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Diners sit at a series of long communal tables beneath a colorful glass ceiling in a wide open food hall
El Patio de los Lecheros
El Patio de los Lecheros

The 38 Essential Restaurants in Buenos Aires

From classic parrilla steakhouses to a Korean-Argentine cantina, here’s where to eat in Argentina’s capital

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El Patio de los Lecheros
| El Patio de los Lecheros

Cafe, parrilla, wine, repeat — that’s pretty much what the buzzing Buenos Aires dining scene has been about for decades. Porteños (people from Buenos Aires, the port city) have long been steak eaters, and many restaurantgoing traditionalists don’t consider a meal legitimate unless heaps of grilled meats abound at the table. But in recent years, a new generation of gastronomes have looked beyond the parrilla (steakhouse) and sparked an interest in vegetable-centric dishes, worldly flavors, and reinvented comfort foods from Argentina’s past.

Logistical tips: This South American city with a European feel is home to people who love to go out. They frequent cafes, restaurants, and bars at any hour of the day. Locals eat dinner quite late, around 9 p.m. to 11 p.m., and restaurants won’t start serving cena (dinner) until at least 8 p.m. Service can arrive at a snail’s pace, and many places only accept efectivo (cash). Due to inflation and a rocky economy, prices and exchange rates for Argentine pesos are constantly changing, but anyone carrying foreign currency will generally find food incredibly affordable. If you do enjoy a meal at a traditional parrilla, order meat like a pro: As a general rule, order your steak jugoso (medium rare) or it may come overcooked for your liking.

Looking for what's new and hot? Head to the Buenos Aires heatmap. Want to focus on just the city’s most iconic parrillas? There's a guide for that, too.

Editor’s Note: Eater is not updating international maps at this time given disruptions to global travel during the COVID-19 crisis.

Prices per person, excluding alcohol:

$ = Less than 450 pesos (less than $6 USD)
$$ = 450 - 1,050 pesos ($6 - $14 USD)
$$$ = 1,050 - 1,500 pesos ($14 - $20 USD)
$$$$ = More than 1,500 pesos ($20 USD)

Allie Lazar is a freelance writer blogging about food and restaurants in Buenos Aires.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Alo’s

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Blanco Encalada 2120, B1609 Boulogne
Buenos Aires, Argentina

It’s worth the trek to the San Isidro suburb to taste the five-star dishes emerging from Alejandro Feraud’s open kitchen. This modern bistro, which opens for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, quickly became a hit for its unique way of transforming familiar Argentine flavors. Make sure to enjoy desserts from star pastry chef Yamila Di Renzo. [$$$]

From above, a stone bowl filled with stew consisting of noodles, egg, chorizo, and a smear of beans
Sorpresine in broth
Alo’s / Facebook

2. Los Platitos

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011 4781-1499

Since 1978, this infamous steakhouse has been cooking up provoleta (grilled hunks of cheese), steak sandwiches, chorizos, and waffle fries smothered in garlic and parsley. The main dining room sits over 500 covers, but the real action happens at the bar, where diners get a front-row seat to see every part of the cow sizzle over hot coals. Los Platitos is located on the Costanera Norte, close to the Aeroparque airport and across the street from the Parque de la Memoria monument. [$$]

3. Narda Comedor

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C1428DUB, Mariscal Antonio José de Sucre 664
C1428DUB CABA, Argentina
011 15-6131-0664
Visit Website

Narda Lepes is a household name in Argentina. She stars in cooking and travel shows, writes cookbooks, hosts a radio show, and sells her own line of supermarket products and kitchen appliances. Narda Comedor, her restaurant in Bajo Belgrano, takes after a mess hall, but the kitchen puts vegetables on the main stage. Many items are inspired by Lepes’s travels across Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America, and a talented crew of young cooks serve dishes for breakfast, lunch, merienda (tea time), and dinner. Narda also recently opened Comedor Diario, an all-day breakfast cafe in Palermo Hollywood. [$$$]

A bowl of whole roasted onion surrounded by mashed potato and broth, and topped with nuts and other garnishes
“The onion,” a classic dish at Narda Comedor
Eugenio Mazzinghi

