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An industrial exterior with neon light pouring out of the warehouse-like space inside, and a large crowd gathered outside standing around open doorways or lounging on patio chairs. Oedipus Brewing

The 38 Essential Amsterdam Restaurants

Ossenworst and seasonal beers at a canal-side brewery, Surinamese platters from a metro station, first-of-the-season herring from a classic street stall, and more great bites to try now in Amsterdam

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The dining scene in Amsterdam has changed dramatically in the last decade. In the wake of the bistronomy movements that overtook Paris and London, a new generation of chefs opened restaurants in the Dutch capital, challenging diners with creative, vegetable-forward cooking, reinventing classic Dutch specialties, and pairing dishes with natural wines.

On the latest roundup of Amsterdam’s essential restaurants, you will find timeless favorites and luxury options, but this map also reflects the ways Amsterdam’s dining scene has come of age with innovative restaurants like Choux, Bak, De Kas, Euro Pizza, and Bar Centraal. It features restaurants all over town, including neighborhoods that tourists tend to miss, and some great bars where you can explore the city’s craft beer and cocktail scene. Many of the best places to eat in Amsterdam today are wonderfully casual spots where you can experience modern Dutch cuisine in relatively affordable, multicourse set menus, making this culinary revolution delightfully accessible to locals and visitors.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Cornerstore

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Music plays a major role at Cornerstore, a collab between a handful of vets from popular spots like Café Binnenvisser and De Klaproos. At the minimalist space in Amsterdam Noord (north Amsterdam), a cabinet behind the bar is full of vinyl, which lends superb music to meals of natural wines and pan Asian-inspired dishes bursting with fresh, fermented, umami-packed flavors. Vegetables are the lead singers in most items, while fish and meat form a background chorus. Order small plates to share, or enjoy the attractively priced 10-course chef’s menu. Don’t forget to put on your dancing shoes; midway through supper the music turns up, before the tables are cleared away altogether for guests to dance toward evening’s end.

Bak Restaurant

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Seasonality, creativity, and simplicity are at the core of Bak, one of the best places to experience modern Dutch cuisine while enjoying fantastic views of the river IJ. Chef Benny Blisto carefully puts together vegetable-focused tasting menus with sustainable fish and game. The wine list is fun and varied, with a good selection of natural wines and reasonable prices.

A long dining room interior with high wood-beamed ceilings, simple tables set on the wood floor, and and open kitchen at the far end.
Inside Bak.
Bak Restaurant

Café Restaurant Amsterdam

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Café Restaurant Amsterdam is a convivial brasserie housed in a 19th-century water pump station. The restaurant has remained beloved among locals since opening in 1996. It offers a vast menu, with sandwiches and cakes at lunchtime and seafood (be sure to take a glance into the fruits de mer menu), meat, and pasta at dinner. There’s even a great, well-priced wine list. It’s the kind of family-friendly place that everybody will enjoy.

A puck of beef tartare topped with an egg yolk presented in half an eggshell.
Tartare at Café Restaurant Amsterdam.
Monique van Loon

Euro Pizza

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Don’t be fooled by the name; hidden gem Euro Pizza is so much more than a pizzeria. The “pizza driven wine bar” produces great wood oven-baked sourdough pizzas with delicious toppings like miso, smoked tomato, tarragon, and mozzarella, but it also serves a range of rough yet elegant small dishes with an emphasis on local produce. All of this is accompanied by vin naturel, homemade lemonade, and local beer.

Oedipus Brewing

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The Amsterdam craft beer scene is one of the most dynamic in Europe. At the Oedipus Brewery in northern Amsterdam, you can enjoy playfully named IPAs, saisons, unfiltered lagers, and more, all decked out in psychedelic labels. From Thursday through Sunday, local food truck the Beef Chief pops up in the taproom to offer some of the city’s best burgers. And if you’re in Amsterdam East, be sure to check out their second location, Oedipus Badhuis.

An industrial exterior with neon light pouring out of the warehouse-like space inside, and a large crowd gathered outside standing around open doorways or lounging on patio chairs.
Outside Oedipus Brewing.
Oedipus Brewing

Caffè Toscanini

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Loved by locals and tourists for over three decades, Caffè Toscanini is renowned for its consistently high-quality, seasonal Italian cuisine. Listen carefully to the maitre d’, who will reveal daily specials that you won’t want to miss. If a full meal isn’t in order, head next door to Toscanini Deli for espresso and delicious focaccia sandwiches. They also carry a large selection of Italian products to enjoy at home, such as handmade pastas and fresh sauces.

