clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Book Roundup: Sous Chef, Gale Gand, NYT's Wine With Food, Deborah Madison

If you buy something from an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Photo: Paula Forbes / Eater.com

Welcome to the new Cookbook Roundup feature, in which Eater takes a quick look at new cookbooks, booze books, and other dining-related books. In today's roundup, there are four March and April releases: New York City restaurant vet Michael Gibney's new in-the-trenches novel Sous Chef, Chicago chef Gale Gand's new book of lunch ideas, a book on pairing wine and food from the New York Times' Florence Fabricant and Eric Asimov, and finally an update on Deborah Madison's classic vegetarian cookbook, Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone.

sous-chef-cover.jpg

Sous Chef


by Michael Gibney
sous-chef-2.jpgsous-chef-1.jpg

Are you a fan of restaurant kitchen pirate memoirs a la Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential? Sous Chef is the book for you. Written by New York City restaurant veteran Michael Gibney, the book traces 24-hours in a restaurant kitchen from the point of view of the sous chef. There's a lot of detail here, and the writing is good (if second person narrative doesn't bother you).

The book is getting a lot of early buzz — it's blurbed by the likes of chef Gabrielle Hamilton, writer Gary Shteyngart, and Bourdain himself — and is bolstered by the fact that unlike Bourdain, Gibney is still a professional chef. He's currently developing UQ in Times Square.

Ballantine; Order on Amazon


gale-gand-cover.jpg

Gale Gand's Lunch!

by Gale Gand with Christie Matheson
gale-gand-2.jpggale-gand-1.jpg

Chicago chef Gale Gand didn't think lunch, as a meal, was getting enough attention. So she wrote a book about it. In many ways, she's right. Lunch is a fun meal, full of sandwiches and snacky foods. But it's also one often spent with the people you like least in your life: your coworkers.

The book would verge on generic, book store sale bin, easy weeknight dinners to make with kids territory except for the fact that the recipes actually look amazing. Bonus, each one comes with three menus: one for packing a to-go lunch, one for eating it at home, and one for serving it at a party. Who says chefs can't write cookbooks that are also super useful?

Houghton Mifflin Harcout; Order on Amazon


food-wine-cover.jpg

Wine With Food


by Eric Asimov and Florence Fabricant
food-wine-3.jpgfood-wine-2.jpg

If you're looking for a launch pad to learn more about pairing wine with food, you could do much worse than this new book by New York Times writers Eric Asimov and Florence Fabricant. The book is split into chapters by type of wine, and includes wine notes and recipes to match each wine.

The recipes offered have a faint whiff of old school, Craig Claiborne-style cocktail party food. Not that that's a bad thing, necessarily, they're just a touch dated. (We can't get more specific than "Asian Noodle Soup"? Really?) Still, it's a good resource for wine beginners, and who couldn't use a recipe for a savory tart every once in awhile?

Rizzoli; Order on Amazon


madison-cover.jpg

New Vegetarian Cooking For Everyone


by Deborah Madison
madison-1.jpgmadison-2.jpg

Deborah Madison's classic Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone is a beloved cookbook, on a shelf with the Julia Childs and Marcella Hazans and Judy Rodgers and Silver Palates of the world. This new edition has a gorgeous new cover; gone is the famous photo of Madison wielding a wooden spoon, and in its place is an eggplant purple cover embossed with gold sketches of vegetables. It's a sophisticated, modern riff on the early vegetarian cookbooks of the 70s and 80s that were more pamphlets than cookbooks.

In addition to Madison's original book, this edition includes 150 new recipes. It also has a new introduction, in which Madison writes: "I have seen copies [of the book] in restaurants and monasteries, books with stained, swollen, and warped pages. Young people have learned to cook from it, and so have their parents...To thousands, it has introduced new flavors, techniques, and the pleasure of being able to cook one's own food with good results. I still use it myself." And with this refresh, hopefully thousands more will discover it.

Ten Speed; Order on Amazon


· All Cookbook Coverage on Eater [-E-]

Sign up for the Sign up for the Eater newsletter

The freshest news from the food world every day