4. Corte Comedor

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Av. Olazábal 1395, C1428 C1428ASK
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Argentina is a carnivorous country, so it’s a big deal when the capital city’s most talked-about butcher shop opens a restaurant. Even though Uruguayan chef (and Francis Mallmann disciple) Santiago Garat constantly changes the menu, you can expect the master to serve sirloin, skirt steak, ribeye, pork loin, and all of the homemade chorizos. Don’t miss the spicy lamb merguez starter or seasonal vegetable side dishes. Make sure to hop next door to the carnicería (butcher) to window-shop the sausages, pork, and dry-aged beef. [$$$]

A large cut of meat with distinct bones and marbling sits on a butcher counter
Great meat from Corte Carniceria next door
Corte Carniceria / Facebook

5. El Pobre Luis

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Arribeños 2393
C1428APE CABA, Argentina

Fútbol jerseys line the walls at El Pobre Luis, a bustling Chinatown parrilla. Locals pack the house to order salchicha parrilleras (sausages) and Uruguayan pamplonas, which consist of beef, chicken, or pork rolled around cheese, ham, and roasted red peppers, and cooked on the parrilla. Head to the bar for the best seat in the house, which overlooks head parrillero Beto Niz on the grill. The crispy sweetbreads, also referred to as the caviar of the parrilla, are a must-order. [$$]

Sausages and other meats cooking on a grill beyond sparks flying in the foreground
The grill in action at El Pobre Luis
El Pobre Luis / Facebook

6. Anafe

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Virrey Avilés 3216
C1426 CABA, Argentina

After hosting wildly popular pop-ups and launching a version of Anafe as a closed-door restaurant, sophomore chefs Mica Najmanovich and Nicolas Arcucci brought their newest restaurant to the general public. The vibe might be laid back, but the masterful dishes are anything but relaxed. The chefs reinterpret Eastern European, Italian, and Middle Eastern cuisines in small plates that emphasize texture, freshness, and flavor. Vegetarians won’t leave hungry either, since more than half of the menu is meat-free. The wine list features an excellent selection of boutique wines, like the torrontés and chardonnay blend from Pielihueso boutique winery. [$$$]

A plate of pasta with multiple sauces for topping besides a glass of rose wine
Pasta and wine at Anafe
@buenospaladaires_

7. Mishiguene

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Lafinur 3368
C1425FAJ CABA, Argentina

This isn’t your bubbe’s Friday-night shabbat dinner. The upscale Jewish eatery by chef Tomás Kalika recreates Ashkenazi, Sephardic, Israeli, and Middle Eastern dishes using fresh ingredients and modern techniques in a way that both intrigues and evokes nostalgia. The bone-in pastrami will leave you utterly verklempt. [$$$$]

A decorative bowl filled with hummus topped with a heaping mound of vegetables, meat, and herbs
Hummus with chicken heart, vegetables, and herbs at Mishiguene
Mishiguene / Facebook

8. Casa Cavia

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Cavia 2985
C1425DDA CABA, Argentina

Casa Cavia looks like it was taken directly from a Vogue photoshoot. The beautiful old house shares a space with a cultural center, publisher, bar, florist shop, cafe, and restaurant. Sit outside in the garden for a boozy weekday lunch, afternoon merienda (teatime), or relaxed pre-dinner drinks. Chef Julieta Caruso (an alum of Mugaritz) designed the menu, which tends to take inspiration from movies, music, and works of art. [$$$$]

A dish at Casa Cavia
Photo: Casa Cavia

9. Fugazetta Pizza at La Mezzetta

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Av. Álvarez Thomas 1321, C1427 CDA
Buenos Aires, Argentina

It’s clear why Argentines take their pizza culture so seriously: Over 60 percent of the population is of Italian descent, so dough and cheese flow through their veins. Locals could debate for days about which pizzeria serves the best Porteño pie, but the perfect balance of history, quality, and consistency is found in the cheese and onion fugazetta slice at La Mezzetta. [$]

A slice of pizza with a massive crust oozing cheese onto a metal plate
Onion and cheese fugazetta pizza
Allie Lazar

10. Sacro

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Costa Rica 6038
C1414 CABA, Argentina

