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Drinkeasy

A new startup called Drinkeasy wants to make it even easier for smartphone-fixated millennials to get drunk. Send a text message to this SMS-based liquor store and it'll text back with information on a particular liquor; to buy it, just reply "HELL YES." Drinkeasy doesn't sling Fireball and Jäger, though: In true hipster fashion, this service specializes in craft spirits sourced from microdistilleries across the country.

Co-founders Harry Raymond and Nick Manning are also behind Swig, a social networking app for drinkers. They tell Eater the idea for Drinkeasy stemmed from friends who would text them for drink recommendations. Many of the spirits the service sells — it ships to 35 states — aren't available in the average liquor store. One of its best sellers is Blaum Brothers Gin, which is typically only available in Iowa, Illinois, and Wisconsin.

Drinkeasy is currently available by invitation only, though that should change soon. The service also plans to expand to craft beer and wine in the future. What's not clear, however, is how the guys behind Drinkeasy intend to verify their customers are of legal drinking age.

Popular delivery apps like Seamless and GrubHub may still reign supreme, but Drinkeasy is just the latest text-based technology to pander to the tech-obsessed: An NYC-based text message service called Arcade eliminates the pesky issue of actually choosing what to eat for dinner, instead offering just one restaurant dish a day that users can get delivered by texting a simple "yes."

Domino's even toyed with allowing Twitter users to order pizza via emoji, although that idea was perhaps better in conception than execution. A startup called Fooji has picked up where Domino's idea left off, enabling customers to order any food they want by tweeting an emoji. And for those able to actually look up from their laptops long enough to eat a proper restaurant meal, making restaurant reservations via Twitter is also a possibility these days.

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