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A chef delicately piles slices of raw fish in a deep blue bowl.
The finishing touches on the Tobiche at Tomo.
Jimena Agois

The 12 Best Cebicherias in Lima

From dishes featuring local seafood like cabrilla and purple crab, to rule-breaking chirashi cebiche and a version with grilled grouper, here’s where to eat cebiche in Lima

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The finishing touches on the Tobiche at Tomo.
| Jimena Agois

Ceviche, typically spelled “cebiche” in Peru, is like the country’s national anthem. The democratic dish is offered in specialized cebicherias, casual neighborhood spots, and sophisticated fine-dining restaurants. In its simplest form, cebiche is just cubed raw fish, dressed in leche de tigre (lime juice, salt, chile, onion, and the natural juices from the fish), often served with boiled sweet potato, thinly sliced red onion, choclo (large Andean corn), lettuce, and canchita (corn nuts). No matter how it’s prepared, cebiche is a source of pride and an object of devotion.

The traditional recipe in Lima once called for marinating the fish in lime juice for up to 12 hours, using the acidity of the lime to “cook” the fish. As local Nikkei restaurants introduced more Peruvian diners to Japanese preparations of raw fish in the 1970s, dining preferences began to shift; today, a much faster style of making cebiche, with raw fish barely zapped by lime, is the most popular option (and is similar to how fishing communities have long enjoyed their cebiche in northern Peru). The next turn for Lima’s cebiche came about 20 years ago, when the dish went global. Chefs took it to Michelin-starred restaurants in Hong Kong, London, and New York, gaining the dish worldwide culinary recognition and establishing Lima as one of the great gastronomic capitals — which in turn fueled plenty more cebicherias in the city.

Gathering a list of Lima’s best cebiches is a difficult task, not only because there are many options from world-renowned chefs, but also because Limeños are very demanding when it comes to their culinary traditions. Today chefs are upgrading the dish too, enhancing their leche de tigre with smoked pepper or ginger, playing with the texture of sweet potato with glaze or tempura batter, adding avocado or capers to the medley, and bolstering the mix with fried calamari, octopus, or fried fish skin. But good cebiche doesn’t require razzle-dazzle; it relies on fresh fish (or shellfish), careful balance of acid and spice, temperature, and perfect harmony between all the ingredients. Here are a few of the most outstanding cebiches in Lima.

Liliana López Sorzano is a food and travel writer based between Mexico City and Bogotá, Colombia, where she contributes to local and international media. She is a former editor-in-chief at Food & Wine in Spanish.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Don Fernando Restaurante

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General Garzón 1788 Jesus Maria Municipalidad Metropolitana de Lima LIMA
Jesús María 11, Peru

It isn’t easy to choose one option from the excellent variety of cebiches at this unassuming restaurant in the Jesús María neighborhood, an area that’s off the beaten track for a lot of tourists. Don Fernando specializes in traditional northern Peruvian food, and the quality of their seafood is fantastic. Opt for the elegant purple crab cebiche; the species is only found on the Pacific coast from Ecuador down to northern Chile, and it isn’t commonly served, even in Lima. The leche de tigre is made with smashed crab meat from the claws, which is sweet and delicate, combined with seafood broth, salt, a little bit of garlic, ají limo (a spicy and tasty chile), lime juice, cilantro, and rocotos (red hot Peruvian peppers).

Large hunks of purple crab in a pool of sauce beside a large grilled red pepper.
Purple crab cebiche.
Don Fernando Restaurante

2. Chez Wong

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Enrique León García 114
La Victoria 15034, Peru

Chef legend Javier Wong has been perfecting the art of cebiche preparation for more than 50 years — which justifies the hoops you have to jump through to dine on his food. His humble restaurant of six to eight tables in the La Victoria neighborhood (which is also his home) has no sign, no walk-ins are allowed, and reservations must be made for lunch from Tuesday to Saturday. His cebiche is worth it, with clean, vibrant flavors from a few excellent ingredients. He only uses Dover sole, which he delicately douses with lime juice, salt, and pepper, before topping it with thinly sliced red onion and chunks of perfectly cooked octopus. While other chefs might fuss with sweet potato, corn, spicy chile, or lettuce, there’s none of that here. Wong lets the fish shine on its own, and he makes all the food right in front of his guests.