Buenos Aires is one of the meatiest cities on the planet, but more than ever locals are seeking veggie-friendly options (and not just faux burgers and chorizos made with imitation meat). Sacro’s sleek digs, next to the CasaSur Palermo hotel, appeal to both the vegan and carnivorous crowd in search of creative and flavorful plant-based dishes. The international-inspired menu was designed by executive chef Maximiliano Rossi (formerly of Mirazur in France) and includes dishes like an activated-charcoal empanada, almond ricotta gnudi, jackfruit bao, and avocado key lime pie. All of the wines are natural, organic, and biodynamic too. [$$$$]

Tables, seats, and decorative banquette against a tall white wall accented with seashell like sconces
Dining room at Sacro
Sacro

11. Strange Brewing

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Delgado 658
C1426BDH CABA, Argentina

For decades, beer drinkers in Buenos Aires almost exclusively consumed Quilmes, the national brand. In recent years, however, the city has seen an artisanal beer boom of epic proportions. There may be dozens of cervecerías in every barrio, but few are quite as welcoming as this buzzing microbrewery and taproom, which offers a rotating selection of about 10 beers, usually including an IPA, pale ale, amber, and dunkel. Along with the beers, dishes include empanadas, osso buco grilled cheese, and a supreme towering plate of nachos, all of which put Strange in the running for best bar food in the entire city. [$]

A crowd stands and sits on the sidewalk outside a beer bar
Outside Strange Brewing
Strange Brewing

12. Salvaje Bakery

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Av. Dorrego 1829
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Medialunas (sweet croissants), toast with cream cheese and jam, and coffee make up the extent of a Porteño’s breakfast routine, and for that, there’s no better place than this garage-turned-bakery, where each element of desayuno shines on its own. Salvaje knows the importance of daily bread and honors the art of breadmaking with its sourdough loaves, buttery medialunas, and quality coffee. There are only a few tables, so come early or order for takeaway. [$]

Rolls at Salvaje Bakery
Photo: Salvaje Bakery / Facebook

13. Tegui

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Gurruchaga 1632
Buenos Aires, Argentina

When celebrity chef Germán Martitegui opened Tegui in 2009, he relied on word of mouth to advertise his secret restaurant, tucked behind a street art-covered wall and inconspicuous black door. Throughout the years it has transformed into one of the most important leaders in the local food scene, consistently earning a spot on the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list due to its 10-course tasting menu, which Martitegui fills with ingredients from small farms across Argentina. [$$$$]

A dish at Tegui
Photo: Tegui / Facebook

14. Heladería Pistacchio

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C1426DDN, Santos Dumont 3429
C1427EIA CABA, Argentina

While Argentina might be famous for its beef, the unsung hero of the food world is the helado. Ice cream shops are a big deal in BA, and many fans of the sweet treat head to Pistacchio in Chacarita. This artisanal heladería uses all-natural ingredients to make a wide selection of innovative flavors that go far beyond household favorites — think Oreo banana, spicy mango, or passion fruit cheesecake. Hot tip: The chocolate dip is free. [$]

15. La Carnicería

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C1425FIG, Thames 2317
C1425FIG CABA, Argentina

After centuries of the same traditional Argentine mixed grill, one restaurant has dared to modernize the sacred parrilla. La Carnicería, which means “butcher shop,” puts a twist on classic steakhouse fare with dishes that excite every sense. The early seating tends to be tourist-heavy, while the locals pour in starting around 10:30 p.m. Sit at the bar, sip on a lemon verbena gin and tonic, and enter a whole new carnivorous world of smoked chorizos, caramelized sweetbreads, beef tiraditos, and bigger-than-your-head steaks. Hot tip: The cabbage steak is a shining veggie star on the meat-heavy menu. [$$$]

A meal at La Carnicería
Photo: La Carniceria / Facebook

16. El Preferido de Palermo

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Jorge Luis Borges 2108
C1425FFD CABA, Argentina

It was a sad day when El Preferido de Palermo shuttered. The iconic Palermo bodegón had survived since 1952. Luckily, it reopened under the careful eye of Don Julio restaurateur Pablo Rivero, who not only refurbished the entire space but called on chefs Guido Tassi and Martin Lukesch to run the kitchen. Try upgraded Porteño comfort foods like milanesa with fries and all the house-made charcuterie. Open every day for lunch and dinner. [$$$]

From above, a table filled with dishes, including charcuterie, olives, nuts, and Spanish tortilla
The spread at El Preferido de Palermo
Laura Macias