Monique van Loon

Café Parlotte

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This charming, mostly French-oriented wine bar is a perfect spot to enjoy a glass of crisp Chablis with pate or some oysters in the late afternoon. Have your apéro inside, where it’s busy and lively, or on the sunny terrace on warmer days. Try the clams with piment d’Espelette from the bar snacks, and be sure to soak some sourdough bread in that spicy oil. If you’re craving more, come for dinner after 5 p.m. for a daily three- or four-course menu. Sommeliers Margot Los and Marjolein Peltzer are glad to assist customers in selecting suitable wines to go alongside, many available by the glass.

A long plate of clams in sauce with herb garnish.
Clams with piment d’Espelette.
Monique van Loon

Café De Klepel

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For years De Klepel has been a go-to for French bistro food and a great, well-priced wine list. The restaurant offers set menus with three or four courses, but the bar also works if you’d rather just pop by for a glass of wine and a snack. The sommeliers are more than happy to help you pick a wine by the glass and, if the urge strikes, find something from the restaurant’s charcuterie and cheese selection to pair with your drink.

A bowl of sliced fish in green sauce with sprigs of samphire and dots of orange roe.
Raw corvina with samphire and salmon roe.
Monique van Loon

Choux is part of a wave of casual restaurants redefining dining in Amsterdam and a true ambassador for modern Dutch cuisine and vegetarian cuisine in the city. Chef Merijn van Berlo’s menu is based on seasonal produce, including vegetables, herbs, and flowers from the urban garden behind the restaurant. While fish and meat appear at Choux, the vegan and vegetarian menus highlight some of the most creative vegetable-forward cooking in Europe, and the excellent wine list includes many interesting finds. No wonder they won an award for vegetable-forward cooking from Gault Millau in 2022.

As seen from above, what looks to be a bundle of wild flowers and leaves atop a small pool of broth in a ceramic plate.
North Sea crab, nasturtium leaves and flowers, green apple, sorrel juice, lovage oil, and celery ice pearls.
Choux

Proeflokaal Arendsnest

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Proeflokaal Arendsnest is the place to get a taste of the ever-growing Dutch craft beer scene. It’s hard to beat the bar’s selection of 52 Dutch craft beers on tap, plus over 100 beers by the bottle. Don’t be overwhelmed; the enthusiastic and knowledgeable staff will happily guide you through the offerings. If all that drinking piques your appetite, ask for the bar snack menu, which includes excellent Dutch charcuterie and cheese. Also check out the list of ciders, liqueurs, whiskeys, and over 40 jenevers, all of which are made in the Netherlands.

Inside a bar crowded with customers and staff in waistcoats.
Bar at Proeflokaal Arendsnest.
Proeflokaal Arendsnest/Facebook

Dutch Courage

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This cocktail bar is located on Chinatown’s Zeedijk, one of Amsterdam’s oldest streets close to the Red Light District. Tess Posthumus and Timo Janse, who also co-own the beloved bar Flying Dutchmen, take inspiration for their concoctions from famous Dutch products, pubs, and people, like King Willem-Alexander or Vincent van Gogh. The menu also features a huge selection of jenevers, including extremely rare bottlings collected by Posthumus during her many travels. Check out the world’s first kopstoot vending machine, which serves shots of jenever with beer pairings.

A bar interior with backlit bottle shelves, stools at a round wood bar, and a bright vending machine.
Inside Dutch Courage.
Dutch Courage

Viên on Tweede Hugo de Grootstraat is run by a Dutch couple with Vietnamese roots who serve all kinds of banh mi, from classic pork to beef, chicken, fried fish, or tofu. The thịt heo nướng is a real treat: The fluffy white bread is covered in spicy marinated and grilled pork, mayonnaise, pickled carrot and daikon, red chile pepper, and coriander. Pair anything with a cup of Vietnamese iced coffee or mango bubble tea.

Monique van Loon

Wil Graanstra Friteshuis

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No trip to Amsterdam is complete without fries, and Wil Graanstra’s legendary patatkraam (fries stall) is one of the city’s finest. The family-run operation has been on the square beside the Westerkerk since 1956. Graanstra fries fresh-cut potatoes to order, to be enjoyed simply with mayonnaise or ketchup. Go early. He usually sells out by mid-afternoon.