A long plate of ceviche including octopus and onion.
Cebiche from Chez Wong.
Alexander Quesquen

3. Shizen Restaurante Nikkei

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Av. Los Conquistadores 999
San Isidro 15074, Peru

This restaurant, which honors Nikkei food, was born in 2018 under the command of three young chefs, Mayra Flores, Coco Tomita, and Renato Kanashiro. The trio don’t shy away from innovation, especially with their daring chirashi cebiche, which breaks any established code to either dish. The chefs top a base of sushi rice with sashimi, a mix of octopus, tuna, salmon, and market fish, then layer on chalaca (a Peruvian blend of onion, cilantro, and chile), smoked yellow chile leche de tigre, and sweet potato tempura. It’s a flavor bomb.

A pile of various fish and seafood cuts topped with onion and cilantro, in a pool of yellow sauce.
Chirashi cebiche.
Shizen Restaurante Nikkei

4. Mayta Restaurante

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Av. Mariscal La Mar 1285
Miraflores 15027, Peru

In the last few years, as Mayta has landed spots on numerous Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants lists, chef Jaime Pesaque has edged from a casual vibe toward fine dining. That refined instinct is obvious in sophisticated dishes like the cebiche amazónico, which showcases a unique combination of flavors: seasonal white fish, Amazonian ginger, charapita (a small, powerful chile from the Amazon) in place of the usual limo chile, caramelized sweet plantains instead of sweet potato, and thin plantain chips for crunch factor.

Plantain chips surround a mound in a deep ceramic dish, with a saucer of sauce beside.
Cebiche amazónico.
Mayta Restaurante

5. El Mercado de Rafael

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Av. Hipólito Unanue 203
Miraflores 15074, Peru

Rafael Osterling’s lunchtime-only cebicheria is all about honoring Peruvian cuisine with quality ingredients in a festive, energetic atmosphere. The namesake cebiche el Mercado might be the most popular choice on offer; the kitchen combines the catch of the day with ají amarillo (Peruvian yellow pepper), leche de tigre, and crunchy fried calamari, creating an outstanding contrast of textures and temperatures.

A pile of seafood filling an entire plate, coming to a peak in one place with sliced onions and sprigs of cilantro.
Cebiche el Mercado.
El Mercado de Rafael

6. La Mar Cevichería Peruana

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Av. Mariscal La Mar 770
Miraflores 15074, Peru

Since Gastón Acurio opened his cebicheria in Lima 17 years ago, it has expanded to locations in Buenos Aires, Bogotá, San Francisco, Santiago de Chile, and Miami, but the original continues to set the bar for great seafood. The menu features various styles of cebiche, from the popular cebiche de conchas negras (mangrove cockles), to the fusion cebiche Lima-Seoul with Korean chilies, to cebiche de erizos de Marcona (Marcona sea urchin). But if you’re after a cebiche to remember, go for cebiche fogoso, which includes crab, sea urchin, market fish, and mangrove cockles dressed up with a leche de tigre of rocotos (red hot Peruvian peppers).

A bowl of cebiche with large crab claws sticking out, alongside large hunks of sweet potato, greens, and sea urchin.
Cebiche fogoso.
La Mar Cevichería Peruana

7. Al Toke Pez

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Av. Angamos 886
Surquillo 15047, Peru

Chef Tomas Matsufuji is well-known for his excellent seasoning and skills at this casual Surquillo hangout. Unpretentious and straightforward, the cebiche carretillero (wheelbarrow) dish is inspired by versions served out of small carts at local markets. The type of fish rotates based on availability and seasonality, but it’s always diced and bathed with a powerful leche de tigre that includes garlic, ginger, celery, onion, lime, and for those who like a little spice, ají limo, alongside the usual suspects like chicharron de calamar (fried calamari), sweet potato, corn cob, and corn nuts. Don’t expect a delicate touch; this is pure flavor overload.

A plate of sliced fish mounded on top of corn nuts, chicharron de calamar, and sweet potato.
Cebiche carretillero.
Al Toke Pez

8. La Picantería

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Francisco Moreno 388
Surquillo 15047, Peru

This restaurant in the Surquillo neighborhood is known for its magnificent display of fresh fish on the counter and the generous portions served at shared tables. Diners usually have their choice of fish and its preparation. Among the cebiches, choose the one made with cabrilla, a fish with dark meat and full flavor from southern Peru that doesn’t show up often in menus. The cebiche is otherwise classic, with refreshing acidity, though chef Héctor Solís does add a few spins by frying the fish skin to a supreme crunch and glazing sweet potato to give it more power.