17. Sunae Asian Cantina

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Humboldt 1626
1414CTP CABA, Argentina

Even though this is South America, the Porteño palate begins to sweat at even a mild sprinkling of pepper. That’s why spice addicts looking for a fix flock to the Southeast Asian Sunae Cantina. The former closed-door restaurant (private supper club) first opened in owner Christina Sunae’s home, but she turned the project brick-and-mortar to share bold homemade Filipino family recipes, stellar curries, and soul-soothing pho. [$$$]

A close-up on a bowl of khao soi, with noodles, meat, and diced vegetables emerging from bright yellow broth
Khao Soi at Sunae Asian Cantina
Sunae Asian Cantina

18. La Fuerza

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Av. Dorrego 1409, C1414CKJ C1414CKJ
Buenos Aires, Argentina

On a breezy corner on the border of Villa Crespo and Chacarita, La Fuerza keeps Argentina’s aperitivo history alive with a contemporary take on vermouth bars of the past. Come for the vermú, available on tap in white and red, made with grapes from Sebastián Zuccardi’s Mendoza winery and a selection of native herbs, spices, and flowers from the foothills of the Andes Mountains. The food doesn’t disappoint either, especially for those in search of Porteño nostalgia on a plate. Try the fainazzeta rellena, a mashup of fainá (chickpea cake) and fugazzeta (sauceless onion and cheese pizza), or go for the milanesa con fritas a caballo (schnitzel with fries and fried eggs). [$$]

A large coil of cooked sausage sits on a plate with bread and tomatoes beside a bottle of vermouth, seltzer, and a prepared glass of the two mixed
Salchicha and drinks at La Fuerza
La Fuerza

19. Don Julio

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Guatemala 4699
1425 CABA, Argentina

While Don Julio is no longer a secret, BA’s most famous upscale steakhouse still captures the hearts and stomachs of locals and travelers. This is the place to experience what the Argentine parrilla is all about: top grass-fed sirloin, rump, and skirt steak; crispy sweetbreads; and malbec by the bottle. Go for a leisurely lunch, or arrive early (or late) for dinner to avoid ultra-long waits for a table. Don’t forget to sign your wine bottle so it can be added to the wall wine sculpture. [$$$$]

Don Julio
Photo by Allie Lazar

20. Chori

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Thames 1653
C1414DDG CABA, Argentina

Affectionately called “chori” for short, the popular choripán sandwich, consisting of chorizo sausage (chori), bread (pan), and chimichurri sauce, is kind of like a hot dog on steroids. At this popular Palermo fast-food spot, diners choose from a handful of choripán options, each made with a different type of homemade chorizo. Make sure to wash it all down with a yerba mate gin and tonic. [$]

A close-up on a sandwich with slices of chorizo, lettuce, and mushrooms on a seeded hamburger bun
Smoked choripán at Chori
Chori

21. Anchoita

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Juan Ramirez de Velasco 1520, C1414ARF
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Despite his past lives as a pilot, actor, doctor, director, and activist, serial entrepreneur Enrique Piñeyro has taken on a new vocation, which he claims to be his most challenging role yet: restaurateur and chef. At his restaurant, Anchoíta, the wood bar wraps around the entire kitchen and acts as a stage at the center of the industrial-style restaurant. This is the type of place you’ll want to visit again and again to try all the crudos, grilled meats, river fishes, pasta, and quality cheeses. It tends to book up months in advance, but they do accept some walk-ins. [$$$]

A chef’s counter and place settings in a darkened bar
The kitchen, centerstage, at Anchoíta
Allie Lazar

22. Cuervo Café

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El Salvador 4580
C1414BPH CABA, Argentina

Old-school cafes notables still define Porteño culture, but Cuervo Café is the spot for those craving specialty coffee and avocado toast. With two Palermo locations, the small Soho shop is best for a quick coffee on the go, while the Hollywood corner cafe is ideal for a work meeting. Hot outside? Cool off with their ultra-refreshing lemon cold brew. [$]

From above, a plate with a small cup of espresso, a spoon, and a sweet ball
Espresso and a sweet at Cuervo Café
Cuervo Cafe / Facebook

23. Roux

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Peña 2300
C1126ABF CABA, Argentina

