, Gali Lohe Wali, Raghu Ganj, Chawri Bazar, Old Delhi, New Delhi
Delhi 110006, India

6. Ashok Chat Corner

3488, Hauz Qazi Chowk, Bazar Sirkiwalan, Chawri Bazar, Old Delhi, New Delhi, Delhi 110006, India
A hand holds a paper bowl of papdi chat covered in colorful chutneys.
Papdi chaat at Ashok Chat Corner.
Ajmal Jami

This Old Delhi stalwart, a literal hole in the wall on a street corner, is rightfully iconic for a range of crowd-favorite chaat recipes, made from traditional mixes of spices and recipes devised centuries ago. Everything is reliably great, but the specialty is dahi papdi: papdi crackers served with a topping of thick, house-made yogurt, boiled potatoes, and tangy chutneys. It makes a great starter before moving on to other options, with the helpful advice of whichever member of the Jaiswal family is behind the counter; all of them have a preternatural ability to tell customers’ preferences and provide recommendations. Look for the sign for Ashok Chaat in front of the small, colorful space, the steel containers exhibiting various chaat offerings, and the sea of bickering residents who surround the stall at all times of day.

3488, Hauz Qazi Chowk, Bazar Sirkiwalan, Chawri Bazar, Old Delhi, New Delhi
Delhi 110006, India

7. Bittoo Tikki Waale (BTW)

Shop No G1 & G2 West End Mall, Janakpuri West, Janakpuri District Center, Janakpuri, Delhi, 110058, India

Bittoo Tikki Waale, or BTW, is a West Delhi favorite, serving up a unique aloo tikki made from chana dal (Bengal gram), potatoes, and cashews. BTW’s mixture renders a firm, crunchy tikki, beloved for its extra-crackly exterior that gives way to a soft, spiced inner core. The shop also double-fries its tikki in olive oil — a curious choice since tikkis are usually fried in vegetable oil (Indians consider olive oil a luxurious, healthier way to cook, but it’s fairly inaccessible). Usual toppings are pudina and saunth chutney along with yogurt, but you can ask for your own mix. BTW started off as a small pushcart in the 1990s, but grew into a large brand with franchises across the city. The original store is at Netaji Subhash Place, in the city’s northeast, but the brand’s best loved store is in Janakpuri, in the city’s west. Since BTW is more of a small restaurant than a stall, it’s also a convenient option for anyone who needs a seat indoors to escape the summer heat. A small menu of sweets like gulab jamun and kulfi are also available for dessert.

Shop No G1 & G2 West End Mall, Janakpuri West, Janakpuri District Center, Janakpuri, Delhi
110058, India

8. Bengali Market

Bengali Market, Todermal Road Area, Mandi House, New Delhi, Delhi 110001, India

Dilliwalas like to debate if matar kulcha, also called chhole kulche, can be considered chaat. Though the dish could represent a standalone branch of street food (if only for the sheer quantity locals consume), it qualifies in the chaat category through its inclusion in the typical chaat spread at Delhi weddings. The matar consists of chickpeas boiled, spiced to make a mild curry-like dish, and topped with fresh onions, tomatoes, spices, and chopped coriander. Alongside are kulchas, fermented, slightly sour oval-shaped breads. Matar kulchas are served from push carts that can be identified by their large golden brass vessels, which hold the matar. Worthy options are all over the city, but try the stall at Bengali Market in Central Delhi, found in the lane behind the famous Bengali Sweet House. Along with the usual toppings, the small stall adds a condiment of fermented radishes, which adds a nice lift to the rest of the dish’s flavors, and a thin raita that nicely completes the meal.