Cubes of pink fish beneath a crosswise slice of pepper, beside other fixings.
Cebiche from La Picantería.
La Picantería

9. Tomo Cocina Nikkei

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Francisco de Paula Camino 260
Cercado de Lima 15038, Peru

Jeremy López and Francisco Sime, two former chefs of Latin America 50 Best restaurant Maido, founded this Nikkei cuisine restaurant at the end of 2018. Their cebiche, listed on the menu as Tobiche, has gained plenty of followers. Although overall it’s quite classic, the chefs add a few spins, like twirling sashimi-like slices of market fish into roses and incorporating pearls of cushuro, aka Andean caviar, an alga found in high-altitude waters. It also includes chalaquita (a Peruvian mix of onion, cilantro, and chile), squid chicharron, and a tasty leche de tigre made with smoked yellow pepper that adds a complex layer to the dish.

Swirls of fish slices in a milky yellow sauce, served in a deep blue bowl on a wooden countertop.
Tobiche.
Jimena Agois

10. Fiesta Restaurant

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Av. Reducto 1276
Miraflores 15074, Peru

Even before Lima switched from cebiche long-cooked in lime to the quicker marinating style popular with Nikkei cooks, in northern Peru cebiche was prepared instantly, barely caressed by the lime. When chef Héctor Solís first opened Fiesta, a restaurant that celebrates the culinary heritage of the north, he found customers in Lima still weren’t used to eating fish so raw, and they often ordered the fish cooked. Uncomfortable cooking the fish with lime juice, Solís tried several alternatives before landing on charcoal-grilled cebiche, partly inspired by a Mochica dish from his ancestors. Today, for his grilled murique grouper cebiche, Solís uses a chicha de jora (fermented maize drink), which gives it a complex flavor, and he wraps the fish in corn husks when it goes on the grill. The result is fresh and hearty, arriving at the table in a coat of coal smoke.

A square of grilled fish presented in a pool of sauce on a corn husk.
Charcoal-grilled cebiche.
Fiesta Restaurant

11. Canta Rana

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Genova 101
Barranco 15063, Peru

Adding avocado and capers to cebiche was almost considered heresy a decade ago when the Furgiuele family premiered the cebiche apaltado at Canta Rana in the Barranco neighborhood, but today the dish generates less controversy and more lines of customers. Now one of the stars of the menu, the dish perfectly incorporates creamy avocado with boiled sweet potato, capers, unbelievably crispy fried squid, and corn kernels — all while nailing the proper temperature and acidity.

Ceviche topped with large, sliced avocado half, dotted with corn kernels.
Cebiche apaltado.
Jimena Agois

12. Isolina

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Av. San Martín 101
Barranco 15063, Peru

This old tavern in the bohemian neighborhood of Barranco, owned by chef José del Castillo, offers traditional and homey recipes from Lima. Isolina’s cebiche, tasty and honest, is considered a classic. It’s made with the freshest catch, boiled sweet potato, red onion, canchita (corn nuts), choclo (large kernel corn), and a perfectly battered fried octopus that adds a touch of elegance to this dish.

A plate of sliced fish alongside sweet potato slices, fried octopus, corn, corn nuts, and other fixings.
Isolina’s cebiche.
Isolina

1. Don Fernando Restaurante

General Garzón 1788 Jesus Maria Municipalidad Metropolitana de Lima LIMA, Jesús María 11, Peru
Large hunks of purple crab in a pool of sauce beside a large grilled red pepper.
Purple crab cebiche.
Don Fernando Restaurante

It isn’t easy to choose one option from the excellent variety of cebiches at this unassuming restaurant in the Jesús María neighborhood, an area that’s off the beaten track for a lot of tourists. Don Fernando specializes in traditional northern Peruvian food, and the quality of their seafood is fantastic. Opt for the elegant purple crab cebiche; the species is only found on the Pacific coast from Ecuador down to northern Chile, and it isn’t commonly served, even in Lima. The leche de tigre is made with smashed crab meat from the claws, which is sweet and delicate, combined with seafood broth, salt, a little bit of garlic, ají limo (a spicy and tasty chile), lime juice, cilantro, and rocotos (red hot Peruvian peppers).