Haring & Zo

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Contrary to popular belief, Dutch herring is not raw but rather salt-cured — although the complex curing process does give it a raw finish on the tongue. Haring & Zo is one of the few stalls left in Amsterdam these days where you can taste traditional, first-of-the-season herring, called Hollandse nieuwe, usually available starting in early June. Order one au naturel, or opt for the classic accompaniments of raw chopped onion and pickles.

Hands lift pieces of herring with a toothpick.
Hollandse nieuwe.
Anita Hermans/Shutterstock

Gebr. Hartering

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At Gebr. Hartering, brothers Paul and Niek Hartering focus on local ingredients and the best wines. Start your meal with some fresh oysters or charcuterie, followed by the daily five- or seven-course menu, the latter including their signature dry-aged, charcoal-grilled prime rib. A fish option is available too, and the vegetable dishes are always inspiring.

A wood-paneled dining room with tables set for dinner with white tablecloths.
Dining room at Gebr. Hartering.
Gebr. Hartering/Facebook

Fromagerie Abraham Kef

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Fromagerie Abraham Kef supplies many restaurants in Amsterdam with cheese. At the flagship shop, established on Marnixstraat in 1953, you can taste Kef’s excellent raw-milk cheeses and some magnificent aged Dutch cheeses (don’t leave without trying some Remeker). In 2014, the shop opened a second location on the Czaar Peterstraat, followed by a tasting room on the Van der Pekplein in Amsterdam Noord, but it’s worth visiting the original to see where it all started.

A cheese plate with several varieties, a knife, and a glass of wine nearby.
Cheese plate at Fromagerie Abraham Kef.
Fromagerie Abraham Kef/Facebook

Fort Negen

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This French bakery in the western part of the city bakes divine sourdough bread, irresistible pain au chocolat, and exquisite cannelés. There’s a lot of attention to craft, especially fermentation, and the staff bakes nonstop throughout the day so there’s always something fresh. The bakery features mouthwatering specials on weekends, from chocolate cruffins to savory croissants with cheese and homemade tapenade. Check out the soft serve ice cream in a croissant cone, and look for the bakery’s stand at the Hermitage Markt (in the courtyard of the Hermitage museum on the Amstel, on the other side of the city).

Trays of croissants and other pastries on display in a case with prices written on the glass.
The pastry case at Fort Negen.
Monique van Loon

Chun Café

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This bubble tea shop in the city’s Nine Streets neighborhood began as a takeout concept. While its bubble tea is unquestionably delicious (particularly the brown sugar milk tea with tapioca pearls and the mango jasmine tea with lychee jelly), Chun’s sandwiches are especially worth a visit. Thick slices of fluffy, golden-brown toasted brioche are split from the top, forming a perfect little pouch for lavish fillings. The creamy egg salad toast is wonderful in its simplicity, but you’ll never forget the bulgogi toast: tender strips of rib-eye in a Korean marinade, topped with boiled egg, spicy gochujang sauce, and yuzu mayonnaise.

A sandwich sticking out of a cardboard box topped with stripes of various sauces.
Ribeye bulgogi toast.
Chun Café

Fou Fow Ramen

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Fou Fow Ramen was founded in 2011 by Chinese-Dutch filmmaker Fow Pyng Hu as a ramen shop on the second floor of the famous Toko Dun Yong market on the Zeedijk. That location has closed, but three full-fledged restaurants followed: Fou Fow Ramen locations on Elandsgracht and Van Woustraat, as well as Fou Fow Udon on Prinsengracht. Try the sophisticated shio ramen with salty chicken broth and sababushi (dried and smoked mackerel), or the tonkotsu ramen, the ultimate hug in a bowl, which delivers deep, fatty flavors.

