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Seedless Avocados Are Here to Keep You From Cutting Off Your Hands

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No dangerous knife work necessary

Here’s a new item in the produce aisle for people who adore avocados but are terrified of slicing the fruit themselves: seedless avocados. The strange product, which looks more like a cucumber or zucchini, is being featured by British retail chain Marks & Spencer.

M&S claims this thing, officially known as a “cocktail avocado,” is 100 percent edible, skin and all. The name presumably comes from the fact that it’s much safer to consume after throwing back a few alcoholic beverages: No sharp knives are required to enjoy this delicacy.

Marks & Spencer is selling the cocktail avocado as sort of a response to the scourge of “avocado hand” that is plaguing Great Britain, according to the Guardian. It seems Britons have been regularly stabbing and slicing open their hands while attempting to break down traditional avocados. These wounds are so common that the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons recently called for warning labels to be slapped on the fruit.

The British chain is getting all the internet buzz for selling cocktail avocados at the moment, but the curious delicacies have been around for a while and are available elsewhere. San Diego-based wholesaler Specialty Produce explains the lack of seed is “simply the result of an unpollinated avocado blossom.”

Some people say millennials are having trouble saving up to buy homes because the young adults of this generation are spending all of their money on avocado toast. Now, at least, there is a safer variety of the fruit that might cut down on the high medical costs associated with avocado-related injuries.

M&S Selling Stoneless Avocado That Could Cut Out Risk of Injuries [Guardian]
To Get Free Avocado Toast for a Whole Year, Just Buy This House [E]
All Pop Culture Coverage [E]

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