General Garzón 1788 Jesus Maria Municipalidad Metropolitana de Lima LIMA
Jesús María 11, Peru

2. Chez Wong

Enrique León García 114, La Victoria 15034, Peru
A long plate of ceviche including octopus and onion.
Cebiche from Chez Wong.
Alexander Quesquen

Chef legend Javier Wong has been perfecting the art of cebiche preparation for more than 50 years — which justifies the hoops you have to jump through to dine on his food. His humble restaurant of six to eight tables in the La Victoria neighborhood (which is also his home) has no sign, no walk-ins are allowed, and reservations must be made for lunch from Tuesday to Saturday. His cebiche is worth it, with clean, vibrant flavors from a few excellent ingredients. He only uses Dover sole, which he delicately douses with lime juice, salt, and pepper, before topping it with thinly sliced red onion and chunks of perfectly cooked octopus. While other chefs might fuss with sweet potato, corn, spicy chile, or lettuce, there’s none of that here. Wong lets the fish shine on its own, and he makes all the food right in front of his guests.

Enrique León García 114
La Victoria 15034, Peru

3. Shizen Restaurante Nikkei

Av. Los Conquistadores 999, San Isidro 15074, Peru
A pile of various fish and seafood cuts topped with onion and cilantro, in a pool of yellow sauce.
Chirashi cebiche.
Shizen Restaurante Nikkei

This restaurant, which honors Nikkei food, was born in 2018 under the command of three young chefs, Mayra Flores, Coco Tomita, and Renato Kanashiro. The trio don’t shy away from innovation, especially with their daring chirashi cebiche, which breaks any established code to either dish. The chefs top a base of sushi rice with sashimi, a mix of octopus, tuna, salmon, and market fish, then layer on chalaca (a Peruvian blend of onion, cilantro, and chile), smoked yellow chile leche de tigre, and sweet potato tempura. It’s a flavor bomb.

Av. Los Conquistadores 999
San Isidro 15074, Peru

4. Mayta Restaurante

Av. Mariscal La Mar 1285, Miraflores 15027, Peru
Plantain chips surround a mound in a deep ceramic dish, with a saucer of sauce beside.
Cebiche amazónico.
Mayta Restaurante

In the last few years, as Mayta has landed spots on numerous Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants lists, chef Jaime Pesaque has edged from a casual vibe toward fine dining. That refined instinct is obvious in sophisticated dishes like the cebiche amazónico, which showcases a unique combination of flavors: seasonal white fish, Amazonian ginger, charapita (a small, powerful chile from the Amazon) in place of the usual limo chile, caramelized sweet plantains instead of sweet potato, and thin plantain chips for crunch factor.

Av. Mariscal La Mar 1285
Miraflores 15027, Peru

5. El Mercado de Rafael

Av. Hipólito Unanue 203, Miraflores 15074, Peru
A pile of seafood filling an entire plate, coming to a peak in one place with sliced onions and sprigs of cilantro.
Cebiche el Mercado.
El Mercado de Rafael

Rafael Osterling’s lunchtime-only cebicheria is all about honoring Peruvian cuisine with quality ingredients in a festive, energetic atmosphere. The namesake cebiche el Mercado might be the most popular choice on offer; the kitchen combines the catch of the day with ají amarillo (Peruvian yellow pepper), leche de tigre, and crunchy fried calamari, creating an outstanding contrast of textures and temperatures.

Av. Hipólito Unanue 203
Miraflores 15074, Peru

6. La Mar Cevichería Peruana

Av. Mariscal La Mar 770, Miraflores 15074, Peru
A bowl of cebiche with large crab claws sticking out, alongside large hunks of sweet potato, greens, and sea urchin.
Cebiche fogoso.
La Mar Cevichería Peruana

Since Gastón Acurio opened his cebicheria in Lima 17 years ago, it has expanded to locations in Buenos Aires, Bogotá, San Francisco, Santiago de Chile, and Miami, but the original continues to set the bar for great seafood. The menu features various styles of cebiche, from the popular cebiche de conchas negras (mangrove cockles), to the fusion cebiche Lima-Seoul with Korean chilies, to cebiche de erizos de Marcona (Marcona sea urchin). But if you’re after a cebiche to remember, go for cebiche fogoso, which includes crab, sea urchin, market fish, and mangrove cockles dressed up with a leche de tigre of rocotos (red hot Peruvian peppers).

Av. Mariscal La Mar 770
Miraflores 15074, Peru

7. Al Toke Pez

Av. Angamos 886, Surquillo 15047, Peru
A plate of sliced fish mounded on top of corn nuts, chicharron de calamar, and sweet potato.
Cebiche carretillero.
Al Toke Pez

Chef Tomas Matsufuji is well-known for his excellent seasoning and skills at this casual Surquillo hangout. Unpretentious and straightforward, the cebiche carretillero (wheelbarrow) dish is inspired by versions served out of small carts at local markets. The type of fish rotates based on availability and seasonality, but it’s always diced and bathed with a powerful leche de tigre that includes garlic, ginger, celery, onion, lime, and for those who like a little spice, ají limo, alongside the usual suspects like chicharron de calamar (fried calamari), sweet potato, corn cob, and corn nuts. Don’t expect a delicate touch; this is pure flavor overload.