Two bowls of ramen on a wooden counter.
Tonkotsu and tori lemon ginger ramen.
Fou Fow Ramen

Rotisserie Amsterdam

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The burgers at Rotisserie are arguably the best in town, probably because everything is made from scratch. For proof, look no further than the royale with cheese, a double smash burger with cheddar, lettuce, tomato, pickles, and burger sauce on a pillowy soft bun.  Especially voracious eaters should try the Fucking Everything, a variety of fried chicken, pulled pork sliders, buffalo hot wings, and chicken tenders. And don’t leave without a side of turbo cheese fries, topped with cheddar, scallions, crunchy chile flakes, and peanuts. There is also a second location in the eastern part of the city.

nNea Pizza

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The Amsterdam pizza scene is growing fast, and nNea leads the way in the modern Neapolitan style. No wonder the restaurant was the first Dutch place on the 50 Top Pizza Europe (the list of best European pizzerias outside of Italy). The restaurant adamantly opposes the notion of pizza as fast food, committing to a time-consuming process (that could last up to five days) of fermenting, resting, and proofing their dough. Chef Vincenzo Onnembo bakes the light, chewy dough in a bright yellow Pasquale Fazzone pizza oven and tops the pies with primo seasonal ingredients. The restaurant only serves dinner, and reservations are essential.

As seen from above, a singed pizza with a thick outer crust, topped with tomato sauce, cheese and leaves of basil.
Pizza Margherita.
Nnea Pizza / Facebook

Bar Centraal

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At first sight Bar Centraal may look like a regular pub, but this “bistro extraordinaire” serves great natural wines and exceptional food. The menu of reasonably priced share plates varies on a regular basis but it’s always full of unique options with intense flavors. In the summer, the sunlit terrace on Ten Katestraat is ideal for spending hours with a glass of orange wine, a cheese board, or some bread with concerningly good lardo butter.

From above, a bowl of mussels in green sauce with peas and sprigs of dill.
Mussels, peas, and dill.
Monique van Loon

De Hapjeshoek

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The Singh brothers have been serving amazing Surinamese food at De Hapjeshoek (the Snack Corner) inside metro station Waterlooplein for over 27 years. While you can enjoy flavorful dishes like pom, roti, and bara at the cafe, it’s nice to grab takeaway and head for a bench outside looking out towards the Amstel river. Try the moksi meti, a steal at just 7.50 euros for a full meal of fried rice, noodles, or white rice topped with roasted chicken in kecap manis (sweet soy sauce), long beans, and other veggies.

Brouwerij 't IJ

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This Amsterdam brewery has a unique canal-side location, right next to an old windmill, making the outdoor terrace a popular hangout on sunny days. A handful of the brewery’s own beers are available on tap, including the classics Zatte and Natte, usually alongside a special seasonal brew. A small selection of bar snacks is on offer, like traditional Dutch ossenworst, a smoked beef sausage supplied by Amsterdam butcher De Wit.

Customers at an outdoor patio beneath a large windmill.
Exterior at Brouwerij ‘t IJ.
Brouwerij ‘t IJ/Facebook

Dignita Hoftuin

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This all-day brunch restaurant, located in a secluded courtyard, is the perfect place to break away from the hustle and bustle of the city, especially to sit on the outdoor terrace in the summer. Order the benedict-like Benny Boy with poached eggs, bacon, and hollandaise on their signature crispy potato hash, or go for the chickpea fritters with whipped ricotta, preserved lemon relish, poached egg, fresh avocado, and homemade lemon thyme za’atar. Pair anything with the excellent spicy bloody mary. Dignita also has two other locations near Vondelpark and Westerpark, two of the city’s best parks.

A shot of an outdoor patio from above, with small patio tables and umbrellas, rows of hedges along one side, open green space out to another side, and an L-shaped building surrounding the rest.
The outdoor terrace at Dignita Hoftuin.
Dignita Hoftuin

The terrace of this classic French bistro may be located in the vibrant Helmersbuurt neighborhood in the Old West part of the city, but it instantly transports guests to France. The menu includes standbys (at attractive prices) such as steak tartare, confit de canard, and escargot with herb butter. Be sure to save room for the incredible creme brulee. Reservations are recommended, especially if you’d like to stop by for an early supper before visiting one of Amsterdam’s theaters within walking distance, like the DeLaMar and the Stadsschouwburg.

A slice of grilled cabbage covered in sauce and chopped fixings.
Grilled oxheart cabbage with white bean cream.
Monique van Loon

Spectrum

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Spectrum (formerly Librije’s Zusje) is an outstanding two-Michelin-starred restaurant. Chef Sidney Schutte produces exceptional food with imaginative, often highly unusual flavor combinations, like Dutch lobster with duck tongue and duck liver, licorice, green apple, and pistou. The attention to detail both on the plate and in the dining room is exquisite. A meal here is absolutely worth the splurge.