This corner bistro near the Recoleta cemetery has become the barrio go-to for those looking to eat and drink well. Ideal for a laid-back dinner, Roux serves fresh Mediterranean seafood dishes that are a counterpoint to the traditional meat-heavy lifestyle here. Hot tip: Small groups can request to sit at the private chef’s table in the wine cellar. [$$$]

A dish at Roux
Photo by Allie Lazar

24. Proper Restaurant

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Aráoz 1676
C1414DQH CABA, Argentina

Located inside an unmarked former mechanic shop, Proper has become a local favorite, especially among chefs. It’s a real cook’s restaurant: There’s an industrial vibe and virtually no division between the kitchen and the dining room. Most of the dishes are cooked in a custom wood-fired oven, like the off-menu special ribeye. Go with a group, snag spots at the communal table, order one of everything on the menu, and make sure to save room for the famous dulce de leche flan. Reservations aren’t accepted, so arrive at 8 p.m. to ensure a table. [$$$$]

Proper Restaurant
Photo by Allie Lazar

25. Gran Dabbang

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Av. Raúl Scalabrini Ortiz 1543
C1414DOC CABA, Argentina

Gran Dabbang delivers much-needed flavor and flair to a city with a traditional meat-and-empanadas kind of palate. The restaurant uses fresh, local produce in its small plates to blur the borders of Latin American and Asian cuisines. It’s open Monday nights, making it a favorite haunt of the local gastro community. [$$$]

A dish at Gran Dabbang
Photo by Allie Lazar

26. Empanadas at La Cocina

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Av. Pueyrredón 1508
C1118AAS CABA, Argentina
011 4825-3171

Empanadas are omnipresent in BA. They come in all shapes and sizes, baked or fried, filled with all sorts of goodness. You’ll encounter the handheld pockets on every calle, but there’s something special about this empanada dive in Recoleta, which bakes up a handful of filling options sealed with a careful repulgue fold. The keeper from the menu: the “Pikachu,” loaded with cheese, onions, and mildly spicy red pepper flakes. [$]

An empanada at La Cocina
Photo by Allie Lazar

27. El Santa Evita

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Julián Álvarez 1479
C1414 CABA, Argentina

Argentines love to debate politics, and you’ll often find locals arguing away at Santa Evita, the Peronist-themed restaurant honoring Evita Perón and Argentine comfort foods. Start the meal with an assortment of salteña-style empanadas, then choose from the stick-to-your ribs plates like milanesa con fideos (schnitzel with a side of pasta), osso buco, and mashed potatoes, and finally, for dessert, flan with dulce de leche and whipped cream. Need a late-afternoon snack? Santa Evita opens at 6 p.m. with a special empanada and aperitivo menu. [$$]

From above, a wooden serving board with several small empanadas singed rom the oven beside small bowls of sauce and a large jug of sangria
Empanadas salteñas from Santa Evita
Santa Evita

28. Julia Restaurante

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Loyola 807, C1414 C1414AUQ
Buenos Aires, Argentina

It would be impossible to know from the beautifully presented dishes hitting the table that there’s only one man in the kitchen. Julio Báez wears many hats — sous chef, line cook, dishwasher, runner — at his debut 22-seat restaurant, named after his daughter. Highlights include tartare topped with a layer of smoked butter shavings, ribeye with black and white garlic puree, watermelon carpaccio, and longaniza sausage sourced from Chacabuco, Báez’s hometown. With so many restaurants opening with the assistance of big-time investors, it’s refreshing to see an unpretentious project that focuses on the important stuff: seasonality, flavor, technique, and ingredients. [$$$]

A molded round of steak tartare topped with grated cheese on a stark white plate
Tartare at Julia
Julia Restaurante

29. La Alacena

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Gascón 1401
C1181ADA CABA, Argentina

Come for La Alacena’s hearty homemade pastas and stay for the chocolate sea salt tartlets. This quaint spot just outside of Palermo’s trendy epicenter is the type of neighborhood restaurant you wished you had in your barrio. Head chef and owner Julieta Oriolo channels her Italian background to create simple breakfasts, egg-centric brunches, prensati sandwiches, and seasonal pastas. All of La Alacena’s freshly baked breads and pastries are available for take-away at the bakery next door. [$$]

