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In-N-Out Burger Is a Better Place to Work Than Facebook

Perhaps places like McDonald's could learn a little something from the California-based burgermeisters.

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The grass is a little greener at In-N-Out.
The grass is a little greener at In-N-Out.
Ken Wolter/Shutterstock

"There is no other restaurant on the list, fast food or otherwise."Fast food restaurants are often criticized for the way they treat their employees — and justly so — but they're not all awful: California-based cult-favorite burger destination In-N-Out has been declared one of America's places to work "for the second time in seven years," The Motley Fool reports.

"There is no other restaurant on the list, fast food or otherwise."

That's according to employer review site Glassdoor's most recent 50 Best Places to Work list, which ranks In-N-Out in eighth place, ahead of much-lauded companies like Facebook and Apple. As Motley Fool points out, In-N-Out is an anomaly in its field: "There is no other restaurant on the list, fast food or otherwise."

So what makes flipping burgers at In-N-Out so great? Besides promoting from within and offering benefits to all employees (including part-timers), hourly employees start out at $10.50, "some 17% above the median hourly wage of $8.94 nationally for frontline fast-food workers and 44% above the federal minimum wage." They "can earn as much as $14 on average," which is awfully close to the $15-an-hour target that's been the battle cry of recent fast food employee strikes.

A new report by the Economic Policy Institute found that almost 40 percent of restaurant workers live in poverty, and that just 14.4 percent of non-union restaurant workers are provided benefits by their employers.

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