Geometrically sliced squid with a bright red crust sits beside chunks of more squid, flowers, and mango slices beneath a white foam.
Squid lacquered with coffee, periwinkles, cardamom, mango, and coriander.
Spectrum / Facebook

Tigris en Eufraat

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This charming Syrian deli on Amsterdam East’s busy Javastraat street, serves the best homemade mezes. Let the friendly staff members fill up containers with baba ghanoush, hummus, or moutabal (smoked aubergine, tahini, garlic, and yogurt dip), or treat yourself to a takeaway lunch of Syrian bread with lamb shawarma or halloumi. Tigris also serves Amsterdam’s finest falafel, paired with crisp cucumber, tomato, mint leaves, iceberg lettuce, and pickled kohlrabi on superb flat bread.

Taste of Culture

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There are also a dizzying array of excellent choices on the menu at Taste of Culture, from elegant dim sum to pungent mapo tofu, but everyone comes for one thing: the finest Peking duck in town, with tender meat and incredibly crispy skin. One of Amsterdam’s best Chinese places, the restaurant offers duck by the half or whole, served with rice and various sauces, or sliced and served with paper-thin pancakes.

Takeout from Taste of Culture.
Monique van Loon

Bambino

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The Bak team welcomed a baby in 2020: Bambino. Whereas the original fine dining restaurant requires reservations, this sister spot is more casual, inviting guests to enjoy one or two smaller courses with a glass of natural wine. The menu is small but inspirational, with a focus on vegetables and seafood, and with the occasional meat added in for good measure. Don’t forget to check out the snack menu, which includes unique items like pimientos de padrón with oyster cream, and sourdough toast with wild garlic butter.

From above, a range of dishes on bright geometric background.
A full spread at Bambino.
Bambino

Bouchon du Centre

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In central Amsterdam, you’ll find Bouchon du Centre, a Lyonnaise bistro that’s traditional right down to the classic red-and-white tablecloths. Hanneke Schouten has owned and run the restaurant for 23 years, serving bouchon staples such as boudin noir aux pommes (blood sausage with apples), quenelles de brochet (pike dumplings), and oeufs en meurette (poached eggs in red wine sauce). Take note of the charcuterie selection, which comes directly from Lyon. Reservations are recommended, and do keep an eye on the opening hours; the place is currently only open for lunch from Wednesday to Saturday.

Slices of terrine on a floral-decorated plate with pickles.
Terrine de porc.
Monique van Loon

Rijks at the Rijksmuseum

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Michelin-starred Rijks brings a fresh approach to museum dining in the Rijksmuseum of Dutch art and history. On the menu, designed by chef Joris Bijdendijk and his team, you will find inventive small plates, often with creative uses of Dutch heritage ingredients. Order a la carte or treat yourself to a five- or six-course menu with wine or non-alcoholic pairings. Don’t miss the signature poultry dish, which includes various culinary preparations of Chaams hoen, a type of Dutch fowl kept by the artisan poulterer Geert van der Kaa. Rijks also regularly hosts chef collaboration dinners with household names from the international dining scene.

From above, a small pastry topped with chopped greens.
A dish at Rijks.
Rijks/Facebook

Clos Amsterdam

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Clos has the charm of a small Mediterranean wine bar but with a tad more space. The delectable menu (with an incredible price-to-quality ratio) includes unexpected combinations and wine from all around the world. The flexible spot is great with a group of friends for a casual drink and some homemade cheese croquettes, a celebration with oysters and Champagne at the bar, or a multiple-course fine dining feast with wine pairings.

Two oysters dyed pink with mignonette on a bed of ice.
Oysters with mignonette.
Monique van Loon

Massimo Gelato

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A big favorite among ice cream fanatics, Massimo now has four locations in De Pijp, East, West, and South Amsterdam. Head for the one on Van Ostadestraat, the first branch that owner Massimo Bertonasco opened in 2017. The long queues are worth braving for superb gelato and sorbetto in classic Italian flavors. The chocolate is popular, but do try the pistachio, fior di latte, or ricotta with figs as well. In summertime they also serve excellent iced coffee. Sweet-toothed visitors with a larger appetite should order the brioche con gelato, a typical Sicilian treat that hits just as well here.

