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Tokyo's Naked Pop-Up Restaurant Has Weight and Age Restrictions

Gross, in more ways than one

Peter Paul Rubens' The Feast of Acheloüs, which is used on the pop-up's website
Peter Paul Rubens' The Feast of Acheloüs, which is used on the pop-up's website
Wikipedia Commons

Dining sans clothing: so hot right now? Naked pop-up restaurants have recently been announced in London and Melbourne, and the latest city to get on board with au naturel dining experiences is Tokyo.

According to Rocket News, the Amrita — apparently the Sanskrit word for "immortality" — will hit Tokyo on July 29. Unlike its predecessors, this pop-up will have some downright discriminatory entrance policies: Patrons must be between the ages of 18 and 60, and cannot be more than 15 kilograms (approximately 33 pounds) above the "average" weight for their height; "Diners who don’t appear to be within the desired weight range upon arrival will be weighed at the door and if they are found to be overweight, they will be denied access with no refunds." (Yes, really.)

The irony is that the company is using a painting by Peter Paul Rubens in its promotional materials. Rubens, of course, is famous for his portrayal of curvy and voluptuous men and women.

Additionally, patrons cannot have any tattoos and will be required to sport paper underwear for the duration of their organic meal (saves on chair-cleaning costs, perhaps?). Entertainment will be provided by male servers clad only in G-strings and a dance performance by male models, making this sound like the strangest and most awkward dinner party of all time.

Official

It won't come cheap, either; tickets are priced between $112 and $563 and apparently, they're already sold out. Thank goodness, because that cash could be better spent on literally anything else — like an owl cafe or a hedgehog cafe where they will presumably take your money even if you're 75 years old and tattooed with a BMI over 25, and you won't have to suffer the indignities of paper undergarments.

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