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How to Make Nut Milk at Home

If you’re tired of everything else you’ve been making, reach back into your pantry for some nuts

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If you’re stuck at home and cooking for yourself, a few things may become apparent rather quickly. You may realize your repertoire is limited. You may run out of ingredients. You may just energy and motivation, resorting to less-than-nutritious junk that requires no preparation whatsoever.

Should you find yourself in that spot, dig back into your pantry for a thing of nuts. Walnuts, cashews, and almonds are all fine. With just that and running water, you can have your own nut milk, which, for a few fleeting yet delightful minutes, may alleviate the cooking ennui. Better yet, add some agave or maple syrup or date syrup, or a dash of cinnamon or nutmeg, and you’ve got a tastier drink still.

It’s a move recommended by Eater Young Gun Francesca Chaney (’19), who also loves the fact that nut milk is vegan. Watch Chaney whip up walnut milk, as part of the Eater @ Home virtual event series, and check out the full recipe below.


Homemade Walnut Milk

Serves 1

8 ounces of walnuts, soaking in 4 ounces of water
Additional 8 ounces of water (for a thiner consistency use 16 ounces)
Optional: 1 spoonful of ground sea moss

Soak fresh walnuts in room-temperature water overnight, anywhere from eight to 24 hours. The longer the walnuts soak, the easier they are to blend and the creamier and smoother the resulting milk will be.

Dump the soaked walnuts in a high-powered blender, like a Vitamix, and blend on high (think an 8 out of 10) for two minutes, then pour out directly into a glass. If using a less powerful blender, blend for four to five minutes, and pour out through a strainer or cheese cloth to remove pulp.

For additional flavor, add one spoonful of sea moss and mix. Additional options like cinnamon, dates, and cacao are great for sweetening.

Keeps in the refrigerator for about three days.

Tune in to demo below, and check out more upcoming virtual events:

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