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Diners Steal Photos From Gerard Craft's Brasserie by Niche

Stealing photos off the wall is apparently a time-honored tradition in the annals of Shit People Steal. However for Gerard Craft of St. Louis destination restaurants Niche and Brasserie by Niche, and bar Taste, one such theft got personal when a photo taken by his father disappeared. The upside? "It was his proudest amateur photography moment." There's also the tale of a tipsy sommelier who didn't try to steal anything, exactly, but definitely took some liberties with the display bottles:

Throughout the restaurant at Brasserie we have a bunch of random photos framed all over the place. One person stole a very small photo that was from an antique shop; it was a portrait of some creepy old Victorian woman. The picture was about 5x5 inches, why anyone would want that photo, other than me, I have no clue. Still absolutely aggravating to have to replace that.

Then someone went for a photo that my dad took of a farmer's market in France, that was hanging by the bathrooms. This is a large photo maybe 18x24? Not something you could just shove down your pants. I was pissed, and you would think my dad would be too. But it was his proudest amateur photography moment. I think he would love it to happen again.

We also have some really old, no longer drinkable, bottles on display at our hostess stand at Niche that were salvaged from a fire at my grandparents' house. The two in question were a 1934 Armagnac and a 1947 Haut-Brion that a notable sommelier, in a tipsy moment, brought to his table and got ready to open. Our manager politely, and thankfully quickly, reminded him that the wines were just displays and would taste like shit. I think he was too drunk to be embarrassed.

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[Photo: Niche]

Brasserie by Niche

4580 Laclede Ave, Saint Louis, MO

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