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Starbucks Crushes the Basic Human Right to Order Comically Large Drinks

Starbucks photo: 1000 Words/Shutterstock

After a Starbucks customer recently brought in his own 128-ounce glass in order to break the record for the "most expensive" Starbucks drink ever, the coffee chain's higher-ups have issued a reminder to employees that giant stunt drinks are "definitely not something we encourage." As the Starbucks Melody blog first pointed out, Starbucks headquarters recently "reemphasized" an existing policy that blended beverages and espresso drinks should not be served in amounts larger than 24 ounces for iced drinks (hot drinks have a 20-ounce cutoff). A Starbucks rep tells Eater that policy clarifications happen during conversations with employees "from time to time," but the recent 128-ounce drink inspired Starbucks to "take this opportunity to follow-up with them" about the size guidelines.

According to the rep, should a guest bring in their own 25-ounce or 128-ounce glass, Starbucks employees would be "more than happy to" fill it with a Venti-sized (24-ounce) beverage, leaving the rest of the glass empty. The policy is in effect not necessarily to curb customers' caffeine intake, but has more to do with limiting extreme customization in the name of providing a "consistent experience": "We really just want to make sure our customers are receiving a high quality product from us. The customization from last week is excessive and didn't necessarily fall under those quality guidelines that we expect."

Before last week's 128-ounce record (with a $54.75 price tag), the previous record was set by a customer who brought in his own 52-ounce cup (which ultimately held 48 espresso shots). Looks like future record-breakers will have to get more creative in jacking up their Starbucks bills.

· Dear Starbucks Customers: Beverage Size Clarification [Starbucks Melody]
· New Starbucks Free Drink Record Set [Consumerist]
· All Starbucks Coverage on Eater [-E-]

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