From above, two plates of pasta, a salad, and a glass of wine
Pasta lunch at La Alacena
La Alacena

30. I Latina

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Murillo 725
C1414AFE CABA, Argentina

Even the meatiest of meat eaters will hit that sad moment when they reach their BA cow limit. Fortunately, the Macías siblings at I Latina serve a much-welcome beef alternative. Located in a beautiful refurbished Villa Crespo house, the reservation-only restaurant transports diners to the beaches of Colombia with a seafood-rich tasting menu of Caribbean coastal flavors. [$$$$]

A small mound of ceviche sitting in juices on a wooden bar
Ceviche at I Latina
Laura Macías

31. Don Ignacio

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Av. Rivadavia 3439
C1203AAG CABA, Argentina
011 4861-3133

Off the tourist track in residential Almagro, the local dive Don Ignacio is the king of the milanesa. Deep-fried flattened cutlets of chicken or veal are topped with a universe of cheesy and porky adornments. Portions are huge and prices are cheap. This is Argentine comfort food at its finest. [$]

Don Ignacio
Photo by Allie Lazar

32. Choripán at Nuestra Parrilla

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C1102AAI, Carlos Calvo 471
C1102AAI CABA, Argentina

This is the type of excellent hole-in-the-wall you always wish you could find while traveling. Nuestra Parrilla is tucked inside a crevice in the San Telmo market. It isn’t easy to spot, but just follow the scent of glorious meat smoke and you’ll probably find your way to this humble grill. The best thing on the six-item menu is the choripán, which could also be one of the greatest sandwiches to ever grace this Earth. It’s a simple sandwich made up of just chorizo sausage (chori), a bread roll (pan), and a liberal dousing of chimichurri sauce, but the satisfying sandwich might be your most memorable bite in Argentina. [$]

Choripán at Nuestra Parrilla
Photo by Allie Lazar

33. Nilson

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Carlos Calvo 463
C1102 CABA, Argentina

It took dozens of visits to the Mercado de San Telmo before sommelier Samantha Nilson found out how to open a space in the market. Finally, one lucky day, she saw a “for rent” sign on a tiny kiosk and landed the dream location for her first wine bar. Every month Nilson changes the carefully selected wine list to feature a handful of Argentina’s best bottles, which are available by the glass. She keeps it simple with the food menu, which offers sandwiches and local cheeses. Drinkers don’t have to stay at the bar as they sip: Guests are encouraged to walk around the mercado or spill out onto the sidewalk to interact with barrio locals. [$$]

A baguette sandwich sliced in half with cheese and deli meat visible from the side, alongside a glass of rose wine on a marble counter
Wine and a sandwich at Nilson
Nilson / Facebook

34. El Patio de los Lecheros

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Av. Tte. Gral. Donato Álvarez 175
C1406 CABA, Argentina

Food halls are having a moment in Buenos Aires, and Patio de los Lecheros is a prime example. The lively open-air market in Caballito sits in an abandoned train station. Food trucks, stalls, and communal picnic tables fill the space, with an eclectic mix of options representing Porteño food diversity: grilled meat sandwiches, shawarma, ceviche, and tacos. Tacos and burritos from Taquería Díaz are a go-to, especially washed down with a fernet y cola. [$$]

Diners sit at a series of long communal tables beneath a colorful glass ceiling in a wide open food hall
Picnic tables at food hall El Patio de los Lecheros
El Patio de los Lecheros

35. Urondo Bar

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C1424BDZ, Beauchef 1204, C1424 BDZ
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Chef and owner Javier Urondo regularly ventures to the giant Mercado Central (central market) and Mercado de Liniers (Bolivian market) to source the freshest ingredients and spices for his unique twist on the classic bodegón (Argentine cantina). Since Urondo is located near BA’s Koreatown, and many of the clients are Korean, the kitchen incorporates Korean flavors on the very Porteño menu (think blood sausage, sweetbreads, kimchi, and a lot of meat). [$$$]

A thick-cut steak on a grill lit by fire flaring up nearby
Steak at Urondo Bar
Urondo Bar

36. Don Carlos

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Brandsen 699
C1161AAM CABA, Argentina
011 4362-2433