Bengali Market, Todermal Road Area, Mandi House, New Delhi
Delhi 110001, India

9. Triveni Terrace Cafe

205, Tansen Marg, Opp. FICCI Auditorium, Todermal Road Area, Mandi House, New Delhi, Delhi 110001, India

It seems absurd to recommend a chaat dish that is eaten sitting down, but even the residents of Delhi sometimes need a moment of rest. Triveni, a cafe that operates in an art gallery in central Delhi, serves some of the city’s best palak patta chaat. Leaves of spinach are coated in besan or gram flour, fried into fritters, and topped with yogurt, mint, and tamarind chutneys, chopped onions, and sev (small pieces of spiced crunchy noodle-like snacks made from fried chickpea flour). Palak patta chaat is a classic Delhi favorite, though it hasn’t caught hold as tightly among younger generations, and it could soon begin disappearing. Triveni’s version is a perfect tea-time snack, and it goes especially well with chai.

205, Tansen Marg, Opp. FICCI Auditorium, Todermal Road Area, Mandi House, New Delhi
Delhi 110001, India

10. Mangala Chat Wale

Acharya Niketan Maine Market, Pocket 5, Pratap Nagar, Mayur Vihar, New Delhi, Delhi 110091, India
Someone holds up a piece of potato on a skewer from a bowl of aloo chaat.
Aloo chaat at Mangala.
Ajmal Jami/Eater

This small stall used to be a neighborhood secret before Dalchand Kashyap, the shop’s owner, was featured on Netflix’s Street Food: Asia. But no amount of hype has compromised the quality of Mangala’s aloo chaat. Bite-sized potatoes are perfectly fried and tossed in chutneys of pudina and saunth, before they’re drizzled with lemon juice and a house special spice mix. Kashyap’s aloo chaat is always perfectly crispy, garnished with grated radish, beetroots, carrots, and herbs on request. The aloo tikki is equally beloved by locals; the flattened, fried cutlets of potato and lentils come with the same toppings as the aloo chaat. The shop is in a corner of the neighborhood’s bustling market; just look for the large sign for Aggarwal Sweets, a large sweet shop that stands opposite Kashyap’s smaller shop.

Acharya Niketan Maine Market, Pocket 5, Pratap Nagar, Mayur Vihar, New Delhi
Delhi 110091, India

11. Bombay Bhel Puri

865, Maharishi Dayanand Marg, Sector 29, Noida, Uttar Pradesh 201303, India

If you can’t make your way to Mumbai, the real center of bhel puri, there are stalls that serve the dish in Delhi too, like this one in Brahmaputra Market out in the eastern suburb of Noida. Puffed rice is tossed with onions, tomatoes, chopped coriander, chutneys of tamarind and mint, and garnished with sev (small pieces of spiced crunchy chickpea noodles) to make a snack that’s light on the stomach and great for hot weather. To find the stall, look near Evergreen Sweets, a large shop serving packaged street food and Indianized pizzas; the small but resolute business advertises itself with a metal board that reads “Bombay Bhel Puri” in English.

865, Maharishi Dayanand Marg, Sector 29, Noida
Uttar Pradesh 201303, India

12. Raju Chaat Corner

C-407, near, Bipin Chandra Pal Marg, Block C, Chittaranjan Park, New Delhi, Delhi 110019, India

The markets in Chittaranjan Park, the Bengali neighborhood of south Delhi, are a glimpse into the varied cuisines of West Bengal and its capital Kolkata. Among the fried cutlets, Calcutta rolls, and biryani at the area’s Market No. 1, you’ll find the Raju Chaat Corner stall serving puchkas, the Bengali version of golgappas. Puchkas consist of crispy, hollow balls made from suji (semolina), stuffed with saunth, potatoes, and chickpeas before they’re dunked in cold, tangy water infused with different spices and souring agents. Some citizens of Kolkata stake a claim that puchka is a subtler, superior version of its North Indian counterpart, owing to the lightness of suji as a fried vessel. That argument could go on and on, but Raju Chaat Corner offers the best argument for the Bengali side, serving puchkas that are always crisp, refreshing, and satisfying.

C-407, near, Bipin Chandra Pal Marg, Block C, Chittaranjan Park, New Delhi
Delhi 110019, India

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