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Watch: How to Smoke Ribs on a Backyard Grill

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You don't need a smoker for perfect ribs

This week on You Can Do This!, host and tips-and-tricks guru Clifford Endo solves all your backyard meat smoking needs, using just a standard kettle grill. Watch the video above to learn his U-shaped secret, as well as alternative use for an oven roasting rack that ensures your homemade ribs are perfectly tender every time; the smoky, meaty how-to is below.

Smoke Meat ErryDay

1 rack of ribs
3/4 cup barbecue rub
Standard kettle grill
Wood chips
Charcoal briquettes
Fire starter
Oil or meat thermometer
Roasting rack

If your ribs have the membrane on the bone side of the rack, remove it by peeling it off whole with your hands.

Cover rack of ribs liberally with barbecue rub. Let rest in fridge for at least 1–2 hours, ideally overnight.

Dust ribs with salt and cut in half.

Prepare your grill by lining half the kettle grill with charcoal briquettes. Arrange them in two rows leaning each briquette on each other at an angle to transfer the fire like a slow fuse. Do this until you have lined half the grill with two rows. Then add a single line of briquettes on top of your double row. Add a small pile of charcoal, about 4–5 briquettes, over the start point of your fire with the fire starters. Light with cover off until the charcoal of your initial pile is half grey. Place in the grill grate. Cover with lid and place the oil thermometer in the circular vents of the grill on top of the dome. Make sure your bottom vent is slightly open as well. Once the temperature reaches 250 degrees F you are ready to smoke.

Place roasting rack upside down on top of grill and place your two half racks in the roasting rack so they are vertical. Cover and let smoke for at least 2.5–3 hours at 250 degrees. You can baste with barbecue sauce or wrap them in foil for the last half hour if desired.

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