There’s no menu at Don Carlos, the no-frills family-run joint that opened in 1973 across from the Boca Juniors La Bombonera soccer stadium. The great Don Carlitos sizes you up at the door and brings out whatever he thinks you should eat that day, including Italian dishes made by his wife Marta, and desserts cooked by his daughter Gaby. Gluten-free eaters and vegetarians need not apply, as pasta and meat are the stars of the show. [$$$]

A wide, rustic grill with meat on the fire against a white brick wall decorated with signs
The grill at Don Carlos
Allie Lazar

37. El Ferroviario

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Av. Reservistas Argentinos 219
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Whole slabs of beef sizzle on the grills outside of El Ferroviario, a giant meat palace located on the outskirts of Buenos Aires in an abandoned railway station behind a parking garage. Serving more than 1,000 covers per night, this place is always a scene, and it boasts all the qualities that many look for in a go-to parrilla: Portions are large, prices are cheap, and the restaurant caters to groups. Waiters move between the outdoor grill and mess hall balancing plates overflowing with every part of the cow. To avoid long wait times, reservations are a must. [$$]

The grill at El Ferroviario
Photo: El Ferroviario / Facebook

38. La Feria de Mataderos

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Av. de los Corrales
Buenos Aires, Argentina
+54 11 4342 9629
Visit Website

As you stroll through La Feria de Mataderos, the outdoor Sunday market made by locals for locals, you may stumble across a cast-iron pan perched over an open flame with glistening empanadas frying inside. You better order one. The gaucho (Argentine cowboy) fair makes up for what BA lacks in street-food culture, and it has become the best destination for truly soaking up Argentine culinary culture via street meat, empanadas, torta frita (fried dough), and regional dishes like tamales, locro (hominy stew), and humitas (steamed creamed corn). [$]

La Feria de Mataderos
Photo by Allie Lazar

1. Alo’s

Blanco Encalada 2120, B1609 Boulogne, Buenos Aires, Argentina
From above, a stone bowl filled with stew consisting of noodles, egg, chorizo, and a smear of beans
Sorpresine in broth
Alo’s / Facebook

It’s worth the trek to the San Isidro suburb to taste the five-star dishes emerging from Alejandro Feraud’s open kitchen. This modern bistro, which opens for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, quickly became a hit for its unique way of transforming familiar Argentine flavors. Make sure to enjoy desserts from star pastry chef Yamila Di Renzo. [$$$]

Blanco Encalada 2120, B1609 Boulogne
Buenos Aires, Argentina

2. Los Platitos

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Since 1978, this infamous steakhouse has been cooking up provoleta (grilled hunks of cheese), steak sandwiches, chorizos, and waffle fries smothered in garlic and parsley. The main dining room sits over 500 covers, but the real action happens at the bar, where diners get a front-row seat to see every part of the cow sizzle over hot coals. Los Platitos is located on the Costanera Norte, close to the Aeroparque airport and across the street from the Parque de la Memoria monument. [$$]

3. Narda Comedor

C1428DUB, Mariscal Antonio José de Sucre 664, C1428DUB CABA, Argentina
A bowl of whole roasted onion surrounded by mashed potato and broth, and topped with nuts and other garnishes
“The onion,” a classic dish at Narda Comedor
Eugenio Mazzinghi

Narda Lepes is a household name in Argentina. She stars in cooking and travel shows, writes cookbooks, hosts a radio show, and sells her own line of supermarket products and kitchen appliances. Narda Comedor, her restaurant in Bajo Belgrano, takes after a mess hall, but the kitchen puts vegetables on the main stage. Many items are inspired by Lepes’s travels across Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America, and a talented crew of young cooks serve dishes for breakfast, lunch, merienda (tea time), and dinner. Narda also recently opened Comedor Diario, an all-day breakfast cafe in Palermo Hollywood. [$$$]

C1428DUB, Mariscal Antonio José de Sucre 664
C1428DUB CABA, Argentina

4. Corte Comedor

Av. Olazábal 1395, C1428 C1428ASK, Buenos Aires, Argentina
A large cut of meat with distinct bones and marbling sits on a butcher counter
Great meat from Corte Carniceria next door
Corte Carniceria / Facebook