A hand holds a small cup of gelato over the sidewalk. A large thin waffle sticks out.
Hazelnut and pistachio gelato.
Monique van Loon

Leeman Döner

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This tiny Turkish kebab shop is a favorite of chefs and locals, prized for its fully loaded veal, chicken, and mixed doner sandwiches served in house-baked pita. The shop also offers kapsalon (literally “hairdresser”), a delicious Dutch creation of fries piled high with layers of kebab and cheese, then finished under the grill and topped with lettuce, garlic, and spicy sambal sauce. Only ambitious eaters should attempt to consume it all.

A pita split open into a sandwich stuffed with kebab meat and diced vegetables, covered in white sauce, all held in wax paper.
Doner kebab.
Leeman Döner

Opened in 2001, this acclaimed restaurant is known for its farm-to-table cuisine and its unique location in a vintage greenhouse that dates back to 1926. Items feature produce from the restaurant’s own vegetable gardens and greenhouse, but they also include plenty of meat and fish. A five-course dinner costs 63 euros, a bit pricier than most meals in town, while a three-course lunch menu will run you 41.50. The meals can also be made fully vegetarian or vegan.

Since 2012 Rijsel has been recognized as one of the pioneers of the Amsterdam bistronomy movement. Iwan Driessen helms the kitchen, putting out a menu of French and Flemish classics such as rotisserie chicken, Breton fish soup, huzarensalade (olivier salad), and rich côte de boeuf. Rijsel’s wine list is an absolute joy, with a wonderful selection of Burgundy and Bordeaux wines. Order individual items from the menu or the three-course meal for the complete experience.

A bright dining room, with a prep station in the foreground and customers at tables beyond.
Dining room at Rijsel.
Rijsel/Facebook

Wijmpje Beukers

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Wijmpje Beukers in the Pijp area is like a cozy culinary living room. Drop by for an impromptu dinner (they don’t accept bookings) with a well-shaken espresso martini. The affordable, perpetually changing menu has a mix of meat, seafood, and vegetables, with an emphasis on surprising combos. There are always a few classics available for the less daring eater, such as beef carpaccio with basil pesto and bavette with fries.

Monique van Loon

Cornerstore

Music plays a major role at Cornerstore, a collab between a handful of vets from popular spots like Café Binnenvisser and De Klaproos. At the minimalist space in Amsterdam Noord (north Amsterdam), a cabinet behind the bar is full of vinyl, which lends superb music to meals of natural wines and pan Asian-inspired dishes bursting with fresh, fermented, umami-packed flavors. Vegetables are the lead singers in most items, while fish and meat form a background chorus. Order small plates to share, or enjoy the attractively priced 10-course chef’s menu. Don’t forget to put on your dancing shoes; midway through supper the music turns up, before the tables are cleared away altogether for guests to dance toward evening’s end.

Bak Restaurant

A long dining room interior with high wood-beamed ceilings, simple tables set on the wood floor, and and open kitchen at the far end.
Inside Bak.
Bak Restaurant

Seasonality, creativity, and simplicity are at the core of Bak, one of the best places to experience modern Dutch cuisine while enjoying fantastic views of the river IJ. Chef Benny Blisto carefully puts together vegetable-focused tasting menus with sustainable fish and game. The wine list is fun and varied, with a good selection of natural wines and reasonable prices.

A long dining room interior with high wood-beamed ceilings, simple tables set on the wood floor, and and open kitchen at the far end.
Inside Bak.
Bak Restaurant

Café Restaurant Amsterdam

A puck of beef tartare topped with an egg yolk presented in half an eggshell.
Tartare at Café Restaurant Amsterdam.
Monique van Loon

Café Restaurant Amsterdam is a convivial brasserie housed in a 19th-century water pump station. The restaurant has remained beloved among locals since opening in 1996. It offers a vast menu, with sandwiches and cakes at lunchtime and seafood (be sure to take a glance into the fruits de mer menu), meat, and pasta at dinner. There’s even a great, well-priced wine list. It’s the kind of family-friendly place that everybody will enjoy.

A puck of beef tartare topped with an egg yolk presented in half an eggshell.
Tartare at Café Restaurant Amsterdam.
Monique van Loon

Euro Pizza

Don’t be fooled by the name; hidden gem Euro Pizza is so much more than a pizzeria. The “pizza driven wine bar” produces great wood oven-baked sourdough pizzas with delicious toppings like miso, smoked tomato, tarragon, and mozzarella, but it also serves a range of rough yet elegant small dishes with an emphasis on local produce. All of this is accompanied by vin naturel, homemade lemonade, and local beer.

Oedipus Brewing