Av. Angamos 886
Surquillo 15047, Peru

8. La Picantería

Francisco Moreno 388, Surquillo 15047, Peru
Cubes of pink fish beneath a crosswise slice of pepper, beside other fixings.
Cebiche from La Picantería.
La Picantería

This restaurant in the Surquillo neighborhood is known for its magnificent display of fresh fish on the counter and the generous portions served at shared tables. Diners usually have their choice of fish and its preparation. Among the cebiches, choose the one made with cabrilla, a fish with dark meat and full flavor from southern Peru that doesn’t show up often in menus. The cebiche is otherwise classic, with refreshing acidity, though chef Héctor Solís does add a few spins by frying the fish skin to a supreme crunch and glazing sweet potato to give it more power.

Francisco Moreno 388
Surquillo 15047, Peru

9. Tomo Cocina Nikkei

Francisco de Paula Camino 260, Cercado de Lima 15038, Peru
Swirls of fish slices in a milky yellow sauce, served in a deep blue bowl on a wooden countertop.
Tobiche.
Jimena Agois

Jeremy López and Francisco Sime, two former chefs of Latin America 50 Best restaurant Maido, founded this Nikkei cuisine restaurant at the end of 2018. Their cebiche, listed on the menu as Tobiche, has gained plenty of followers. Although overall it’s quite classic, the chefs add a few spins, like twirling sashimi-like slices of market fish into roses and incorporating pearls of cushuro, aka Andean caviar, an alga found in high-altitude waters. It also includes chalaquita (a Peruvian mix of onion, cilantro, and chile), squid chicharron, and a tasty leche de tigre made with smoked yellow pepper that adds a complex layer to the dish.

Francisco de Paula Camino 260
Cercado de Lima 15038, Peru

10. Fiesta Restaurant

Av. Reducto 1276, Miraflores 15074, Peru
A square of grilled fish presented in a pool of sauce on a corn husk.
Charcoal-grilled cebiche.
Fiesta Restaurant

Even before Lima switched from cebiche long-cooked in lime to the quicker marinating style popular with Nikkei cooks, in northern Peru cebiche was prepared instantly, barely caressed by the lime. When chef Héctor Solís first opened Fiesta, a restaurant that celebrates the culinary heritage of the north, he found customers in Lima still weren’t used to eating fish so raw, and they often ordered the fish cooked. Uncomfortable cooking the fish with lime juice, Solís tried several alternatives before landing on charcoal-grilled cebiche, partly inspired by a Mochica dish from his ancestors. Today, for his grilled murique grouper cebiche, Solís uses a chicha de jora (fermented maize drink), which gives it a complex flavor, and he wraps the fish in corn husks when it goes on the grill. The result is fresh and hearty, arriving at the table in a coat of coal smoke.

Av. Reducto 1276
Miraflores 15074, Peru

11. Canta Rana

Genova 101, Barranco 15063, Peru
Ceviche topped with large, sliced avocado half, dotted with corn kernels.
Cebiche apaltado.
Jimena Agois

Adding avocado and capers to cebiche was almost considered heresy a decade ago when the Furgiuele family premiered the cebiche apaltado at Canta Rana in the Barranco neighborhood, but today the dish generates less controversy and more lines of customers. Now one of the stars of the menu, the dish perfectly incorporates creamy avocado with boiled sweet potato, capers, unbelievably crispy fried squid, and corn kernels — all while nailing the proper temperature and acidity.

Genova 101
Barranco 15063, Peru

12. Isolina

Av. San Martín 101, Barranco 15063, Peru
A plate of sliced fish alongside sweet potato slices, fried octopus, corn, corn nuts, and other fixings.
Isolina’s cebiche.
Isolina

This old tavern in the bohemian neighborhood of Barranco, owned by chef José del Castillo, offers traditional and homey recipes from Lima. Isolina’s cebiche, tasty and honest, is considered a classic. It’s made with the freshest catch, boiled sweet potato, red onion, canchita (corn nuts), choclo (large kernel corn), and a perfectly battered fried octopus that adds a touch of elegance to this dish.

Av. San Martín 101
Barranco 15063, Peru

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