Argentina is a carnivorous country, so it’s a big deal when the capital city’s most talked-about butcher shop opens a restaurant. Even though Uruguayan chef (and Francis Mallmann disciple) Santiago Garat constantly changes the menu, you can expect the master to serve sirloin, skirt steak, ribeye, pork loin, and all of the homemade chorizos. Don’t miss the spicy lamb merguez starter or seasonal vegetable side dishes. Make sure to hop next door to the carnicería (butcher) to window-shop the sausages, pork, and dry-aged beef. [$$$]

Av. Olazábal 1395, C1428 C1428ASK
Buenos Aires, Argentina

5. El Pobre Luis

Arribeños 2393, C1428APE CABA, Argentina
Sausages and other meats cooking on a grill beyond sparks flying in the foreground
The grill in action at El Pobre Luis
El Pobre Luis / Facebook

Fútbol jerseys line the walls at El Pobre Luis, a bustling Chinatown parrilla. Locals pack the house to order salchicha parrilleras (sausages) and Uruguayan pamplonas, which consist of beef, chicken, or pork rolled around cheese, ham, and roasted red peppers, and cooked on the parrilla. Head to the bar for the best seat in the house, which overlooks head parrillero Beto Niz on the grill. The crispy sweetbreads, also referred to as the caviar of the parrilla, are a must-order. [$$]

Arribeños 2393
C1428APE CABA, Argentina

6. Anafe

Virrey Avilés 3216, C1426 CABA, Argentina
A plate of pasta with multiple sauces for topping besides a glass of rose wine
Pasta and wine at Anafe
@buenospaladaires_

After hosting wildly popular pop-ups and launching a version of Anafe as a closed-door restaurant, sophomore chefs Mica Najmanovich and Nicolas Arcucci brought their newest restaurant to the general public. The vibe might be laid back, but the masterful dishes are anything but relaxed. The chefs reinterpret Eastern European, Italian, and Middle Eastern cuisines in small plates that emphasize texture, freshness, and flavor. Vegetarians won’t leave hungry either, since more than half of the menu is meat-free. The wine list features an excellent selection of boutique wines, like the torrontés and chardonnay blend from Pielihueso boutique winery. [$$$]

Virrey Avilés 3216
C1426 CABA, Argentina

7. Mishiguene

Lafinur 3368, C1425FAJ CABA, Argentina
A decorative bowl filled with hummus topped with a heaping mound of vegetables, meat, and herbs
Hummus with chicken heart, vegetables, and herbs at Mishiguene
Mishiguene / Facebook

This isn’t your bubbe’s Friday-night shabbat dinner. The upscale Jewish eatery by chef Tomás Kalika recreates Ashkenazi, Sephardic, Israeli, and Middle Eastern dishes using fresh ingredients and modern techniques in a way that both intrigues and evokes nostalgia. The bone-in pastrami will leave you utterly verklempt. [$$$$]

Lafinur 3368
C1425FAJ CABA, Argentina

8. Casa Cavia

Cavia 2985, C1425DDA CABA, Argentina
A dish at Casa Cavia
Photo: Casa Cavia

Casa Cavia looks like it was taken directly from a Vogue photoshoot. The beautiful old house shares a space with a cultural center, publisher, bar, florist shop, cafe, and restaurant. Sit outside in the garden for a boozy weekday lunch, afternoon merienda (teatime), or relaxed pre-dinner drinks. Chef Julieta Caruso (an alum of Mugaritz) designed the menu, which tends to take inspiration from movies, music, and works of art. [$$$$]

Cavia 2985
C1425DDA CABA, Argentina

9. Fugazetta Pizza at La Mezzetta

Av. Álvarez Thomas 1321, C1427 CDA, Buenos Aires, Argentina
A slice of pizza with a massive crust oozing cheese onto a metal plate
Onion and cheese fugazetta pizza
Allie Lazar

It’s clear why Argentines take their pizza culture so seriously: Over 60 percent of the population is of Italian descent, so dough and cheese flow through their veins. Locals could debate for days about which pizzeria serves the best Porteño pie, but the perfect balance of history, quality, and consistency is found in the cheese and onion fugazetta slice at La Mezzetta. [$]

Av. Álvarez Thomas 1321, C1427 CDA
Buenos Aires, Argentina

10. Sacro

Costa Rica 6038, C1414 CABA, Argentina