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School Bans Spicy Doritos After They Caused Student to Stop Breathing

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Doritos Roulette chips are said to be 10 times hotter than a jalapeño.

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A school in the UK has banned Doritos Roulette chips after a student ate one and nearly stopped breathing. According to the Independent, the chips — which are also sold in Canada and are apparently banned in the US — are nacho-cheese flavored, but some are coated with a spicy flavoring that "will leave you close to tears." The spicy chips — which are said to be 10 times hotter than a jalapeño — and the regular chips look exactly the same, so there is no way to identify which chip is which. The Telegraph writes that teachers at George Pindar School in North Yorkshire, England now consider the chips to be a "health and safety risk."

Kids with known respiratory conditions should probably not be eating super spicy chips in the first place.

The 14-year-old student — who apparently already had a pre-existing respiratory condition — had severe difficulty breathing after he ate a spicy chip. (Though to be fair, kids with known respiratory conditions should probably not be eating super spicy chips in the first place.) The school sent home a cautionary note to parents warning against the chip. A Doritos spokesperson tells the Independent: "We were sorry to hear about what happened. We do warn people to expect a seriously spicy experience with Doritos Roulette and we make this clear on the pack." The spokesperson adds the bag warns that the chips are "not recommended for young children."

While Doritos Roulette chips are not available stateside, Americans have access to a number of other Doritos innovations. Last week, Burger King announced that it was testing Doritos Loaded triangles, the chip company's take on mozzarella sticks. Last November, Pepsi confirmed that it was testing a Doritos-flavored Mountain Dew.

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